Biographical Sketches

CATHERINE LORD (Chair) is a professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Michigan and the director of the university’s Autism and Communication Disorders Center. The center provides direct assessments to families of children with autistic spectrum disorders and consultations to schools and early childhood programs. She is a clinical psychologist with interests in diagnosis, social and communication development, and intervention in autism spectrum disorders. She is best known for her work in longitudinal studies of children and adults with autism and the development of diagnostic measures used in both practice and research. Previously, she worked at the University of Chicago, the University of North Carolina, the University of Minnesota, the University of Alberta, the London Medical Research Council Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Unit, and Harvard University (Children’s Hospital).

MARIE BRISTOL-POWER is Special Assistant for Autism in the Office of the Director of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). She is also coordinator of the NICHD/NIDCD Network on the Neurobiology and Genetics of Autism: Collaborative Programs of Excellence in Autism (CPEAs), ten sites that involve more than 25 universities and more than 2,000 in research on the etiology, pathophysiology, brain structure and function, and developmental course of autism spectrum disorders. Prior to joining the National Institutes of Health, she was on the faculty of the School of Medicine at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.



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Educating Children with Autism Biographical Sketches CATHERINE LORD (Chair) is a professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Michigan and the director of the university’s Autism and Communication Disorders Center. The center provides direct assessments to families of children with autistic spectrum disorders and consultations to schools and early childhood programs. She is a clinical psychologist with interests in diagnosis, social and communication development, and intervention in autism spectrum disorders. She is best known for her work in longitudinal studies of children and adults with autism and the development of diagnostic measures used in both practice and research. Previously, she worked at the University of Chicago, the University of North Carolina, the University of Minnesota, the University of Alberta, the London Medical Research Council Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Unit, and Harvard University (Children’s Hospital). MARIE BRISTOL-POWER is Special Assistant for Autism in the Office of the Director of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). She is also coordinator of the NICHD/NIDCD Network on the Neurobiology and Genetics of Autism: Collaborative Programs of Excellence in Autism (CPEAs), ten sites that involve more than 25 universities and more than 2,000 in research on the etiology, pathophysiology, brain structure and function, and developmental course of autism spectrum disorders. Prior to joining the National Institutes of Health, she was on the faculty of the School of Medicine at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

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Educating Children with Autism Her work has focused on research and clinical care in autism, including policy issues and the integration of research and practice. JOANNE M.CAFIERO is a special education consultant and augmentative communication and assistive technology specialist. She is a faculty member of the Department of Special Education at Johns Hopkins University. She also consults with several school systems in developing state-of-the-art, eclectic, assistive technology programs for children with autism spectrum disorders, and she supports practitioners and families whose lives involve children with autism. She is currently conducting research on how children with severe communication impairments and autism learn literacy and language, what models for instruction are most effective, and how to apply research data to practice. PAULINE A.FILIPEK is associate professor in residence of pediatrics and neurology at the College of Medicine at the University of California, Irvine (UCI), codirector of the UCI Autism Research Project. She is a child neurologist who has specific clinical and research interests in the developmental disorders, particularly autism. She codeveloped a method of using magnetic resonance imaging to investigate developmental brain anomalies in developmental disorders, primarily autism, learning disabilities, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. She was the chair of the American Academy of Neurology/Child Neurology Society (AAN/ CNS) committee that established the Practice Parameter: Screening and Diagnosis of Autism, and will reconvene another AAN/CNS committee in fall 2001 to establish the Practice Parameter: Treatment of Autism. JAMES J.GALLAGHER is a Kenan professor of education and senior investigator at the Frank Porter Graham Child Development Center at the University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill. He was the first director of the Bureau of Education for the Handicapped in the U.S. Office of Education and also Deputy Assistant Secretary for Planning, Research and Evaluation in the U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. He served for 17 years as director of the Frank Porter Graham Center at UNC-Chapel Hill. He has served as the president of the Council for Exceptional Children and is the senior author of a popular textbook Educating Exceptional Children, now in its tenth edition. SANDRA L.HARRIS is a professor in the Department of Clinical Psychology of the Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology at Rutgers University, and the founder and executive director of the Douglass Developmental Disabilities Center at Rutgers. The center provides services for people with autism across the life span. Her primary

