TABLE 4–1 Sample Scoring Guide for the BEAR Assessment

 

Evidence and Trade-offs (ET) Variable

 

Using Evidence:

Using Evidence to Make Trade-offs:

Score

Response uses objective reason(s) based on relevant evidence to support choice.

Response recognizes multiple perspectives of issue and explains each perspective using objective reasons, supported by evidence, in order to make choice.

4

Response accomplishes Level 3 AND goes beyond in some significant way, such as questioning or justifying the source, validity, and/or quantity of evidence.

Response accomplishes Level 3 AND goes beyond in some significant way, such as suggesting additional evidence beyond the activity that would further influence choices in specific ways, OR questioning the source, validity, and/or quantity of evidence and explaining how it influences choice.

3

Response provides major objective reasons AND supports each with relevant and accurate evidence.

Response discusses at least two perspectives of issue AND provides objective reasons, supported by relevant and accurate evidence, for each perspective.

2

Response provides some objective reasons AND some supporting evidence, BUT at least one reason is missing and/or part of the evidence is incomplete.

Response states at least one perspective of issue AND provides some objective reasons using some relevant evidence, BUT reasons are incomplete and/or part of the evidence is missing; OR only one complete and accurate perspective has been provided.

1

Response provides only subjective reasons (opinions) for choice and/or uses inaccurate or irrelevant evidence from the activity.

Response states at least one perspective of issue BUT only provides subjective reasons and/or uses inaccurate or irrelevant evidence.

0

No response; illegible response; response offers no reasons AND no evidence to support choice made.

No response; illegible response; response lacks reasons AND offers no evidence to support decision made.

X

Student had no opportunity to respond.

 

SOURCE: Roberts, Wilson, and Draney (1997, p. 9). Used with permission of the authors.

of the learner, representing relatively more or less of the competency that is common to the set of items and their responses. This can be summarized graphically as in Figure 4–2, where the latent construct variable θ (represented inside an oval shape in the figure to denote that it is unobservable) is thought of as potentially varying continuously from minus infinity to plus



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