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Appendixes



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Page 369 Appendixes

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Page 370

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Page 371 Appendix A Committee and Staff Biographies COMMITTEE Richard B. Johnston, Jr., (Chair) is currently Professor of Pediatrics at National Jewish Medical and Research Center and University of Colorado School of Medicine. Until January 1999, he was Medical Director of the March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation and Chief of the Section of Immunology in the Department of Pediatrics at Yale University School of Medicine. Among his previous appointments is the position of Chairman of Pediatrics, University of Pennsylvania. He is a member of the Association of American Physicians and the Institute of Medicine and a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. His publications include work on immune diseases in children and mechanisms of host defense and inflammation. Dr. Johnston is a past president of the Society for Pediatric Research and the American Pediatric Society. Dr. Johnston is a member of the Board on Health Promotion and Disease Prevention of the IOM and has chaired four IOM committees, including the Committee for Assessment of Asthma and Indoor Quality and the Vaccine Safety Committee. He has served on several other IOM committees, including the Committee to Review Adverse Consequences of Pertussis and Rubella Vaccines and the Immunology Benchmarking Guidance Group. Jack P. Antel is a clinical neurologist involved in a major multiple sclerosis research and treatment center at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital. He is a Professor at McGill University where he has served as Chairman of the Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery. He has served on editorial boards

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Page 372for numerous neurological journals and on advisory boards for such organizations as the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, the American Neurological Association, and the Multiple Sclerosis Society of Canada. Prior to his work at McGill, Dr. Antel was Professor of Neurology at the University of Chicago. His interests include interactions between the immune and central nervous systems and inflammatory demyelinating disorders, including multiple sclerosis. Samuel Broder is the Executive Vice President of Celera Genomics, whose mission it is to become the definitive source of genomic and information. He is the former director of the National Cancer Institute at NIH and worked there for 23 years as an investigator and administrator. Dr. Broder is a Fellow of the American College of Physicians, a member of the Institute of Medicine, American Society for Clinical Investigation, Association of American Physicians, American Association of Immunologists, and the Clinical Immunology Society and serves on the editorial advisory boards of numerous journals. His expertise includes research management in government and industry, the development of anti-retroviral drugs, and cancer biology. Dr. Broder served on the IOM Forum on Drug Development. Jesse M. Cedarbaum is Vice President of Clinical Affairs at Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc., and Clinical Associate Professor of Neurology at Mount Sinai Medical School. His expertise includes clinical research, biostatistics, regulatory affairs, clinical pharmacology and pharmacokinetics and toxicology. His areas of clinical research interests and activities have included Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, peripheral neuropathy, and retinal degenerative disorders. Prior to joining Regeneron in 1990, Dr. Cedarbaum was Director of the Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorder program at New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center in New York, and the Burke Rehabilitation Center in White Plains, NY, and Associate Clinical Professor of Neurology at Cornell Medical School from 1983 to 1990. Dr. Cedarbaum received his B.A. and M.A. from Stanford University and his M.D. from Yale Medical School. Patricia K. Coyle is Professor of Neurology and Director of the Stony Brook Multiple Sclerosis Comprehensive Care Center at SUNY Stony Brook. Her areas of expertise include neurologic infectious disease, in particular Lyme disease and multiple sclerosis. She is actively engaged in multiple sclerosis therapeutic trials and studies to elucidate neurologic Lyme disease. She is a member of many committees of the American Academy of Neurology, American Neurological Association and National Multiple Sclerosis Society, and has been an expert adviser to the Food and Drug Administration. Stephen L. Hauser has served as Chairman and Betty Anker Fife Professor of Department of Neurology at the University of California, San Francisco since

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Page 3731992. Dr. Hauser's research has focused on the immunologic and genetic aspects of multiple sclerosis. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Associations of Physicians, is past President of the Medical Staff at UCSF, and serves as an editor of the medical textbook Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine. Dr. Hauser was elected to the Institute of Medicine in 1999. Lisa I. lezzoni is Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and CoDirector of Research in the Division of General Medicine and Primary Care, Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston. She has conducted numerous studies for the Health Care Financing Administration, the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research, and private foundations on a variety of topics, including the use of clinical data to predict hospitalization costs and patient outcomes, comparing severity of illness across teaching and non-teaching hospitals, evaluating the utility of severity information for quality assessment, and using information from hospital data systems to predict patient clinical and functional outcomes and satisfaction with care. A 1996 recipient of The Robert Wood Johnson Investigator Award in Health Policy Research, she is studying disability policy and its implications for patients' lives. Dr. Iezzoni is on the editorial boards of major medical and health services research journals, and she serves on the National Committee on Vital Statistics. Dr. lezzoni served on the IOM Committee to Advise the National Library of Medicine on Information Center Services, and the Committee on the Role of Institutional Review Boards in Health Services Research Data Privacy Protection, and was elected to the Institute of Medicine in 2000. Suzanne T. Ildstad is Director of the Institute for Cellular Therapeutics and Professor of Surgery, Department of Surgery at the University of Louisville. With Dr. David Sachs, she established the model for mixed hematopoietic stem cell chimerism. After a pediatric surgery/transplant surgery fellowship in Cincinnati, Dr. Ildstad joined the faculty at the University of Pittsburgh. Her research on mixed chimerism to induce tolerance to organ allografts and treat nonmalignant diseases such as sickle cell anemia and autoimmune disorders is currently being applied clinically in six Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Phase I trials. Dr. Ildstad holds several patents related to her research in expanding bone marrow transplantation to treat nonmalignant diseases by optimizing the risk-benefit ratio through graft engineering and partial conditioning. She is the founding scientist of Chimeric Therapies, Inc., a biotechnology company focused on bone marrow graft engineering, and she serves on the board of directors of the company. Dr. Ildstad has been a member of the Institute of Medicine since 1997 and served on the IOM Committee on Organ Procurement and Transplantation. Sharon L. Juliano is Professor of Anatomy and Cell Biology and Neuroscience at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. She has been a

