Air Traffic Control Facilities: Improving Methods to Determine Staffing Requirements -- Special Report 250 (1997)

Air Traffic Control Facilities: Improving Methods to Determine Staffing Requirements -- Special Report 250
View larger
  • Status: Final Book
  • 93 pages
Air Traffic Control Facilities:
Improving Methods to Determine Staffing Requirements -- Special Report 250
(1997)
Overview

Authors

Description

TRB Special Report 250 - Air Traffic Control Facilities: Improving Methods to Determine Staffing Requirements reviewes the methodologies by which Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) estimates and applies its staffing standards, examines the feasibility and cost of modifying agency staffing standards and developing alternative approaches for application to individual facilities, and recommends an improvement strategy.

The appropriate level of staffing for air traffic control (ATC) has long been controversial. As a service of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), ATC is almost exclusively staffed by federal employees. Following the controller strike of 1981, which resulted in the firing of two-thirds of controllers, congressional concerns about staffing were focused primarily on the overall size and rebuilding of the workforce. During the 1990s, however, congressional concerns shifted to questions about whether staffing levels are appropriate at the agency s highest traffic locations.

FAA has long had difficulty staffing its ATC centers, terminal radar approach control facilities, and other terminal facilities in metropolitan areas such as New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles. In addition to being the most demanding locations because of the volume and types of traffic that must be handled, they are among the areas with the highest cost of living. Concerns about stressful working conditions and the amount of overtime required of workers at these locations have been raised regularly by the controllers union and sometimes by members of Congress.

In the aftermath of the controllers strike, FAA developed analytical models for estimating the number of specialists required to control traffic safely. The application of these models to particular locations became a source of controversy between FAA and the controllers union. The committee formed to examine whether these models were sufficiently accurate for estimating staffing levels at specific locations determined that they could not be relied upon for this purpose. The models provide a useful starting point, but the staffing estimates they produce need to be adjusted on the basis of both local conditions and the norms that exist across FAA s workplaces. The committee recommended a process that FAA could follow to make these adjustments.

Topics

  • Industry and Labor — Workforce and Labor Issues

Table of Contents

skim chapter
Research Tools

Suggested Citation

National Research Council. Air Traffic Control Facilities: Improving Methods to Determine Staffing Requirements -- Special Report 250. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 1997.

Import this citation to:

Copyright Information

The National Academies Press (NAP) has partnered with Copyright Clearance Center's Rightslink service to offer you a variety of options for reusing NAP content. Through Rightslink, you may request permission to reprint NAP content in another publication, course pack, secure website, or other media. Rightslink allows you to instantly obtain permission, pay related fees, and print a license directly from the NAP website. The complete terms and conditions of your reuse license can be found in the license agreement that will be made available to you during the online order process. To request permission through Rightslink you are required to create an account by filling out a simple online form. The following list describes license reuses offered by the National Academies Press (NAP) through Rightslink:

  • Republish text, tables, figures, or images in print
  • Post on a secure Intranet/Extranet website
  • Use in a PowerPoint Presentation
  • Distribute via CD-ROM
  • Photocopy

Click here to obtain permission for the above reuses. If you have questions or comments concerning the Rightslink service, please contact:

Rightslink Customer Care
Tel (toll free): 877/622-5543
Tel: 978/777-9929
E-mail: customercare@copyright.com
Web: http://www.rightslink.com

To request permission to distribute a PDF, please contact our Customer Service Department at 800-624-6242 for pricing.

To request permission to translate a book published by the National Academies Press or its imprint, the Joseph Henry Press, please click here to view more information.

Related Books more

More by the Transportation Research Board more