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Appendix Biographies A.1 COMMITTEE MEMBERS KENNETH H. KELLER, Chair, directs the Center for Science, Technol- ogy, and Public Affairs at the University of Minnesota. He also holds an appointment in the Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science. His research examines the intersection of science and technology with international politics and economics. His recent writings have dealt with technology and national sovereignty, the environment, the global- ization of research and development, and policy issues in high technol- ogy medicine. He has spent most of his career at the University of Minne- sota where he joined the faculty in 1964, became vice president for academic affairs in 1980, and University president in 1985. He was senior fellow for science and technology at the Council on Foreign Relations from 1990 to 1996. He has chaired and served on a number of public and pri- vate boards and advisory groups and is a member of the Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Applications of the National Re- search Council, and the boards of RAND's Institute for Education and Training and the Science Museum of Minnesota. He chairs the Medical Technology Leadership Forum and is vice chair of the board of LASPAU: Academic and Professional Programs for the Americas. He earned a master's degree and doctorate in chemical engineering from Johns Hopkins University, and was named a distinguished Johns Hopkins alum- nus in 1996. KENNETH W. DAM is Max Pam Professor of American and Foreign Law at the University of Chicago Law School. Mr. Dam was elected to the 233

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234 GLOBAL NETWORKS AND LOCAL VALUES Order of the Coif while at the Law School; he was also a managing editor of the Law Review. In 1964, he was visiting professor at the University of Freiburg. Mr. Dam has published five books: Federal Tax Treatment of For- eign Income (with Lawrence Krause); The GATT: Law and International Eco- nomic Organization; Oil Resources: Who Gets What How?; Economic Policy Beyond the Headlines (with George Shultz); and The Rules of the Game: Re- form and Evolution in the International Monetary System. He was law clerk to Supreme Court Justice Whittaker and then an associate with the New York firm of Cravath, Swaine and Moore. He joined the Law School faculty in 1960, but in 1971 he left to become assistant director of the Office of Man- agement and Budget, where he was concerned with national security and international affairs. In 1973, he was executive director of the Council on Economic Policy, which was responsible for coordination of U.S. domes- tic and international economic policy. He returned to the University of Chicago Law School in 1974. He served as provost of the university from 1980 to 1982. He served as deputy secretary of state from 1982 to 1985 and then as vice president for law and external relations with IBM from 1985 to 1992. In 1992, he took leave from IBM to serve, on an interim basis, as president and CEO of the United Way of America in order to clean up a scandal in that organization and to put into place a new system of con- trols and governance. In early 2001 he was nominated by President Bush to be Deputy Secretary of the Treasury, and he is currently on a leave of absence from the Law School. PAUL A. DAVID is professor of Economics at Stanford University, and, since 1994, also holds a Senior Research Fellowship at All Souls College, Oxford. He currently is Extraordinary Professor of the Economics of Sci- ence and Technology in the Faculty of Economics and Business Adminis- tration at the University of Maastricht. Paul David is known internation- ally for his contributions in several fields, including economic history, economic and historical demography, and the economics of science and technology. The development of "the new economics of science" has been a focal point of his most recent research and writings, and he continues to direct the High Technology Impact Program of the Center for Economic Policy Research at Stanford. He has served as a consultant to the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, the United Nations Commission on Trade and Development, the United Nations University Institute on New Tech- nologies, the World Bank, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, and other public organizations. KENNETH KENISTON is Andrew W. Mellon Professor of Human De- velopment and Director of Projects in the Program in Science, Technol- ogy, and Society at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is the

