Appendix F

Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Joanne Zurlo (Chair) is Associate Director, Center for Alternatives to Animal Testing, Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health. Her research interests have been in the areas of chemical carcinogenesis, molecular biology, and in vitro toxicology. She has held faculty positions at Dartmouth Medical School in the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology and at Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences.

Adele Douglass is Director of Public Policy for the American Humane Association. She is experienced in public policy concerning the use of animals in research and in agriculture. She has a broad range of knowledge of animal welfare issues, including agriculture and biomedical research uses of animals and is a recognized expert on animal welfare and the public's perception of those issues.

Randall J. Nelson is a Professor in the Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, College of Medicine, University of Tennessee. He is a neuroscientist and an expert in the use of nonhuman primates. His studies concern the role of the somatosensory cortex in receiving peripheral sensory information, integrating it with various central inputs, and contributing to the control of movement.

William S. Stokes is Associate Director for Animal and Alternative Resources, Environmental Toxicology Program, NIEHS and co-chair of the Interagency Coordinating Committee on Validation of Alternative Methods. His research interests are toxicological methods, including development, validation, and acceptance of new animal models, and improved toxicological test systems.



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OCR for page 118
DEFINITION OF PAIN AND DISTRESS AND REPORTING REQUIREMENTS FOR LABORATORY ANIMALS: PROCEEDINGS OF THE WORKSHOP HELD JUNE 22, 2000 Appendix F Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Joanne Zurlo (Chair) is Associate Director, Center for Alternatives to Animal Testing, Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health. Her research interests have been in the areas of chemical carcinogenesis, molecular biology, and in vitro toxicology. She has held faculty positions at Dartmouth Medical School in the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology and at Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences. Adele Douglass is Director of Public Policy for the American Humane Association. She is experienced in public policy concerning the use of animals in research and in agriculture. She has a broad range of knowledge of animal welfare issues, including agriculture and biomedical research uses of animals and is a recognized expert on animal welfare and the public's perception of those issues. Randall J. Nelson is a Professor in the Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, College of Medicine, University of Tennessee. He is a neuroscientist and an expert in the use of nonhuman primates. His studies concern the role of the somatosensory cortex in receiving peripheral sensory information, integrating it with various central inputs, and contributing to the control of movement. William S. Stokes is Associate Director for Animal and Alternative Resources, Environmental Toxicology Program, NIEHS and co-chair of the Interagency Coordinating Committee on Validation of Alternative Methods. His research interests are toxicological methods, including development, validation, and acceptance of new animal models, and improved toxicological test systems.

OCR for page 118
DEFINITION OF PAIN AND DISTRESS AND REPORTING REQUIREMENTS FOR LABORATORY ANIMALS: PROCEEDINGS OF THE WORKSHOP HELD JUNE 22, 2000 Jerrold Tannenbaum is Professor of Population Health and Reproduction, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California at Davis. He did graduate work in philosophy at Rockefeller University and Cornell University and obtained his JD from Harvard Law School. He is the author of numerous papers on veterinary and animal law and ethics, has written Veterinary Ethics, the first and only comprehensive book on veterinary ethics, and has spoken on ethical and legal issues relating to animals to a variety of audiences ranging from veterinary students to humane societies.