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TABLE 9.1 Employment by Major Industry Division, 1986, 1996, and Projected 2006 (after Franklin, 1997)

Thousands of Jobs

Percent Distribution

Industry

1986

1996

2006

1986

1996

2006

Totala

111,374

132,352

150,927

100.0

100.0

100.0

Nonfarm wage and salarya

98,727

118,731

136,318

88.6

89.7

90.3

Goods producing

24,538

24,431

24,451

22.0

18.5

16.2

Mining

778

574

443

.7

.4

.3

Construction

4,810

5,400

5,900

3.3

3.1

3.9

Manufacturing

18,951

18,457

18,108

17.0

13.9

12.0

Durable

11,200

10,766

10,514

10.1

8.1

7.0

Nondurable

7,751

7,691

7,593

7.0

5.8

5.0

Service producing

74,189

94,300

111,867

66.6

71.2

73.1

Transportation, commnications, utilities

5,247

6,260

7,111

3.7

3.7

3.7

Wholesale trade

5,751

6,483

7,228

5.2

3.9

3.8

Retail trade

17,878

21,625

23,875

16.1

16.3

15.8

Finance, insurance and real estate

6,275

6,899

7,651

5.6

5.2

5.1

Servicesb

22,346

33,586

44,852

20.1

25.4

29.7

Federal government

2,899

2,757

2,670

2.6

2.1

1.8

State and local government

13,794

16,690

18,480

12.4

12.6

12.2

Agriculturec

3,327

3,642

3,618

3.0

2.8

2.4

Private household wage and salary

1,235

928

775

1.1

.7

.5

Nonagricultural self-employed and unpaid family workersd

8,085

9,051

10,216

7.3

6.8

6.8

aEmployment data for wage and salary workers are from the BLS Current Employment Statistics (payroll) survey, which counts jobs, whereas self-employed, unpaid family worker, agricultural, and private household data are from the Current Population Survey (household survey), which counts workers.
bExcludes SIC 074,5,8 (agricultural services) and 99 (nonclassifiable establishments), and is therefore not directly comparable with data published in Employment and Earnings.
cExcludes government wage and salary workers, and includes private sector SIC 08.09 (forestry and fisheries).
dExcludes SIC 08.09 (forestry and fisheries).

It can be seen that white-collar executive, managerial, and professional jobs are increasing along with technical, marketing, and service work. However, a decline is expected in the number of more physical jobs associated with agriculture, precision production, and operator/fabricator/ laborer. Even so, Silvestri (1997) suggests that approximately 26 percent



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