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Biographical Sketches of Panel and Subcommittee Members

LENORE ARAB, Ph.D., is a professor of epidemiology and nutrition in the Departments of Epidemiology and Nutrition at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Schools of Medicine and Public Health. Dr. Arab’s main research interests are anticarcinogens in foods, heterocyclic amines, breast cancer incidence and survival, the relationship of diet to athersclerosis, antioxidant nutrients in various diseases, iron nutriture, and multi-media approaches to dietary assessment. She has published over 140 original papers as well as numerous book chapters and monographs. Dr. Arab serves as a nutrition advisor to the World Health Organization (WHO) and is the founding director of the WHO Collaborating Center for Nutritional Epidemiology in Berlin. She is the North American editor of the journal Public Health Nutrition and sits on the editorial boards of the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, Nutrition in Clinical Care, and Nutrition and Cancer: An International Journal. She is the program director for nutritional epidemiology and leader of a training program and National Cancer Institute-sponsored training grant in that field. Dr. Arab received her M.Sc. from Harvard School of Public Health and her Ph.D. in nutrition from Justus Liebig University in Giessen, Germany.

SUSAN I. BARR, Ph.D., is a professor of nutrition at the University of British Columbia. She received a Ph.D. in human nutrition from the University of Minnesota and is a registered dietitian in Canada. Her research interests focus on the associations among nutrition, physical activity and bone health in women, and she has authored



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Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Arsenic, Boron, Chromium, Copper, Iodine, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, Nickel, Silicon, Vanadium, and Zinc M Biographical Sketches of Panel and Subcommittee Members LENORE ARAB, Ph.D., is a professor of epidemiology and nutrition in the Departments of Epidemiology and Nutrition at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Schools of Medicine and Public Health. Dr. Arab’s main research interests are anticarcinogens in foods, heterocyclic amines, breast cancer incidence and survival, the relationship of diet to athersclerosis, antioxidant nutrients in various diseases, iron nutriture, and multi-media approaches to dietary assessment. She has published over 140 original papers as well as numerous book chapters and monographs. Dr. Arab serves as a nutrition advisor to the World Health Organization (WHO) and is the founding director of the WHO Collaborating Center for Nutritional Epidemiology in Berlin. She is the North American editor of the journal Public Health Nutrition and sits on the editorial boards of the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, Nutrition in Clinical Care, and Nutrition and Cancer: An International Journal. She is the program director for nutritional epidemiology and leader of a training program and National Cancer Institute-sponsored training grant in that field. Dr. Arab received her M.Sc. from Harvard School of Public Health and her Ph.D. in nutrition from Justus Liebig University in Giessen, Germany. SUSAN I. BARR, Ph.D., is a professor of nutrition at the University of British Columbia. She received a Ph.D. in human nutrition from the University of Minnesota and is a registered dietitian in Canada. Her research interests focus on the associations among nutrition, physical activity and bone health in women, and she has authored

