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APPENDIX D Biographical Sketches, Pane' Members and Sew ALFRED BLUMSTEIN is J. Erik Jonsson professor of urban systems and operations research and director of the Urban Systems Institute in the School of Urban and Public Affairs, Carnegie-Mellon University. He is chair of the Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency, and he previously served as director of the Task Force on Science and Technology for the President's Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Justice. He is chair of the National Research Council's Committee on Research on Law Enforcement and the Administration of Justice and was chair of that committee's Panel on Research on Deterrent and Incapacitative Effects. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science; a member of the Law & Society Association, the American Society of Criminology, and the In- ternational Society of Criminology; past president of the Operations Research Society of America; and associate editor of several journals. He received a bachelor of engineering physics degree and a PhD degree in operations research from Cornell University. SYLVIA BACON is associate judge of the District of Columbia Superior Court. Previously she was an assistant U.S. attorney for the District of Columbia and assistant director of the District of Columbia Crime Com- mission, and she was the U.S. delegate to the Fifth United Nations Congress on Prevention of Crime. She is the author of Report of the President's Commission on Crime in District of Columbia (1967~. She is chair of the Criminal Justice Section of the American Bar Association 311

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312 Appendix B and a past member of the Association's Commission on Corrections, the National Commission on Criminal Justice Standards and Goals, and the Law Enforcement Assistance Administration Task Force on Juvenile Justice. She received a BA degree from Vassar College, an LLB degree from Harvard Law School, and an LLM degree from Georgetown Uni- versity Law Center. RICHARD A. BERK is professor of sociology at the University of Cal- ifornia, Santa Barbara. His research is concerned with evaluation re- search, the sociology of law, and applied econometrics. He is coauthor of A Measure of Justice (1977), Prison Reform and State Elites (1977), and Money, Work, and Crime: Experimental Evidence (1981~. He is a member of the American Sociological Association, the American Eco- nomics Association, and the American Statistical Association and of the editorial boards of several journals. He received a BA degree from Yale University and a PhD degree from Johns Hopkins University. JONATHAN D. CASPER is professor of political science at the University of Illinois, Urbana. Previously he was associate professor of political science at Stanford University. His research involves civil and political rights in the United States; plea bargaining in criminal courts; and de- fendant attitudes toward defense attorneys, judges, and prosecutors. He is the author of American 'Criminal Justice: The Defendant's Perspective (1972) and The Implementation of the California Determinate Sentencing Law (1982~. He is a member of the American Political Science Asso- ciation and of the board of trustees of the Law & Society Association. He received a BA degree from Swarthmore College and MA and PhD degrees from Yale University. JOHN C. COFFEE, JR., is professor of law at Columbia University Law School. Previously he was on the faculty of the Georgetown University Law Center. His research in criminal law concerns sentencing and parole and white-collar or organizational crime. He is vice-chair of the Com- mittee on Sentencing, Parole and Pardon Procedures of the American Bar Association. He received a BA degree from Amherst College and an LLB degree from Yale University Law School. SHARI SEIDMAN DIAMOND is associate professor of psychology and criminal justice at the University of Illinois, Chicago. Her research in- volves judicial and jury decision making and methodological problems in the study of law. She is a member of the American Psychological Association, the American Psychology-Law Society, the board of trust-

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Appendix B 313 ees of the Law & Society Association, and the editorial boards of several journals. She received a BA degree from the University of Michigan and an MA degree in psychology and a PhD degree in social psychology from Northwestern University. FRANKLIN M. FISHER is professor of economics, Massachusetts Insti- tute of Technology. His research concerns price theory, particularly stability theory, industrial organization, and econometrics. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences; a fellow and past council member of the Econometric Society; and a member, past vice-president, and past president of the American Economic Association. He received AB, MA, and PhD degrees from Harvard University. DON M. GO11FREDSON is dean and professor of the School of Criminal Justice, Rutgers University. Previously he was director of the National Council on Crime and Delinquency. His research concerns decision making in criminal justice, prediction methods, and program evaluation. He is coauthor of Classification for Parole Decision Policy (1978), Guide- lines for Parole and Sentencing (1978), Dec~sionmaking in Criminal Jus- tice (1980), and Screening for Risk: A Comparison of Methods (1981~. He is a member of the American Society of Criminology, the American Psychological Association, the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences, the Advisory Council of the National Institute of Criminal Justice, and the New Jersey Corrections Advisory Council and a fellow of the Na- tional Center for Juvenile Justice. He received a BA degree from the University of California, Berkeley, and MA and PhD degrees in psy- chology from Claremont Graduate School. JOSEPH B. KADANE is professor of statistics and social sciences at Carnegie-Mellon University, and he previously also served as head of the department of statistics. His teaching and research interests center on the use of quantitative methods in various social sciences and in statistical theory. He is an elected fellow of the American Statistical Association, the Institute of Mathematical Statistics, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science and an elected member of the International Statistical Institute. He received a BA degree in math- ematics from Harvard University and a PhD degree in statistics from Stanford University. NORVAL MORRIS is Julius Kreeger professor of law and criminology at the University of Chicago, and he previously served as dean of the Law School. His research concerns the criminal justice system. He is