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APPENDIX 235 author of seven books and more than 100 articles and chapters. His most recent works are, with D. Guston, The Fragile Contract (1994), and with I. Ker Conway and L. Marx, Earth, Air, Fire, Water: Humanistic Studies of the Environment. He is the Director of the MIT India Project at MIT, a part of the MIT International Science and Technology Initiative (MISTI). In re- cent years, Professor Keniston's research focused on information tech- nology and development in India. His research in India focuses on such topics as Indic language software (or the absence therofl, and on Indian projects and research to close the "digital divide" within India and be- tween India and the so-called Northern nations. In the fall of 1999, he was Sir Ashutosh Mukerjee Visiting Professor at the National Institute of Advanced Studies at the Indian Institute of Science in Bangalore; he has lectured at a number of Indian institutions including IIT-Chennai, IIT-Mumbai, the Confederation of Indian Industries, and private firms. He was a member, Carnegie Commission on Higher Education (1964- 1971~; director, Behavioral Sciences Study Center, Yale Medical School (1967-1971~; chairman and director, Carnegie Council on Children (1971- 1977), author of its report, All Our Children; and member, Board of Over- seers of Harvard University (1973-1979~; Guggenheim Fellow for study of engineering education (1982~; evaluator, Guggenheim Foundation for Latin American applicants (1988-~; member, Committee of Selection for the MacArthur Prize Fellowships (1973-1979~; member, Committee of Selection for the Guggenheim Fellowships (1991-1994~. He has been a Visiting Scholar at the Ecole des Mines (Paris); Visiting Professor at the University of ParisV (Sorbonne); Visiting Professor at the Centro de Estudios Avanzados de Ciencias Sociales (Madrid). He has been a con- sultant on a number of projects in Venezuela, Kuwait, Mendoza (Argen- tina), Malaysia, Politecnico of Torino, Italy, Petroleum Institute in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia. He is currently a member of the National Re- search Council/Max-Planck-Institute (American-German) working group on Global Networks and Local Values. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Keniston was educated in part at the Colegio Nacional de Buenos Aires (Central). He graduated magna cum laude from Harvard College, with a thesis on the political philosophy of Jose Ortega y Gasset. He received his D. Phil. in Social Studies from Oxford University, where he was a Rhodes Scholar at Balliol College. He has taught at Harvard University, where he was a Junior Fellow; in the Departments of Psy- chology and Psychiatry at Yale University; and at the Massachusetts In- stitute of Technology, where he has been Director (1986-1992) and Di- rector of Graduate Studies (1992-1996) of the Program in Science, Technology, and Society.

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236 GLOBAL NETWORKS AND LOCAL VALUES HENRY H. PERRITT, JR., is dean of Chicago-Kent College of Law and vice president of the Downtown Campus of Illinois Institute of Technol- ogy. He is the author of more than 70 law review articles and 15 books on technology and law and employment law, including the 730-page Law and the Information Superhighway. He served on President Clinton's Transi- tion Team, working on telecommunications issues, and drafted principles for electronic dissemination of public information, which formed the core of the Electronic Freedom of Information Act Amendments adopted by Congress in 1996. During the Ford Administration, he served on the White House staff and as deputy under secretary of labor. He serves on the Com- puter Science and Telecommunications Policy Board of the National Re- search Council. He was a member of the interprofes-sional team that evaluated the FBI's Carnivore system. He is a member of the Bars of Vir- ginia, Pennsylvania, the District of Columbia, Maryland, Illinois and the United States Supreme Court. He is a member of the Council of Foreign Relations and of the Economic Club and is secretary of the Section on Labor and Employment Law of the American Bar Association. He earned his B.S. in engineering from MIT in 1966, a master's degree in manage- ment from MIT's Sloan School in 1970, and a I.D. from Georgetown Uni- versity Law Center in 1975. ROBERT SPINRAD retired from XEROX Corporation, as Vice President of Technology Strategy in 1998. He joined Xerox in 1968, and over the years has held a variety of computer science positions, including that of Director of Xerox PARC (Palo Alto Research Center). Before his career with Xerox, Spinrad was a Senior Scientist at Brookhaven National Labo- ratory and Project Engineer at Bulova Research and Development Labo- ratory. Spinrad received a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from the Mas- sachusetts Institute of Technology. He received his M.S. in Electrical Engineering, and B.S. in Engineering from Columbia University. Spinrad was a Bridgham Fellow at Columbia and a Whitney Fellow at MIT. Spinrad has served in various advisory and oversight roles at Harvard University, Stanford University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technol- ogy, the University of California, EDUCOM, the National Science Foun- dation, the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of En- gineering, the National Research Council, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Council on Library and Information Resources, the Council on Foreign Relations, Bell Telephone Laboratory, the Defense Department's Advanced Research Projects Agency, Livermore National Laboratory, the RAND Corporation, the Interna- tional Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, Digital Pathways, Inc., the McGraw-Hill Encyclopedia of Science and Technology, and The In- formation Society. Spinrad is on the Board of Advisors for the Berkeley

