Appendix

Biographical Sketches

ROBERT GLASER (Co-chair) is founder and former director of the Learning Research and Development Center, as well as professor in the Departments of Psychology and Education at the University of Pittsburgh. His research focuses on the development of thinking and problem-solving abilities, the assessment of subject matter learning, and the integration of cognitive science and educational measurement. His National Research Council (NRC) service has included membership on the Committee on Developments in the Science of Learning; the National Committee on Science Education Standards and Assessment; and the Committee on Research in Mathematics, Science and Technology Education. He received a Ph.D. in psychological measurement and learning theory from Indiana University.

JAMES W.PELLEGRINO (Co-chair) is Frank W.Mayborn Professor of Cognitive Studies at Vanderbilt University. As of September 2001 he will become Distinguished Professor of Cognitive Psychology and Education at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Previously he served as dean of Vanderbilt’s Peabody College of Education and as co-director of Vanderbilt’s Learning Technology Center. He has been engaged in research and development activities related to children’s and adults’ thinking and learning and the implications for assessment and instructional practice. His most recent work has focused on the uses of technology and media in creating meaningful learning and instructional environments. He served as chair of the NRC Committee for the Evaluation of NAEP and co-chair of the NRC Committee on Learning Research and Educational Practice, and currently is a member of the NRC Committee on Improving Learning with Information Technology. He received his Ph.D. in experimental and quantitative psychology from the University of Colorado.



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Knowing What Students Know: The Science and Design of Eduacational Assessment Appendix Biographical Sketches ROBERT GLASER (Co-chair) is founder and former director of the Learning Research and Development Center, as well as professor in the Departments of Psychology and Education at the University of Pittsburgh. His research focuses on the development of thinking and problem-solving abilities, the assessment of subject matter learning, and the integration of cognitive science and educational measurement. His National Research Council (NRC) service has included membership on the Committee on Developments in the Science of Learning; the National Committee on Science Education Standards and Assessment; and the Committee on Research in Mathematics, Science and Technology Education. He received a Ph.D. in psychological measurement and learning theory from Indiana University. JAMES W.PELLEGRINO (Co-chair) is Frank W.Mayborn Professor of Cognitive Studies at Vanderbilt University. As of September 2001 he will become Distinguished Professor of Cognitive Psychology and Education at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Previously he served as dean of Vanderbilt’s Peabody College of Education and as co-director of Vanderbilt’s Learning Technology Center. He has been engaged in research and development activities related to children’s and adults’ thinking and learning and the implications for assessment and instructional practice. His most recent work has focused on the uses of technology and media in creating meaningful learning and instructional environments. He served as chair of the NRC Committee for the Evaluation of NAEP and co-chair of the NRC Committee on Learning Research and Educational Practice, and currently is a member of the NRC Committee on Improving Learning with Information Technology. He received his Ph.D. in experimental and quantitative psychology from the University of Colorado.

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Knowing What Students Know: The Science and Design of Eduacational Assessment EVA L.BAKER is a professor in the Divisions of Psychological Studies in Education and Social Research Methodologies, and acting dean of the Graduate School of Education and Information Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles. She is also co-director of the Center for the Study of Evaluation. Her research focuses on the integration of teaching and measurement, including the design of instructional systems and new measures of complex human performances. She served on the NRC Panel on Data Confidentiality, the Committee on Title I Testing and Assessment, and the National Academy of Sciences Panel on Education Reform. She currently chairs the NRC’s Board on Testing and Assessment. She received an Ed.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles. GAIL P.BAXTER is a research scientist in the Center for Performance Assessment of the Educational Testing Service in Princeton, New Jersey. She has also served as an assistant professor in the School of Education at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Her work focuses on issues of assessment, particularly the quality and cognitive complexity of science performance assessments. Her service with the NRC includes membership on the Committee on the Evaluation of National and State Assessments of Educational Progress. She received a Ph.D. in education from the University of California, Santa Barbara. PAUL JOSEPH BLACK is an emeritus professor of science education at King’s College in London, England. He is chair of the International Commission on Physics Education and a vice-president of the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics. He was consultant to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) project on innovations in science, mathematics, and technology education in OECD member countries. His NRC service has included membership on the Board on Testing and Assessment, participation in a Working Group on Science Assessment Standards, and the NRC Committee on Classroom Assessment and the National Science Education Standards. He received a Ph.D. in physics from Cambridge University. NAOMI CHUDOWSKY is a senior program officer in the NRC’s Board on Testing and Assessment. She has also worked for the U.S. Department of Education and the Connecticut State Department of Education on the development of student assessments. She received a Ph.D. in educational psychology from Stanford University. CHRISTOPHER L.DEDE is Timothy E.Wirth Professor in Learning Technologies and co-director of the Technology in Education Program in the Harvard University Graduate School of Education. He has also served as a