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Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Arsenic, Boron, Chromium, Copper, Iodine, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, Nickel, Silicon, Vanadium, and Zinc over 65 publications. Dr. Barr has served as vice president of the Canadian Dietetic Association (now Dietitians of Canada) and is a Fellow of both the Dietitians of Canada and the American College of Sports Medicine. She is currently a member of the Scientific Advisory Board of the Osteoporosis Society of Canada, and the Medical Advisory Board of the Milk Processors Education Program. JOHN L. BEARD, Ph.D., is a professor of nutrition at the Pennsylvania State University. He received his B.S. from the Stevens Institute of Technology and holds a Ph.D. from Cornell University. Dr. Beard’s research interests are iron assessment, prevention of iron deficiency anemia, and impact of iron deficiency on brain metabolism and cognitive development. Dr. Beard was a member of the National Academy of Sciences’ Committee on Iron Requirements in Pregnant and Reproductive Age Women and Infants and a consultant for the Committee on Military Nutrition. Dr. Beard is also a member of the Steering Committee for the International Nutritional Anemia Consultative Group. GEORGE C. BECKING, Ph.D., is an associate with Phoenix OHC, Inc., Kingston, Canada, specializing in toxicology and risk assessment related to human health effects of chemicals. Previously, he was a scientist with the World Health Organization (WHO), Geneva working in the International Programme on Chemical Safety, and a research scientist and scientific manager at Health Canada. At WHO, his responsibilities included the evaluation of human health risks from a wide range of chemicals including the essential metals copper and zinc. At Health Canada, Dr. Becking worked as a research scientist with a major focus on the effects of nutrition on the metabolism and toxicity of chemicals. Dr. Becking earned his Ph.D. in biochemistry from Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario. He has published over 60 papers and book chapters in the fields of biochemistry, toxicology, and risk assessment methodology. SUSAN T. BORRA, R.D., is Senior Vice President and Director of Nutrition at the International Food Information Council. Ms. Borra is responsible for directing communications programs, executing public affairs strategies, and managing nutrition and food safety issues. Additionally, she oversees the development of consumer education materials and nutrition, food safety, and health programs. Ms. Borra is a member of the American Dietetic Association and is immediate past chair of the American Dietetic Association Foundation. In addition, she is active in the American Heart Association

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Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Arsenic, Boron, Chromium, Copper, Iodine, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, Nickel, Silicon, Vanadium, and Zinc and the Society for Nutrition Education. She has a bachelor’s degree in nutrition and dietetics from the University of Maryland and is a registered dietitian. ALICIA L. CARRIQUIRY, Ph.D., is an associate professor in the Department of Statistics at Iowa State University. She has a Ph.D. in statistics and animal science from Iowa State. Since 1990, Dr. Carriquiry has been a consultant for the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Human Nutrition Information Service. She has also done consulting for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the National Pork Producers Council, and is an affiliate for the Law and Economics Consulting Group. At present, Dr. Carriquiry is investigating the statistical issues associated with the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) and she has recently completed reports on improving the USDA’s food intake surveys and methods to estimate adjusted intake, and biochemical measurement distributions for NHANES III. Dr. Carriquiry is the president elect of the International Society for Bayesian Analysis, a fellow of the American Statistical Association, and an elected member of the International Statistical Institute. She is editor of Statistical Science, and serves on the Executive Committee of the Board of Directors of the National Institute of Statistical Science and of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics. Her research interests include nutrition and dietary assessment, Bayesian methods and applications, mixed models and variance component estimation, environmental statistics, stochastic volatility, and linear and nonlinear filtering. ROBERT J. COUSINS, Ph.D., is Boston Family Professor of Human Nutrition, and director of the Center for Nutritional Sciences at the University of Florida. He received his B.A. from the University of Vermont and his M.S. and Ph.D. from the University of Connecticut. He did postdoctoral research at the University of Wisconsin as a National Institutes of Health Fellow. Dr. Cousins’ major research interests focus on the molecular and cell biology of zinc absorption, transport, metabolism, and function. His professional honors and awards include the Osborne and Mendel Award and the Mead Johnson Award, both from the American Society for Nutritional Sciences; a MERIT Award from the National Institutes of Health; and numerous special named professorships. Dr. Cousins is a member of numerous scientific societies, including the American Society for Nutritional Sciences, American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, and Society for Toxicology. He served as president of both the Federation of American Societies for Experimental