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Educating Children with Autism research and clinical activities involve the treatment of autism and other severe developmental disabilities. In addition to the use of behavioral techniques for the treatment of autism, she also trains the parents and families of children and adolescents with autism in the use of applied behavioral analysis technology and provides family support resources. ALAN M.LESLIE is a professor of psychology and cognitive science, Department of Psychology and Center for Cognitive Science, at Rutgers University. He directs the Cognitive Development Laboratory at Rutgers, New Brunswick, where his current research focuses on normal and abnormal cognitive development. Formerly, he was a Medical Research Council Senior Scientist at the University of London, England, where he originated the ‘theory of mind’ impairment hypothesis for autism. He has been a Leverhulme European Scholar, a visiting professor at University of California-Los Angeles, University of Chicago, and the Free University of Madrid. He sits on the editorial boards of several cognitive science journals, and is on the advisory board of the Association for Science in Autism Treatment. GAIL G.MCGEE is an associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Emory University School of Medicine. Her work emphasizes research and treatment applications of incidental teaching procedures to children with autism and her current research focuses on early autism intervention, language acquisition, and typical and atypical social behavior. She directs the Emory Autism Resource Center, Georgia’s statewide autism center, which provides interdisciplinary training, family support, and diagnosis and treatment to children and adults with autism. She also founded and directs the Walden Early Childhood Programs, which offer enriched early education to toddlers, preschoolers, and pre-kindergarten-aged children with autism who are included with a majority of typical peers. JAMES MCGEE is a study director and senior research associate at the National Academies’ National Research Council (NRC), with the Board on Behavioral, Cognitive, and Sensory Sciences. He also supports other NRC panels and committees in the areas of applied psychology and education. Prior to joining the NRC, he held scientific, technical, and management positions in applied psychology at IBM, RCA, General Electric, General Dynamics, and United Technologies corporations. He has also taught undergraduate and graduate courses in general, developmental, and applied psychology at several colleges; is certified as a secondary education teacher of social studies; and has taught at both the elementary and secondary levels.

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Educating Children with Autism SAMUEL L.ODOM is Otting professor of special education in the School of Education at Indiana University in Bloomington. His research has examined approaches to promoting the social competence of young children with autism, classroom ecology in inclusive early childhood settings, and effective practices in early childhood special education. His educational background is in special education, applied behavior analysis, and developmental psychology. SALLY J.ROGERS is a professor of psychiatry at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center and adjunct professor of psychology at the University of Denver. The body of her research has focused on the development of cognitive and social processes of infants and young children with developmental disabilities, including autism, mental retardation, and blindness. She has also provided clinical care to families and children throughout her career. Her current research is focused on defining the early phenotype and developmental course of autism, as well as examining effects of early intervention. FRED R.VOLKMAR is professor of child psychiatry in the child study center of the Yale University School of Medicine. His research is broadly focused on issues of developmental psychopathology in children with severe disturbances of development, including autism and mental retardation. His current research studies include the neuropsychology, family genetics, and neuroanatomical correlates of higher functioning autism and Asperger’s syndrome. AMY WETHERBY is an L.L.Schendel professor of communication disorders at Florida State University and executive director of the Florida State University Center for Autism and Related Disabilities. She has had over 20 years of clinical experience in the design and implementation of communication programs for children with autism and severe communication impairments and is a fellow of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. Her research has focused on communicative and cognitive-social aspects of language problems in children with autism, and more recently, on the early identification of children with communicative impairments. She is a coauthor of the Communication and Symbolic Behavior Scales (with Barry Prizant).

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