TCRP Report 130: Shared Use of Railroad Infrastructure with Noncompliant Public Transit Rail Vehicles: A Practitioner's Guide
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TCRP Report 130:
Shared Use of Railroad Infrastructure with Noncompliant Public Transit Rail Vehicles: A Practitioner's Guide
(2009)
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Overview

Authors

Description

TRB's Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP) Report 130: Shared Use of Railroad Infrastructure with Noncompliant Public Transit Rail Vehicles: A Practitioner's Guide examines a business case for the shared use of non-Federal Railroad Administration-compliant public transit rail vehicles (e.g., light rail vehicles) with freight operations and highlights a business model for such shared-use operations. The report also explores potential advantages and disadvantages of shared-use operations and the issues and barriers that can arise in the course of implementation.

Topics

  • Transportation — Policy
  • Transportation — Public Transportation
  • Transportation — Railroads
  • Transportation — Administration and Management
  • Transportation — Law

Publication Info

122 pages | 8.5 x 11
Contents

Table of Contents

skim chapter
Front Matter i-xii
Research Objective 1-1
Report Output 2-2
Business Case 3-4
Train Control Technology 5-5
Grade Crossing Hazards 6-6
Requirements for Concurrent Shared-Track Operations 7-7
Practical Shortcuts 8-8
Advancing the Shared-Track Concept 9-9
Introduction 10-10
Reader's Guide to the Final Report 11-11
Scope of Work for Project A-27 12-12
Research Approach 13-13
Characteristics of a Shared-Track Corridor 14-14
Freight Operations Perspective 15-16
Why Share Track? 17-17
The Business Model 18-18
Business Model Structure 19-19
The Business Case 20-20
Shared-Track - A Practical Business Case Structure 21-22
Role of the Designated State Safety Organization 23-23
Methods for Risk Analyses 24-24
Equal Risks, Equivalent Safety 25-25
Underpinning the Case for Shared-Track 26-26
The Role of Command and Control Systems in Shared-Track 27-27
1) Train Control System Functions 28-28
2) Train Control System Design Parameters 29-29
4) Train Control - Emerging Technology - PTC and CBTC 30-30
System and Integration Testing - Vendor Role 31-31
8) Issues Unique to Train Control for Shared-Track 32-32
Auxiliary Safety Critical Systems 33-33
9) Fail-Safe Train Separation 34-35
2) Regulatory and Practical Requirements 36-37
4) Functional Design of a Communications System 38-38
2) Regulatory Mandates 39-39
4) The Rulebook 40-40
5) Rules and Procedures for Shared-Track 41-41
Background 42-42
2) Diesel Multiple Units and Electrical Multiple Units 43-43
2) Crash Energy Management (CEM) 44-44
3) Propulsion System 45-45
5) Other Considerations 46-46
Vehicles for Shared-Track Applications 47-47
3) Standardization 48-48
Applying Technology to Shared-Track Operations - A Brief Guide 49-50
Shared-Track Operations - The North American Experience 51-51
2) Former Private Freight Railroad Owner Becomes a Privileged Tenant 52-52
4) Pressure to Commingle Is Heaviest on Lines with Higher Freight Densities* - A Review of Different Solutions 53-53
6) Transit Operators Choosing to Avoid Commingling Sacrificed Service Quality and Efficiency 54-54
Business Case Template 55-55
Alternatives Analysis 56-56
Reasons to Consider Noncompliant Equipment 57-57
Service Characteristics to Justify the Choice of a Light Rail System 58-58
Structures Considerations 59-59
Cost and Ridership Analyses 60-60
Cost Analysis for Signal System Alternatives 61-62
System Capital Cost Assessment 63-63
System Operating Cost Assessment 64-65
Alternatives Evaluation 66-66
Introduction 67-67
Risk Analysis and Modeling Methodology 68-70
Results and Risk Analysis Findings 71-72
Safety Case Findings 73-73
San Diego Trolley 74-74
Achievable Incremental Steps 75-75
Practical Shortcuts For Shared-Track 76-76
Demonstration Project 77-77
Application of Risk Analyses Methodology to the Demonstration Project 78-78
Data Collection Plan 79-79
San Diego Trolley, Inc. 80-80
Barriers to Implementation 81-81
Shared Track - The Potential Market 82-82
Shared-Track Operation - An Evolving Concept 83-84
Bibliography 85-86
Appendix 1 - Abbreviations 87-87
Appendix 2 - Glossary of Shared-Track Definitions 88-92
Appendix 3 - TCRP A-27 Research Task Descriptions 93-97
Appendix 4 - Relative Cost Comparison of Train Control Systems 98-99
Appendix 5 - Sample Operating Rulebook Table of Contents 100-100
Appendix 6 - Vehicle Cost Drivers 101-101
Appendix 7 - Some Examples of Current Production LRV and MU Vehicle Types 102-105
Appendix 8 - Shared-Track System Status 106-106
Appendix 9 - Shared-Track Configuration and Operational Alternatives 107-109
Abbreviations used without definitions in TRB publications 110-110

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