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Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Arsenic, Boron, Chromium, Copper, Iodine, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, Nickel, Silicon, Vanadium, and Zinc Biology and the American Society for Nutritional Sciences, was an associate editor of the Journal of Nutrition, and is an associate editor of Annual Review of Nutrition. He has been a member of the Food and Nutrition Board since 1997, and the Standing Committee on the Scientific Evaluation of Dietary Reference Intakes since 1999. Dr. Cousins was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2000. BARBARA L. DEVANEY, Ph.D., is a senior fellow at Mathematica Policy Research Inc. where she has specialized in designing and conducting program evaluations. She recently completed a study that produced a comprehensive and rigorous evaluation design for evaluating the impacts of a Universal-Free School Breakfast Program on dietary and educational outcomes of children. She currently is completing an evaluation of the effects of an infant mortality demonstration program, Healthy Start, and is involved in a study examining the impacts on health care utilization and costs of child participation in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC). She also is a co-investigator of a large national evaluation of abstinence education programs funded under the welfare reform legislation. Dr. Devaney was a member of the Institute of Medicine’s Committee on Scientific Evaluation of WIC Nutrition Risk Criteria. She received her Ph.D. in economics from the University of Michigan. JOHN T. DUNN, M.D., is a professor of internal medicine at the University of Virginia School of Medicine. He holds an M.D. from Duke University. Dr. Dunn’s research interests include thyroid disease (goiter and cancer), iodine deficiency, and metabolism. Dr. Dunn is a member of the International Council for the Control of Iodine Deficiency Disorders. He has worked on various research and applied projects aimed at reducing iodine deficiency disorders in the developing world. JOHANNA T. DWYER, D.Sc., R.D., is director of the Frances Stern Nutrition Center at New England Medical Center and professor in the Departments of Medicine and of Community Health at the Tufts Medical School and School of Nutrition Science and Policy in Boston. She is also senior scientist at the Jean Mayer U.S. Department of Agriculture Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University. Dr. Dwyer’s work centers on life-cycle related concerns such as the prevention of diet-related disease in children and adolescents and maximization of quality of life and health in the elderly.

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Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Arsenic, Boron, Chromium, Copper, Iodine, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, Nickel, Silicon, Vanadium, and Zinc She also has a long-standing interest in vegetarian and other alternative lifestyles. Dr. Dwyer is currently the editor of Nutrition Today and on the editorial boards of Family Economics and Nutrition Reviews. She received her D.Sc. and M.Sc. from the Harvard School of Public Health, an M.S. from the University of Wisconsin, and completed her undergraduate degree with distinction from Cornell University. She is a member of the Food and Nutrition Board and the Standing Committee on the Scientific Evaluation of Dietary Reference Intakes, the Technical Advisory Committee of the Nutrition Screening Initiative, and past president of the American Society for Nutrition Sciences, past secretary of the American Society for Clinical Nutrition, and a past president of the Society for Nutrition Education. GUYLAINE FERLAND, Ph.D., is associate professor of nutrition at the University of Montreal and director of Clinical Research at L’Institut Universitaire de Gériatrie de Montréal. She earned her B.Sc. from McGill University and received her M.Sc. and Ph.D. from the University of Montreal. Dr. Ferland did her postdoctoral research in human vitamin K metabolism at Tufts University and now heads a research program in vitamin K metabolism at the University of Montreal. Dr. Ferland served on the scientific consultative council for the Canadian National Institute of Nutrition and is a member of the External Advisory Panel, Government Working Group for the Review of Policies Concerning the Addition of Vitamins and Minerals to Foods. JEAN-PIERRE HABICHT, M.D., Ph.D., is professor of nutritional epidemiology in the Division of Nutrition Sciences at Cornell University. His professional experience includes serving as special assistant to the director of the Division of Health Examination Statistics at the National Center for Health Statistics, World Health Organization (WHO) medical officer at the Instituto de Nutricion de Centro America y Panama, and professor of maternal and child health at the University of San Carlos in Guatemala. Currently, Dr. Habicht serves as an advisor to United Nations (UN) and government health and nutrition agencies. He is a member of the Expert Advisory Panel on Nutrition, WHO, and is past chairman of the UN Advisory Group on Nutrition. He has consulted to the UN’s World Food Program and is involved in research with the UN High Commission for Refugees about the adequacy of food rations in refugee camps. Dr. Habicht has served on numerous Institute of Medicine Committees advising the U.S. Agency for International Development about issues in international nutrition. He served as a member of the Food and Nutri-