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Knowing What Students Know: The Science and Design of Eduacational Assessment professor at George Mason University with a joint appointment in the Schools of Information Technology and Engineering and of Education. His research interests span technology forecasting and assessment, emerging technologies for learning, and leadership in educational innovation. He is currently working on developing educational environments based on virtual reality technology and innovative methods of assessing learner performance in such environments. He received an Ed.D. in science education from the University of Massachusetts. KADRIYE ERCIKAN is an assistant professor on the Faculty of Educational and Counseling Psychology and Special Education at the University of British Columbia. She has also served as a senior research scientist at CTB/ McGraw-Hill, where she designed, scaled, scored, and equated norm-referenced and criterion-referenced tests. Her research interests are in evaluation methods, psychometrics, and linking of results from different assessments. She received a Ph.D. in research and evaluation methods from Stanford University. LOUIS M.GOMEZ is an associate professor in the School of Education and Department of Computer Science at Northwestern University. His current research interests include the support of teaching and learning with computing and networking technology, applied cognitive science, shared computer-based workspaces, and human-computer interaction. He received a Ph.D. in psychology from the University of California, Berkeley. EARL B.HUNT is a professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Washington. His research and teaching interests are cognition, artificial intelligence, and mathematical models and techniques in social and biological sciences. His NRC service has included serving as vice-chair of the Personnel Systems Panel of the Strategic Technologies for the Army (STAR) Project and on the Board of Army Science and Technology. He received a Ph.D. in psychology from Yale University. DAVID KLAHR is a professor and former head of the Department of Psychology at Carnegie Mellon University. His current research focuses on cognitive development, scientific reasoning, and cognitively based instructional interventions in early science education. His earlier work addressed cognitive processes in such diverse areas as voting behavior, college admissions, consumer choice, peer review, and problem solving. He pioneered the application of information-processing analysis to questions of cognitive development and formulated the first computational models to account for children’s thinking processes. He received a Ph.D. in organizations and social behavior from Carnegie Mellon University.

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Knowing What Students Know: The Science and Design of Eduacational Assessment RICHARD LEHRER is professor of cognitive science and mathematics education at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. He is also associate director of the National Center for Improving Student Learning and Achievement in Mathematics and Science. His research focuses on children’s mathematical and scientific reasoning in the context of schooling. He received a Ph.D. in educational psychology and statistics from the University of New York, Albany. ROBERT J.MISLEVY is a professor in the Department of Measurement, Statistics, and Evaluation in the School of Education at the University of Maryland. Before joining the faculty at Maryland, he was a distinguished research scientist in the Division of Statistics and Psychometrics Research of the Educational Testing Service. His research focuses on applying recent developments in statistical methodology and cognitive research to practical problems in educational assessment. He is currently working on evidence centered designs for complex assessments, such as simulation-based tests and coached practice systems. He received a Ph.D. in methodology of behavioral research from the University of Chicago. WILLIE PEARSON, JR., is a professor of sociology as well as an adjunct in medical education at Wake Forest University. His research has centered on the career patterns of Ph.D. scientists (particularly African-Americans), human resource issues in science and engineering, science policy, and comparative family studies. His NRC service includes membership on the Committee on Women in Science and Engineering and the Committee on Education and Training for Civilian Aviation Careers. He received a Ph.D. in sociology from Southern Illinois University, Carbondale. EDWARD A.SILVER is a professor of mathematics education at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. He has also served as a professor of cognitive studies and mathematics education at the University of Pittsburgh and as a senior scientist at the Learning Research and Development Center. His research interests focus on the teaching, learning, and assessment of mathematics, particularly mathematical problem solving. His service with the NRC includes membership on the Mathematical Sciences Education Board and the Study Group on Guidelines for Mathematics Assessment. He received a Ph.D. in mathematics education from Teachers College of Columbia University. RICHARD F.THOMPSON is a professor and director of the program in neural, informational, and behavioral sciences at the University of Southern California. His expertise is in neuroscience and psychology, particularly neurophysiology, neuroanatomy, learning and memory, and sensation and per

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Knowing What Students Know: The Science and Design of Eduacational Assessment ception. He is a member on the National Academy of Sciences. His NRC service has included membership on the Commission of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education, the Committee on Techniques for the Enhancement of Human Performance, and the Committee on National Needs for Biomedical and Behavioral Research. He currently serves on the Board on Behavioral, Cognitive, and Sensory Sciences. He received a Ph.D. in psychobiology from the University of Wisconsin. RICHARD K.WAGNER is a professor of psychology at Florida State University. His research interests focus on theories of human intelligence and the acquisition of complex cognitive knowledge and skills. His work has addressed measurement issues and practical considerations involving assessment of constructs in the domains of language, reading, and intelligence. He served as a member of the NRC Committee on Goals 2000 and the Inclusion of Students with Disabilities. He received a Ph.D. in cognitive psychology from Yale University. MARK R.WILSON is a professor of measurement and assessment in the Graduate School of Education at the University of California, Berkeley. His research focuses on developing new psychometric models for analyzing data from theory-rich contexts; he is also concerned with the application of current measurement theory to more practical problems of testing and evaluation. He is a convenor of the Berkeley Evaluation and Assessment Research Center and is currently advising the California State Department of Education on assessment issues as a member of the Technical Study Group. He received a Ph.D. in measurement and educational statistics from the University of Chicago.

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