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314 Appendix B the author of The Future of Imprisonment (1974) and Madness and the Criminal Law (1982~. He is a fellow of the American Bar Foundation, a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Police Board of the City of Chicago, and a member of the Board of Governors of the Chicago Bar Foundation. He received LLB and LLM degrees from the University of Melbourne, Australia, and a PhD degree in law and criminology from the University of London. DAVID J. ROTHMAN is director of the Center for the Study of Society and Medicine and Bernard Schoenberg professor of social medicine at Columbia University. His research focuses on the history of institutions for deviant and dependent people, particularly incarcerative institutions. He is coauthor of Doing Good: The Limits of Benevolence (1978) and the author of The Discovery of the Asylum: Social Order and Disorder in the New Republic (1971), Conscience and Convenience: The Asylum and Its alternatives in Progressive America (1981), and The Willowbrook Wars (1983~. He received a PhD degree in history from Harvard Uni- versity. RUTH L. RUSHEN is director of the California Department of Correc- tions. Previously she served as vice-chair and member of the California Board of Prison Terms. Her work involves corrections (probation, pa- role, and institutions), social welfare, human relations, and community development. She is a member of the American Correctional Associ- ation, the American Probation and Parole Association, the California Probation, Parole and Correctional Association, the Black Probation Officers Association, the California Black Corrections Coalition, the board of directors of the Southern California Alumni in Public Admin- istration, and the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. She received a BA degree in social studies from Clarke College and an MPA degree from the University of Southern California. JAMES Q. WILSON is Henry Lee Shattuck professor of government at Harvard University. He is the author of Varieties of Police Behavior (1973), Thinking About Crime (1975), and The Investigators: Managing the FBI and Narcotics Agents (19784. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a member of the board of directors of the Police Foundation. He received a BA degree from the University of Redlands and a PhD degree from the University of Chicago. SUSAN E. MARTIN, who served as study director of the Panel on Sen- tencing Research, is senior research associate with the Committee on

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Appendix B 315 Research on Law Enforcement and the Administration of Justice, and she previously served as study director of the Panel on Research on Rehabilitative Techniques and as research associate with the Panel on Legislative Impact on the Courts. She is the author of "Breaking and Entering": Policewomen on Patrol (1980~. Her research interests include police, career criminals, and public policy. She is a member of the American Sociological Association, the Society for the Study of Social Problems, the American Society of Criminology, and the Law & Society Association. She received a BA degree from Swarthmore College, an MS degree in education from the University of Rochester, and a PhD degree in sociology from American University. JACQUELINE COHEN is associate director of the Urban Systems In- stitute and research associate in the School of Urban and Public Affairs, Carnegie-Mellon University. Her research concerns quantitative meth- ods (including econometrics and stochastic processes), criminal careers, and incapacitation). She is a member of the Law & Society Association, the Operations Research Society of America, the American Society of Criminology, and the American Sociological Association. She received BS and MA degrees from the University of Pittsburgh and a PhD degree in urban and public affairs from Carnegie-Mellon University. MICHAEL H. TONRY is associate professor at the University of Mary- land School of Law. Previously he was a visiting fellow at the University of Chicago Law School, director of the sentencing guidelines project in the Center for Studies in Criminal Justice at the University of Chicago Law School, and he practiced corporate financial law. His research focuses on criminal law, consumer protection, and commercial law. He is coeditor of Crime and Justice An Annual Review of Research. He received a BA degree from the University of North Carolina and an LLB degree from Yale University Law School.