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Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Arsenic, Boron, Chromium, Copper, Iodine, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, Nickel, Silicon, Vanadium, and Zinc tion Board (1981–1984) and as a member and past chair of the Committee on International Nutrition Programs. Dr. Habicht chaired the National Research Council’s Coordinating Committee on Evaluation of Food Consumption Surveys, which produced the 1986 report, Nutrient Adequacy: Assessment Using Food Consumption Surveys. K. MICHAEL HAMBIDGE, M.D., F.C.R.P., is professor emeritus of pediatrics and preventive medicine at the University of Colorado Medical Center. He received his B.A. and M.D. from Cambridge University. Dr. Hambidge has published numerous research articles on zinc metabolism and requirements during pregnancy and infancy. He received the American Institute of Nutrition Borden Award and the American Academy of Pediatrics Nutrition Award. He is a former member of the Food and Nutrition Board and served as liaison to the Committee on Scientific Evaluation of WIC Nutrition Risk Criteria. RENATE D. KIMBROUGH, M.D., presently works as an independent consultant. From 1991 to 1999 she served as senior medical associate at the Institute for Evaluating Health Risks (IEHR). She earned her M.D. from the University of Goettingen in Germany. At IEHR, Dr. Kimbrough conducted several studies and consulted on a variety of matters involving environmental contamination and human health effects. Dr. Kimbrough has served previously as the Director for Health and Risk Capabilities and as Advisor on Medical Toxicology and Risk Evaluation for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Office of the Administrator and as medical toxicologist for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. She has over 130 scientific publications in the fields of toxicology and risk assessment. Dr. Kimbrough is certified as a diplomate for the American Board of Toxicology and an honorary fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics. In 1991, she received the American Conference on Governmental Industrial Hygienists’ Herbert E. Stokinger Award for outstanding achievement in industrial toxicology. She also has served on the Scientific Advisory Board, United States Air Force, and the American Board of Toxicology. HARRIET V. KUHNLEIN, Ph.D., R.D., is professor of human nutrition at McGill University and founding director of the Centre for Indigenous Peoples’ Nutrition and Environment. She is a registered dietitian in Canada, and holds a Ph.D. in nutritional sciences from the University of California at Berkeley. The focus of Dr. Kuhnlein’s

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Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Arsenic, Boron, Chromium, Copper, Iodine, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, Nickel, Silicon, Vanadium, and Zinc research is on the nutrition, food patterns, and environment of indigenous peoples. Specifically, her work examines the traditional foods of indigenous peoples, nutrient and contaminant levels in indigenous food systems, and nutrition promotion programs for indigenous peoples. She has published numerous articles on these subjects. Dr. Kuhnlein is a member of both the American and Canadian Societies of Nutritional Sciences, the Society for International Nutrition Research, the Canadian Dietetic Association, and the Society for Nutrition Education. She serves on the Advisory Council of the Herb Research Foundation, and is a former co-chair of the committee on Nutrition and Anthropology of the International Union of Nutritional Sciences. Dr. Kuhnlein is a member of the editorial boards of Ecology of Food and Nutrition, Journal of Food Composition and Analysis, International Journal of Circumpolar Health, and Journal of Ethnobiology. SEAN LYNCH, M.D., is a professor of medicine at the Eastern Virginia Medical School. Dr. Lynch received his M.D. from the University of Witwatersrand, South Africa. He has published numerous reviews and research articles in the area of iron metabolism, anemia, and iron overload. Dr. Lynch is a consultant to the International Nutritional Anemia Consultative Group. RITA B. MESSING, Ph.D., received her Ph.D. in physiological psychology from Princeton University and did postdoctoral research in the Department of Nutrition and Food Science at Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the Laboratory of Neuroendocrine Regulation. Dr. Messing has been in the Department of Pharmacology, University of Minnesota Medical School since 1981, and is currently an associate professor. Since 1990 her primary employment has been at the Minnesota Department of Health in Environmental Toxicology, where she supervises the Site Assessment and Consultation Unit, which conducts public health activities at hazardous waste sites and other sources of uncontrolled toxic releases. Dr. Messing has 70 publications in toxicology and risk assessment, neuropharmacology, psychobiology, and experimental psychology. She has taught at Rutgers University, Northeastern University, University of California at Irvine, and University of Minnesota, and has had visiting appointments at Organon Pharmaceuticals in the Netherlands and the University of Paris. SANFORD A. MILLER, Ph.D., is dean of the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences and professor in the Departments of Biochemistry and Medicine at The University of Texas Health Science Center

