APPENDIX C
BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES

Iris R.Weiss (Chair) is president of Horizon Research, Inc. (HRI) in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Prior to establishing HRI in 1987, Dr. Weiss was senior research scientist at the Research Triangle Institute. Her activities have included directing national surveys of science and mathematics teachers; evaluating science and mathematics education projects and systemic reform efforts; and providing technical assistance to agencies and professional organizations such as the U.S. Department of Education, American Association for the Advancement of Science, Council of Chief State School Officers, National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, National Science Teachers Association, and Office of Technology Assessment. She is currently directing the design and implementation of an 80-project cross-site evaluation of National Science Foundation’s Local Systemic Change Initiative; the development of a database of materials for the professional development of mathematics and science teachers; and an observational study of a sample of more than 400 mathematics and science classes throughout the United States. Dr. Weiss has a B.S. in biology from Cornell University, a master’s in science education from Harvard University, and a Ph.D. in curriculum and instruction from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

William Browder is a professor of mathematics at Princeton University and a member of the National Academy of Sciences. After teaching at the University of Rochester and Cornell Univer-



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Investigating the Influence of Standards: A Framework for Research in Mathematics, Science, and Technology Education APPENDIX C BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES Iris R.Weiss (Chair) is president of Horizon Research, Inc. (HRI) in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Prior to establishing HRI in 1987, Dr. Weiss was senior research scientist at the Research Triangle Institute. Her activities have included directing national surveys of science and mathematics teachers; evaluating science and mathematics education projects and systemic reform efforts; and providing technical assistance to agencies and professional organizations such as the U.S. Department of Education, American Association for the Advancement of Science, Council of Chief State School Officers, National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, National Science Teachers Association, and Office of Technology Assessment. She is currently directing the design and implementation of an 80-project cross-site evaluation of National Science Foundation’s Local Systemic Change Initiative; the development of a database of materials for the professional development of mathematics and science teachers; and an observational study of a sample of more than 400 mathematics and science classes throughout the United States. Dr. Weiss has a B.S. in biology from Cornell University, a master’s in science education from Harvard University, and a Ph.D. in curriculum and instruction from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. William Browder is a professor of mathematics at Princeton University and a member of the National Academy of Sciences. After teaching at the University of Rochester and Cornell Univer-

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Investigating the Influence of Standards: A Framework for Research in Mathematics, Science, and Technology Education sity, he joined the Princeton Mathematics Department in 1963, and served as chairman from 1971–73. He served as an editor of the Annals of Mathematics from 1969–81. Among the many visiting positions he has held are appointments at the universities of Oxford, Paris, Chicago, Northwestern, Aarhus, as well as the Institute for Advanced Study and the Max Planck Institute in Bonn. He was chairman of the Office of Math Sciences of the National Research Council from 1978–84. In this position, he organized the David Committee Study on the health of the mathematical sciences, as well as serving as chairman of the briefing panel for mathematics for the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. Dr. Browder has been elected to many offices in the American Mathematical Society including a member of the Council and vice president, and served as president from 1989–91. Dr. Browder received his undergraduate degree from MIT, and a Ph.D. from Princeton. Gail Burrill is a senior program officer and director of the Mathematical Sciences Education Board at the National Research Council. She was a secondary teacher and department chair in suburban Milwaukee, Wisconsin, for over 25 years and spent time as an associate researcher at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She is a past president of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. As an instructor for Teachers Teaching with Technology, she conducts workshops around the country on using technology in the classroom. Her honors include the Presidential Award for Excellence in Teaching Mathematics and the Wisconsin Distinguished Educator Award. She was elected a fellow of the American Statistical Association and was awarded an honorary doctorate degree from Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology. She was on the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards, is currently a member of the Advisory Board of the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation, and a director of the senior high school component of the Park City Mathematics Institute. The

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Investigating the Influence of Standards: A Framework for Research in Mathematics, Science, and Technology Education author of numerous books and articles on statistics and mathematics education, she has spoken nationally and internationally on issues in mathematics education. She has an undergraduate degree in mathematics from Marquette University and a master’s in mathematics from Loyola University of Chicago. Maria Alicia Lopez Freeman is the executive director of the California Science Project and the director for the Center for Teacher Leadership in Language and Status Issues. She has taught chemistry and physics in large urban inner-city high schools and served as department chairperson. For the past 10 years, she has been working in science professional development, science education research, and educational change. She is currently involved in science education research primarily through the development of case studies focused on teachers and students of color in science programs. She served on the National Commission on Mathematics and Science Teaching for the 21st Century. She was twice elected the chairperson of the California Curriculum Development and Supplemental Materials Commission, an advisory body to the California State Board of Education. She was actively involved with the development of the National Science Education Standards as a member of the Working Group on Science Teaching Standards. She served as a member of the committee on Adolescence and Young Adulthood Science Standards for the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards. She was appointed to the Expert Panel in Mathematics and Science Education for the U.S. Department of Education and served on the board of directors of BSCS. Ms. Lopez Freeman has a degree in chemistry and physics and a master’s degree in educational leadership and change from Immaculate Heart College. Michael Fullan is the dean of the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto. He has developed a number of partnerships designed to bring about major school

