TABLE 3-2 Mammography Use—Women 40 Years of Age and Older (Health United States, 2001)

 

Percent of Women Having a Mammogram in the Past 2 Years

 

1987

1990

1991

1993

1994

1998

White, Non-Hispanic

30.3

52.7

56.0

60.6

61.3

68.0

Black, Non-Hispanic

23.8

46.0

47.7

59.2

64.4

66.0

Hispanic

18.3

45.2

49.2

50.9

51.9

60.2

Health United States, 2001. Department of Health and Human Services. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics.

between major ethnic and racial groups. Table 3-2 presents the proportion of women over age 40 who had mammograms in the previous 2 years between 1987 and 1998. A large gap in 1987 between African-Americans and whites had nearly disappeared by 1998, while the Hispanic to non-Hispanic gap had narrowed markedly, but remained. There were many changes in the environment, as well as a wide variety of other interventions operating during this period. Thus, the narrowing of the gaps may have many causes. Still, “Once A Year for A Lifetime,” described in the Annex, is among those interventions that operated during this period. It is not possible to suggest how much of the closing of the gap, if any, can be attributed to the campaign. Still, it is a first step to be able to report an association between the period of the campaign and the period of the closing of the gap. Specific claims of attribution will need more elaborate evidence.

CONCLUSIONS

This review of the communication campaign literature has produced a variety of findings, some of which are assertions about



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