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Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Arsenic, Boron, Chromium, Copper, Iodine, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, Nickel, Silicon, Vanadium, and Zinc at San Antonio. He is the former director of the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition at the Food and Drug Administration. Previously, he was professor of nutritional biochemistry at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Miller has served on many national and international government and professional society advisory committees, including the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology Expert Committee on GRAS Substances, the National Advisory Environmental Health Sciences Council of the National Institutes of Health, the Food and Nutrition Board and its Food Forum, the Joint World Health Organization/Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (WHO/FAO) Expert Advisory Panel on Food Safety (chairman), and the Steering Committees of several WHO/FAO panels. He also served as chair of the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Consultation on the Application of Risk Analysis to Food Standards Issues. He is author or co-author of more than 200 original scientific publications. Dr. Miller received a B.S. in chemistry from the City College of New York, and an M.S. and Ph.D. from Rutgers University in physiology and biochemistry. IAN C. MUNRO, Ph.D., is a consultant toxicologist and principal for CanTox, Inc. in Ontario, Canada. He is a leading authority on toxicology and has over 30 years experience in dealing with complex regulatory issues related to product safety. He has in excess of 150 scientific publications in the fields of toxicology and risk assessment. Dr. Munro formerly held senior positions at Health and Welfare Canada as director of the Bureau of Chemical Safety and director general of the Food Directorate, Health Protection Branch. He was responsible for research and standard setting activities related to microbial and chemical hazards in food and the nutritional quality of the Canadian food supply. He has contributed significantly to the development of risk assessment procedures in the field of public health, both nationally and internationally, through membership on various committees dealing with the regulatory aspects of risk assessment and risk management of public health hazards. Dr. Munro is a graduate of McGill University in biochemistry and nutrition and holds a Ph.D. from Queen’s University in pharmacology and toxicology. He is a fellow of the Royal College of Pathologists, London, and a fellow of the Academy of Toxicological Sciences. He also was a former director of the Canadian Centre for Toxicology at Guelph, Ontario. SUZANNE P. MURPHY, Ph.D., R.D., is a nutrition researcher (professor) at the Cancer Research Center of Hawaii at the University of