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APPENDIX 237 Center for Law and Technology and on the National Reconnaissance Office Advisory Council. He is also a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the National Research Council's United States/la- pan Task Force on Corporate Innovation. A.2 THE GERMAN DELEGATION CHRISTOPH ENGEL, Chair of the German Delegation, was born in 1956, and he took the first state exam for lawyers in 1981 at Tuebingen Univer- sity. After 2 years as assistant at the Tuebingen Law Faculty, he was for 9 years a research fellow of the Hamburg Max-Planck-Institute on foreign private law and conflicts of law. He took his second state exam for law- yers in 1987 and received a degree of doctor juris in 1988. In 1992, the University of Hamburg gave him tenure (habilitation) for public law, eco- nomic law, European law, and public international law. From 1992 through 1997, he held a chair for media and communications law at Osnabrueck University. Since 1997 he is co-director of a newly founded institution within the Max-Planck-Society, the Project Group on the Law of Common Goods at Bonn. His main fields are public law, economic law, media law, environmental law, and the impact of social sciences, in par- ticular economics, on law. He is a member of the Scientific Council with the German Minister of Economics. KLAUS W. GREWLICH is a professor in the European General and In- terdisciplinary Department at the College of Europe/Bruges. From 1990 to 1995 he served as Executive Vice President (Director General) Busi- ness Development and Board Representative at Deutsche Telekom, Bonn and from 1996 to 1997 as Director General and Member of the Board of an Industrial Confederation in Brussels. Dr. Grewlich has held posi- tions in the European Space Agency and in the OECD Madrid, in the Cabinet of the EC Commission in Brussels, and was Member of the For- eign Policy Planning Group and Director for International Technology and Telecommunications Policy in the Federal Foreign Office, Bonn. He received his Dr. fur. from the University of Freiburg, his Dr.sc.econ. from the University of Lausanne/HEC, and his LL.M. from the University of California, Berkeley. Dr Grewlich is the author of various publications, particularly in the field of international economic relations, public inter- national and European law, international technology policy, govern- ment-business relations, and communications, including the books Di- rect Investment in the OECD-Countries (1978), Transnational Enterprises in a New International System (1980), Europe in the Global Technology Race (1992), Conflict and Order in Global Communications (1997), and Governance in Cyberspace (1999~.

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238 GLOBAL NETWORKS AND LOCAL VALUES BERND HOLZNAGEL is a professor of law and director of the Institute for Information, Telecommunication and Media Law at the University of Munster, Germany. After completing his law and sociological studies at the Free University in Berlin in 1984, he participated in a post-graduate law program at McGill University in Montreal where he received a Mas- ter of Laws (LL.M.) degree in 1985. After receiving his Ph.D. from the University of Hamburg on Dispute Resolution through Negotiation in 1990 and passing the second state exam in law in 1991, he began to write his thesis, "Broadcasting Law in Europe," which was completed in 1996 and received a special award from the European Group at Public Law. In 1997 he was announced as professor for constitutional and administrative law at the University of Munster. In the same year he founded the Institute for Information, Telecommunication and Media Law. His involvement in research projects covers areas such as access problems in the multimedia age, legal frameworks of data protection and data security, and new me- dia in university teaching. In 1998 he was a visiting professor at the Uni- versity of Virginia (Charlottesville) teaching "European Community Law" in the fall term. Since 1999, he has been a faculty member of Oxford University's summer school for incoming law students. His consulting work on the international level includes media law courses in Moscow and Ljubljana (with the Council of Europe), as well as working as an ex- pert on the legal problems concerning Bosnian election law, residence law, data protection and I.D. cards (with the Phare Project financed by the Eu- ropean Commission). Furthermore, he was a member of the European Expert Group for the preparation of the Working Group "The Right Regu- latory Framework for a Creative Media Economy" at the April 1998 Bir- mingham Conference organised by the European Community. Currently he is a co-editor of the Law Journal "Multimedia and Law" and co-initia- tor of the "International Journal of Communications Law and Policy," which is a joint project of the Universities of Munster, Oxford, Warwick, and Yale. In addition, he has published numerous articles in several Ger- man law journals relating to various problems concerning German ad- ministrative law. MICHAEL MUTTER is professor of economic theory and director of the Institute for Economy and Culture at Witten/Herdecke University, the first private university in Germany. He received his Dr. rer.pol. with a summa-cum-laude thesis on the logical structure of property rights and his Dr. rer. pot. habit. with a study on the production of pharmaceutical patent law in Germany, Italy, and the United States. His current research interests focus on the role of communication in economic theory, and on applications of social systems theory on the economics of the Arts, media industries and networks, and monetary systems. Dr. Hutter was educated