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Investigating the Influence of Standards: A Framework for Research in Mathematics, Science, and Technology Education improvement and educational reform. He participates as researcher, consultant, trainer, and policy advisor on a range of educational change projects with school systems, teachers’ federations, research and development institutes, and government agencies in Canada and internationally. Dr. Fullan is currently leading the evaluation team conducting a four-year assessment of England’s National Literacy and Numeracy Strategy. His most recent books are The New Meaning of Educational Change (3rd Edition) and Leading in a Culture of Change. He has a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Toronto. Margaret Goertz is a professor of education policy and a co-director of the Consortium for Policy Research in Education (CPRE) at the Graduate School of Education, University of Pennsylvania, where she directs the CPRE research program in education policy and governance. Over the past 20 years, she has studied education finance systems, with particular attention to education policy and intergovernmental relations, and to fiscal and programmatic equity and students with special needs. Her current research focuses on how states, school districts, schools, and teachers implement federal and state standards, assessment, and accountability policies. Dr. Goertz recently completed a study for the U.S. Department of Education of accountability policies in all 50 states and their interface with Title I policies, and a more in-depth study of how teachers, schools, and school districts implement state standards, assessment, and accountability policies in eight states and 23 school districts. She has published five books and more than three dozen chapters, articles, and monographs on education policy and education finance. Dr. Goertz has a Ph.D. in social science from the Maxwell School of Syracuse University. Karen S.Hollweg is senior program officer and directs the Committee on Science Education K-12 at the National Research Council. Prior to joining the NRC, she worked as a public school

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Investigating the Influence of Standards: A Framework for Research in Mathematics, Science, and Technology Education science teacher and district administrator and directed community-based education projects. As the principal investigator of many National Science Foundation grants, she has led the design, implementation, and dissemination of informal science education, teacher enhancement, and curriculum development projects. Ms. Hollweg has authored many books and articles about urban ecosystem education, scientist-teacher collaborations, and team-based professional development. She has served on advisory committees and boards of many national education projects and organizations, and has been a consultant on environmental education projects internationally. Ms. Hollweg has a B.A. in biology and a M.A. in science education from Stanford University. Michael S.Knapp is currently professor and chair, Educational Leadership and Policy Studies, at the University of Washington, and also director of the Center for the Study of Teaching and Policy, a national Research and Development Center supported by the U.S. Department of Education. Dr. Knapp’s teaching and research focuses on educational policy-making and policy implementation, the connections between policy and classroom practice or school improvement, and the ways education serves various populations, especially disenfranchised groups. Dr. Knapp’s research pays special attention to the influence of leadership and policy environments on the quality of teaching, the teacher workforce, and the development of teachers’ capacities. In both his working experience as a junior high school science teacher and as a policy researcher, Dr. Knapp’s work has often focused on mathematics and science education, and how it can be improved. Dr. Knapp has written extensively about his research, including several recent books, Teaching for Meaning in High-Poverty Classrooms and Paths to Partnership: University and Community as Learners in Interprofessional Education. Dr. Knapp received a Ph.D. in sociology of education from Stanford University.

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Investigating the Influence of Standards: A Framework for Research in Mathematics, Science, and Technology Education Paul LeMahieu is Hawaii’s State Superintendent. In the past, Dr. LeMahieu served as principal investigator for the Delaware Statewide Systemic Initiative for the reform of mathematics and science education, and served for 11 years as director of research, evaluation, and student assessment for the Pittsburgh (Pennsylvania) Board of Public Education. He has received major awards for his contributions to educational theory and practice from the American Educational Research Association, Evaluation Research Society, Buros Institute of Measurement, National Association of Test Directors, and Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Dr. LeMahieu has served as president of the National Association of Test Directors and vice president of the American Educational Research Association. He has degrees from Yale College (A.B., 1974), Harvard University (Ed.M., 1977), and the University of Pittsburgh (Ph.D., 1983). Mari Muri is a mathematics consultant for the Connecticut State Department of Education. Ms. Muri has been a co-principal investigator for Connecticut’s National Science Foundation State Systemic Initiative Award, the co-author of Mathematics Activities for Elementary School Teachers: A Problem Solving Approach, 4th Edition, and a member of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics writing team of Assessment Standards for School Mathematics, 1995. She has taught at the elementary school level and since 1985 at the postsecondary school level. Her awards include the Robert A. Rosenbaum Award for Excellence in Serving the Connecticut Mathematics Community from the Association of Teachers of Mathematics in Connecticut; Connecticut 1994 Educational Leader of the Year; and Who’s Who in American Education, 1993. She was a member of the Association of State Supervisors of Mathematics Executive Board from 1995–99, and its president from 1996–98. She has also been on the executive board of the Association of Teachers of Mathematics in Connecticut from 1988 to the present. Ms. Muri is a member of the National Educational Honor Societies and the