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Page 374guest researcher at the NIMH and the INSERM in Creteil, France, served on a number of Advisory Committees for the NIH and Society for Neuroscience, won several research related awards, and is a member of editorial boards. Her research focuses on the development and plasticity of neocortex and the role of radial glia and Cajal Retzius cells in neuronal migration. She also studies the influence of neuronal migration on subsequent formation and processing within the cerebral cortex and the role of specific neurotrophins in neocortical plasticity. Donald L. Price is Professor of Pathology, Neurology and Neuroscience and Director of the Division of Neuropathology at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. Trained in neurology, neuropathology, and cell/molecular biology, Dr. Price's principle research interests are in the mechanisms of human neurodegenerative diseases, like Alzheimer's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). He and his collegues at Johns Hopkins have used transgenic strategies to introduce mutant genes into mice to reproduce the clinical, pathological, and biochemical phenotypes of AD, ALS, parkinsonism, and trinucleotide repeat expansion diseases in mice. These mice are being used to understand the pathogenic processes leading to these disorders. In addition, the Hopkins group has knocked out key genes/products relevant to these illnesses, work that has provided insights into therapeutic targets. Strategies effective in mice can be brought to clinical trials. He was elected to the Institute of Medicine in 1998, and is President-Elect of the Society for Neuroscience. Raymond P. Roos is Professor and Chairman of the Department of Neurology at the University of Chicago. His main clinical interests are multiple sclerosis, CNS viral infections, and neurodegenerative disease. A basic goal of his studies is to use molecular techniques to better understand the pathogenesis of these diseases. He is interested in the pathogenesis of unconventional viral infections of the central nervous system, molecular determinants of neurovirulence and persistence of experimental viral infections in animals, and virus vectors in central nervous system gene delivery for use as neurobiological research tools and as a means for gene therapy. Alan J. Thompson is Professor of Clinical Neurology and Neurorehabilitation in the Department of Clinical Neurology, Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London, Medical Director of the NeuroRehabilitation Unit and Research and Development Director at the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Queen Square, London (affiliated with the University College of London). He is National Medical Advisor to the MS Society of Great Britain, President of ECTRIMS (European Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis), European editor of the journal Multiple Sclerosis, and past-President of RIMS (Rehabilitation in Multiple Sclerosis). His main research interests are in the mechanisms underlying disability in neurological disorders, including mul-

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Page 375tiple sclerosis and spinal cord disease. He is currently applying MR techniques to look at mechanisms underlying disability and recovery in MS. He has also been active in the application of outcome measures and the evaluation of rehabilitation in neurological disorders. Stephen G. Waxman is Professor and Chair of the Department of Neurology at Yale Medical School. He also holds appointments as Professor of Neurobiology and Pharmacology at Yale University; Neurologist-in-Chief at Yale-New Haven Hospital; and Director of the Neuroscience Research Center, Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, West Haven. Dr. Waxman serves as co-director of the Yale London collaboration in nervous system repair. He has served on numerous scientific advisory committees including the Advisory Boards of the American Paralysis Association, Veterans Administration, the Spinal Cord Research Foundation, the Board of Scientific Counselors of NINDS, and on the Board of Neuroscience and Behavioral Health of the IOM. Dr. Waxman has published more than 300 scientific papers, has authored two books, and has edited five books on neuroscience. He is editor of The Neuroscientist, and serves on the editorial boards of over a dozen scientific journals. Dr. Waxman was elected to the IOM in 1996, and serves on the IOM's Board on Neuroscience and Behavioral Health. Hartmut Wekerle is Director of the Max Planck Institute for Neurobiology, and Chairman of the Biological Medical Section. He was formerly the head of the Clinical Research Unit for Multiple Sclerosis. Dr. Wekerle has served on the advisory boards of research organizations such as the European Committee for Multiple Sclerosis, the European Charcot Foundation for Multiple Sclerosis Research, the International Federation of MS Societies, the German Multiple Sclerosis Society, the Italian Multiple Sclerosis Association, the UK National MS Society, and the Robert Koch Minerva Center for Research in Autoimmune Diseases. He has served on the editorial boards of such journals as Multiple Sclerosis, Brain Pathology, European Journal of Immunology, and Journal of Autoimmunity. His research focuses on functional interactions between nervous and immune systems, including pathogenic autoimmune responses against neural, modulation of neuronal function by immune mediators, and neuronal control of immune reactivity. STAFF Janet E. Joy is a Senior Program Officer in the Division on Neuroscience and Behavioral Health of the Institute of Medicine at the National Academies where she has been since 1994. She has served as study director for Academy reports on intellectual property rights in molecular biology, resource management, and medi-

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Page 376cal uses of marijuana. Before coming to work at the National Academies she conducted research in neural control of biological rhythms. John A. Rockwell is a Research Assistant in the Division on Neuroscience and Behavioral Health. He has been with the Institute of Medicine since 1999. He has a B.S. in Kinesiology from the College of William and Mary, and an M.S. in Human Nutrition, Foods and Exercise from Virginia Tech. John's master's thesis assessed the effects of short-term energy restriction on muscle fuel stores and exercise performance. Amelia B. Mathis is a Project Assistant/Senior Secretary in the Division on Neuroscience and Behavioral Health. She has 6 years of experience working at the National Academies and the Institute of Medicine. She has provided support on several Institute of Medicine projects, and her main responsibility is to handle logistical arrangements for meetings and travel for committee members and staff.