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Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Arsenic, Boron, Chromium, Copper, Iodine, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, Nickel, Silicon, Vanadium, and Zinc Hawaii, Honolulu. She received her B.S. in mathematics from Temple University and her Ph.D. in nutrition from the University of California at Berkeley. Dr. Murphy’s research interests include dietary assessment methodology, development of food composition databases, and nutritional epidemiology. She is a member of the National Nutrition Monitoring Advisory Council and the Year 2000 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee, and serves on editorial boards for the Journal of Nutrition, Journal of Food Composition and Analysis, Family Economics and Nutrition Review, and Nutrition Today. Dr. Murphy is a member of numerous professional organizations including the American Dietetic Association, American Society for Nutritional Sciences, American Public Health Association, American Society for Clinical Nutrition, and Society for Nutrition Education. She has over 50 publications on dietary assessment methodology and has lectured nationally and internationally on this subject. HARRIS PASTIDES, Ph.D., is dean of the University of South Carolina’s School of Public Health and professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics. Previously, he was chair and a professor of epidemiology in the Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology at the School of Public Health and Health Sciences at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. Dr. Pastides is a consultant to the World Health Organization’s Program in Environmental Health and a fellow of the American College of Epidemiology. He has published widely and is the co-author of several books. He was a Fulbright Senior Research Fellow and visiting professor at the University of Athens Medical School in Greece from 1987 to 1988. Dr. Pastides earned his M.P.H. and Ph.D. from Yale University; he has been a principal investigator or co-investigator on over 30 externally-funded research grants, results of which have been published in numerous peer-reviewed journals. He previously served on the National Academy of Sciences’ Committee on Pediatric Respiratory Infections in Developing Nations. JAMES G. PENLAND, Ph.D., is a research psychologist at the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agriculture Research Service, Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center and adjunct professor of psychology at the University of North Dakota. Since receiving his Ph.D. in experimental cognitive psychology from the University of North Dakota in 1984, Dr. Penland’s research has focused on determining the role of mineral element nutrition in neuropsychological function and behavior throughout the lifespan. He has conducted numerous metabolic unit and community-based feeding and sup-

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Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Arsenic, Boron, Chromium, Copper, Iodine, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, Nickel, Silicon, Vanadium, and Zinc plementation studies investigating a variety of minerals and functional outcomes, including zinc, iron, boron, and copper effects on cognitive performance; selenium effects on mood states; copper and iron effects on sleep behavior; and calcium and manganese effects on menstrual symptoms. He has also assessed the impact of boron, magnesium, zinc, copper and iron nutrition on brain electrophysiology. Computerized cognitive and psychomotor assessment methods developed by Dr. Penland have been used in collaborative nutrition studies with children and adults throughout the United States and in China, Guatemala, and New Zealand. Dr. Penland has served on several expert panels and scientific advisory groups, including the Food and Nutrition Board’s Committee on Military Nutrition Research. JOSEPH V. RODRICKS, Ph.D., is the managing director of The Life Sciences Consultancy LLC. He is one of the founding principals of the ENVIRON Corporation, with internationally recognized expertise in assessing the risks to human health of exposure to toxic substances. He received his B.S. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and his Ph.D. in biochemistry from the University of Maryland. Dr. Rodricks is certified as a diplomate of the American Board of Toxicology. Before working as a consultant, he spent 15 years at the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). In his final 3 years at FDA, he was Deputy Associate Commissioner for Science, with special responsibility for risk assessment. He was a member of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Board on Toxicology and Environmental Health Hazards, and has also served on or chaired ten other NAS committees. He has more than 100 scientific publications on food safety and risk assessment and has lectured nationally and internationally on these subjects. He is the author of Calculated Risks, a nontechnical introduction to toxicology and risk assessment. IRWIN H. ROSENBERG, M.D., is an internationally recognized leader in nutrition science who serves as professor of physiology, medicine and nutrition at the School of Medicine and School of Nutrition, as well as director, Jean Mayer U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging, and dean for nutrition sciences, all at Tufts University. He is the first holder of the Jean Mayer Chair in Nutrition at Tufts. Prior to joining Tufts, Dr. Rosenberg held faculty positions at the Harvard Medical School and University of Chicago where he served as the first director of the Clinical Nutrition Research Center. As a clinical nutrition investigator, he has helped develop a nutritional focus