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Investigating the Influence of Standards: A Framework for Research in Mathematics, Science, and Technology Education Mathematical Sciences Education Board. She has been active in professional workshops, activities, presentations, and community service. She has a master’s degree in education from Eastern Connecticut State University and a Sixth-year Certificate in Educational Leadership from the University of Connecticut. Patrick M.Shields is director of the Center on Education Policy at SRI International. Dr. Shields is also currently director of research for Teaching and California’s Future, an examination of the status of the teaching workforce in the state and is co-director of the evaluation of the Pew Network for Standards-Based Reform. In these positions, he has had the opportunity to examine issues surrounding standards, teacher professional development, and assessment. Dr. Shields’ career has been devoted to research on efforts to improve schooling, especially for students at risk of failure. His most recent publications include When Theory Hits Reality: Standards-Based Reform in Urban Districts and The Status of the Teaching Profession 2000. Dr. Shields serves on the National Council of Mathematics Standards Impact Research Group. He holds a Ph.D. in educational policy from Stanford University. Judith Sowder is professor emerita of mathematical sciences at San Diego State University. She taught mathematics to elementary, middle, secondary, and college classes before earning a doctorate in 1976. Since then, she has focused on preparing teachers and graduate students in mathematics education and on research on learning and teaching mathematics. Dr. Sowder has received awards for teaching and research, most recently a Lifetime Achievement Award from the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. She has published over 40 papers in journals and proceedings, 20 book chapters, and four books, all on topics of mathematics learning and teaching. Dr. Sowder is the past editor of the Journal for Research in Mathematics Education, is currently co-principal investigator on an IERI grant on integrating mathematics and pedagogy, and is co-

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Investigating the Influence of Standards: A Framework for Research in Mathematics, Science, and Technology Education director of a newly established professional development collaborative. She has served on many national and international committees and advisory boards. Most recently, she served on the writing team of the new Conference Board of Mathematical Sciences book on the preparation of mathematics teachers, and now serves on the board of directors for the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. Dr. Sowder has directed numerous projects funded by the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Department of Education. She received her doctorate from the University of Oregon. Elizabeth K.Stage is director of mathematics and science professional development, educational outreach in the University of California Office of the President, responsible for grants to higher education campuses throughout the state. She has been a local and statewide director for some of these programs; has worked on state and national standards and assessments in mathematics and science; conducted research, program evaluation, and curriculum development at the Lawrence Hall of Science, University of California, Berkeley; and has taught at the elementary and middle school levels and at the graduate level at Berkeley and Harvard. Throughout these activities, she has been guided by a vision of high quality mathematics and science education for all students. She has an Ed.D. in science education from Harvard University. Kendall Starkweather is executive director of the International Technology Education Association (ITEA). As executive director, Dr. Starkweather is involved in activities designed to advance ITEA’s mission of promoting technological literacy in U.S. K-12 schools. He currently oversees the development of standards for technology education in ITEA’s Technology for All Americans project and is publisher of the association’s two journals, The Technology Teacher and Technology and Children. He has served as a member of the Board on Engineering Education at the National Research Council. His background includes high school teaching

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Investigating the Influence of Standards: A Framework for Research in Mathematics, Science, and Technology Education experience and nearly a decade of college-level preservice teacher education work. His efforts have been directed toward development of educational materials on problem-solving and technology and the impacts of technology on people and the environment. He holds a Ph.D. from the University of Maryland. P.Uri Treisman is professor of mathematics and director of the Charles A. Dana Center at The University of Texas at Austin. He serves as executive director of the National Science Foundation-funded Texas Statewide Systemic Initiative and is president of the board of the Consortium for Mathematics and Its Applications. For his research at the University of California at Berkeley on the factors that support high achievement among minority students in calculus, he received the 1987 Charles A. Dana Award for Pioneering Achievement in American Higher Education. In 1992, he was named a MacArthur Fellow and in December 1999, he was named as one of the outstanding leaders in higher education in the 20th century by the magazine Black Issues in Higher Education. Dr. Treisman serves on many national committees, boards, and commissions concerned with mathematics education. He has served on the National Research Council’s Coordinating Council for Mathematics, Science and Engineering Education and currently serves on the Committee on a Strategic Education Research Plan for the United States. He is an advisor to national groups including the Department of Defense’s Secondary Education Transition Study, which examines the consequences of high mobility among high-school-aged students in military families. He received his Ph.D. at the University of California at Berkeley in 1985. Marc Tucker is president of the National Center on Education and the Economy, a nonprofit organization based in Washington, DC. Mr. Tucker serves as co-director of New Standards, a national program to create internationally benchmarked academic standards and matching performance examinations for the schools. He served

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Investigating the Influence of Standards: A Framework for Research in Mathematics, Science, and Technology Education as staff director of the group that created the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards and as the Board’s first president. Mr. Tucker is co-author of Thinking for a Living: Education and the Wealth of Nations and of Standards for Our Schools: How to Set Them, Measure Them, and Reach Them. Mr. Tucker chairs the standards, assessment, and certification policy committee of the National Skill Standards Board. Prior to forming the National Center on Education and the Economy, Mr. Tucker served as associate director of the National Institute of Education, where he directed the Institute’s policy research program. Mr. Tucker holds an A.B. degree from Brown University.