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APPENDIX 239 at Portland State University (B.A. Math., 1970), University of Washington (M.A. Econ., 1971), and the University of Munich (Dr. rer. pot., 1976, and Dr. rer. pot. habit., 1986~. He taught at Claremont McKenna College and at the University of Munich before joining the faculty of Business Adminis- tration and Economics at Witten/Herdecke University in 1987. He was dean of the faculty from 1992-95, and he was president of the Association for Cultural Economics. He serves on the editorial board of the Journal of Cultural Economics, the European Journal of Law and Economics, and Soziale Systeme. He has published in the areas of cultural economics, his- tory and theory of money, history of economic thought and economic methodology. RAYMOND WERLE is principal research associate with the Max-Planck- Institut fur Gesellschaftsforschung, Koln (Max-Planck-Institute for the Study of Societies, Cologne). He is head of the MPI Research Group on Network Development and Standardization in Telecommunications. His research is focused on the institutional conditions and the structural con- sequences of technological and scientific innovations, in particular in the information and telecommunications technology industry. It includes the development of telecommunications and data networks, the Internet in particular, and their structural and societal consequences. He has pub- lished in the area of science and technology studies, development and governance of large technical systems, but also in the sociology of law and the legal profession and research methodology. He received a Di- ploma (M.A.) in Economics and Sociology and a Ph.D. in Political Science. He was educated at the Universities of Bonn, Cologne, Mannheim and at the State University of New York at Stony Brook (postgraduate DAAD fellow). He held research and teaching positions at the Universities of Bielefeld, Mannheim and Heidelberg and at the Research Center on Nuclear Energy in Karlsruhe. In 1997 he was Visiting Scholar at the Cen- ter for Technology, Policy and Industrial Development (Research Program on Communications Policy) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). He is chair of the Coordination Committee of the Research Net- work "Sociology of Science and Technology" (SSTNET) of the European Sociological Association. A.3 STAFF lOACHIM DOLKEN is a research assistant with the Max-Planck-Project Group on the Law of Common Goods at Bonn and currently enrolled in the preparatory program ("Rechtsreferendariat") for the second state exam for lawyers. He received his first law degree (r.D. equivalent) with a focus on commercial and competition law in 1995 from Osnabruck

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240 GLOBAL NETWORKS AND LOCAL VALUES University. Since 1992, he was a junior research assistant with the chair for the Law of the New Media at Osnabrueck University. From 1995-1996, he was a visiting scholar at the University of Chicago Law School (ERP- scholarship of the Ministry of Economics and the National Scholarship Foundation). His work is on antitrust law related to convergence in multi- media markets. HERBERT LIN is senior scientist and senior staff officer at the Com- puter Science and Telecommunications Board, National Research Council of the National Academies, where he has been study director of major projects on public policy and information technology. These studies include a 1996 study on national cryptography policy (Cryptography's Role in Securing the Information Society), a 1991 study on the future of computer science (Computing the Future), a 1999 study of Defense Department systems for command, control, communications, computing, and intelligence (Realizing the Potential of C4I: Fundamental Challenges), and a 2000 study on workforce issues in high-technology (Building a Workforce for the Information Economy). Prior to his NRC ser- vice, he was a professional staff member and staff scientist for the House Armed Services Committee (1986-1990), where his portfolio in- cluded defense policy and arms control issues. He also has significant expertise in math and science education. He received his Ph.D. in phys- ics from MIT in 1979. Apart from his CSTB work, he is published in cognitive science, science education, biophysics, and arms control and defense policy. LORENZ MULLER is Higher Executive Officer in the administration of the German Bundestag on temporary leave of absence. He was Research Assistant of the Parliamentary Study Commission "Future of the Media in the Economy and Society Germany's Road into the Information Soci- ety," which finished his work in tune 1998. After 4 years as a journalist, he studied law and arabic and Islamic studies in Hamburg and Damascus. He took his first and second state exam for lawyers in 1991 and 1995 in Hamburg and received a degree of doctor juris in 1996 with a thesis on the relationship between modern Islamic theory and the idea of human rights. Currently he is a Research Assistant with the Max-Planck-Project Group on the Law of Common Goods at Bonn. WOLF OSTHAUS, born in 1971, received his first law degree (J.D. equiva- lent) with a focus on international private law and comparison of law in 1997 from Osnabrueck University after studying at the Universities of Osnabrueck, Paris (XII), and Florence. He is a research assistant with the

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FEW 241 ax-F~nck-Fr~ect Croup on Me Lam of Common Coods at Bonn and also a meter of We Graduate College ~Internat10nalizat10n of private lam" at the Cnivershy of Fre~urg/Cermany (DFO scholarship). His Fh.D. Desist which is supervised by Frof. van Bar' Osn~rucck' ~111 be on me rights to 1nformat10n in the 1nternat10nal tort lam.

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