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Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Arsenic, Boron, Chromium, Copper, Iodine, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, Nickel, Silicon, Vanadium, and Zinc within the field of gastroenterology with his primary research interest being in the area of folate metabolism. His research for the past decade has focused on nutrition and the aging process. Among his many honors are the Josiah Macy Faculty Award, Grace Goldsmith Award of the American College of Nutrition, Robert H. Herman Memorial Award of the American Society of Clinical Nutrition, Jonathan B. Rhoads Award of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, and 1994 W.O. Atwater Memorial Lectureship of the USDA. Dr. Rosenberg was elected to the Institute of Medicine in 1994 and in 1996 he received the Bristol Myers Squibb/ Mead Johnson Award for Distinguished Achievement in Nutrition Research. A. CATHARINE ROSS, Ph.D., is professor of nutrition and Dorothy Foehr Huck Chair at the Pennsylvania State University. She earned her B.S. at the University California, Davis and received her Ph.D. from Cornell University. Dr. Ross has published numerous research articles in the area of vitamin A metabolism and immunity. Her research on infection and inflammation has included developing methods for assessing vitamin A status during infection in humans. Dr. Ross is a member of the Food and Nutrition Board and received the Mead Johnson Award of the American Society of Nutritional Sciences. ROBERT M. RUSSELL, M.D., is professor of medicine and nutrition at Tufts University School of Medicine and associate director at the Jean Mayer U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging. Dr. Russell served on the Panel on Folate and Other B Vitamins. He has a B.S. from Harvard University and an M.D. from Columbia University. His primary work involves studying the effects of aging on gastrointestinal absorption of micronutrients, including vitamin A. He has served on many national and international advisory panels, including chairman of the USDA Human Investigative Committee, U.S. Pharmacopeia Convention, Food and Drug Administration, National Digestive Diseases Advisory Board, American Board of Internal Medicine, and is currently a vice-chair on the Food and Nutrition Board. He has worked on international programs in several countries including Vietnam, Iran, Iraq, Guatemala, China, and the Philippines. Dr. Russell serves on the editorial boards of various professional journals. He is a staff gastroenterologist/nutritionist at the New England Medical Center Hospitals.

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Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Arsenic, Boron, Chromium, Copper, Iodine, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, Nickel, Silicon, Vanadium, and Zinc BARBARA J. STOECKER, Ph.D, R.D., is professor and head of nutritional sciences at Oklahoma State University. She received her B.S. at Kansas State University and holds a Ph.D. from Iowa State University. Her research interest is chromium metabolism and requirements. Specifically, she has investigated chromium absorption, impact on diabetes, and drug interactions. Dr. Stoecker is a member of the American Society for Nutritional Sciences, Institute of Food Technologists, and past chair of the Research Dietetic Practice Group of the American Dietetic Association. JOHN W. SUTTIE, Ph.D., is the Katherine Berns Van Donk Steenbock Professor of in the Department of Biochemistry at the University of Wisconsin. He received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin. Dr. Suttie has published numerous research articles in the area of vitamin K action, metabolism, and nutritional importance. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, a member of the National Research Council’s Board on Agriculture and Natural Resources, and is the editor of the Journal of Nutrition. STEVE L. TAYLOR, Ph.D., serves as professor and head of the Department of Food Science and Technology and director of the Food Processing Center at the University of Nebraska. He also maintains an active research program in the area of food allergies through the Food Allergy Research and Resource Program at the University of Nebraska. He received his B.S. and M.S. in food science and technology from Oregon State University and his Ph.D. in biochemistry from the University of California at Davis. Dr. Taylor’s primary research interests involve naturally occurring toxicants in foods, especially food allergens. His research involves the development of immunoassays for the detection of residues of allergenic foods contaminating other foods, the effect of processing on food allergens, and the assessment of the allergenicity of genetically engineered foods. Dr. Taylor has over 160 publications. He is a member of numerous professional associations including Institute of Food Technologists; American Chemical Society; American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology; and Society of Toxicology. JOHN A. THOMAS, Ph.D., received his undergraduate degree at the University of Wisconsin and his M.A. and Ph.D. at the University of Iowa. He has held professorships in departments of pharmacology and toxicology in several medical schools including Iowa, Virginia, and West Virginia. From 1973 to 1982 he served as associate dean of the School of Medicine at West Virginia University. In 1982

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Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Arsenic, Boron, Chromium, Copper, Iodine, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, Nickel, Silicon, Vanadium, and Zinc Dr. Thomas became Vice President for Corporate Research at Baxter Healthcare. Dr. Thomas served as vice president at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio from 1988 to 1998. He serves on several editorial boards of biomedical journals and serves as chairman of the Society of Toxicology Education Committee, chairman of the Expert Advisory Committee of the Canadian Network of Toxicology Centers, and vice president of the Academy of Toxicology. He is a diplomate, fellow, and member of the Board of Trustees in the Academy of Toxicological Sciences, and serves on many scientific boards and committees in the chemical and the pharmaceutical industry. He has received many awards, including the 1999 Distinguished Service Award from the American College of Toxicology, the Merit Award from the Society of Toxicology, Certificate of Scientific Service (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency), Distinguished Lecturer in Medical Sciences (American Medical Association), and the Distinguished Service Award from the Texas Society for Biomedical Research. He is an elected foreign member of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences. Dr. Thomas is the author of over a dozen textbooks and research monographs and has published over 350 scientific articles. JUDITH R. TURNLUND, Ph.D, R.D., is a research nutrition scientist at the U.S. Department of Agriculture Western Human Nutrition Research Center and an adjunct professor in the Department of Nutrition, University of California at Davis. She earned her B.S. at Gustavus Adolphus College and holds a Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley. Her research interests include human requirements for and bioavailability of trace elements (zinc, copper, molybdenum, and iron) and nutrition and aging. Dr. Turnlund received the American Institute of Nutrition Lederle Award for outstanding accomplishments in human nutrition. KEITH P. WEST, Dr.P.H., R.D., is professor of human nutrition at the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health. He received his B.S. from Drexel University, earned his Dr.P.H. from the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health, and holds an R.D. from Walter Reed General Hospital. Dr. West recently headed two large community trials in Nepal to understand the impact of vitamin A interventions on the prevention of morbidity and mortality in women, children, and infants. In addition to vitamin A, Dr. West’s research interests include nutritional epidemiology and dietary and anthropometric assessment. Dr. West is a member of the International Vitamin A Consultative Group.

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Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Arsenic, Boron, Chromium, Copper, Iodine, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, Nickel, Silicon, Vanadium, and Zinc GARY M. WILLIAMS, M.D., is a professor in the Department of Pathology and Director of Environmental Pathology and Toxicology at New York Medical College. He also serves as head of the Program on Medicine, Food and Chemical Safety. Previously, Dr. Williams served as director of the Naylor Dana Institute and chief of the Division of Pathology and Toxicology at the American Health Foundation. He earned his M.D. from the University of Pittsburgh. Dr. Williams has received numerous honors including the Arnold J. Lehman Award of the Society of Toxicology and the Sheard-Sandford Award of the American Society of Clinical Pathologists. He has served on the editorial boards for many scientific reports and journals. He is the author or co-author of over 430 scientific publications. He previously served on the Committee on Research Opportunities and Priorities for Environmental Protection Agency and the Committee on the carcinogenicity of Cyclamates for the National Academy of Sciences. STANLEY H. ZLOTKIN, M.D., Ph.D., is a professor in the Departments of Pediatrics and Nutritional Sciences at the University of Toronto, senior scientist and medical director of nutrition support, and chief of the division of gastroenterology and nutrition at the Hospital for Sick Children. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Toronto, his M.D. from McMaster University, and his FRCP(C) from McGill University. His research interests include improved methods for assessing iron status and interventions to prevent iron deficiency anemia in infants and young children. Dr. Zlotkin has served as a consultant on nutrition issues to the Canadian Federal and Provincial Government and as past chairman of the Nutrition Committee of the Canadian Pediatric Society. Currently, he is the nutrition advisor for the International Life Sciences Institute’s Food and Nutrition Safety Committee.