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Appendix

Workshop Materials

AGENDA

October 28-29, 1999

The Lecture Room, Arnold and Mabel Beckman Center National Academies, 100 Academy Drive, Irvine, California

Thursday, October 28, 1999

8:30-8:45

Welcome

Carol Petrie, Director

Committee on Law and Justice, National Research Council

Nancy Crowell, Study Director

National Research Council

Joan Petersilia, Professor, Criminology, Law & Society

University of California, Irvine, and

Vice Chair, Committee on Law and Justice

8:45-9:00

Introduction—Objectives of Workshop

Joan Petersilia



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Page 81 Appendix Workshop Materials AGENDA October 28-29, 1999 The Lecture Room, Arnold and Mabel Beckman Center National Academies, 100 Academy Drive, Irvine, California Thursday, October 28, 1999 8:30-8:45 Welcome Carol Petrie, Director Committee on Law and Justice, National Research Council Nancy Crowell, Study Director National Research Council Joan Petersilia, Professor, Criminology, Law & Society University of California, Irvine, and Vice Chair, Committee on Law and Justice 8:45-9:00 Introduction—Objectives of Workshop Joan Petersilia

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Page 82 9:00-10:30 The Nature and Extent of Crimes Against Persons with Developmental Disabilities Ruth Luckasson, Professor of Special Education University of New Mexico Comments Beverly Frantz, Institute on Disabilities Temple University Jody Wildy, Director Center for Independent Living, Washington, DC Discussion 10:30-10:45 BREAK 10:45-12:15 Why Are Victims with Disabilities at High Risk for Victim ization: Conceptual and Theoretical Issues Richard Sobsey, Professor Department of Educational Psychology University of Alberta, Edmonton Peter Calder, Professor Emeritus Department of Educational Psychology University of Alberta, Edmonton Comments Ryan Wright, Deputy District Attorney Victims Service Unit Ventura County, CA District Attorney's Office Valeri Criino-Paez, Victim Advocate Ventura County, CA District Attorney's Office Discussion

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Page 83 12:15-12:45 Findings From the Survey of Women with Disabilities MaryAnn Curry, Professor, Oregon Health Services University School of Nursing Laurie Powers Center on Self Determination Oregon Institute on Disability and Development Discussion 12:45-2:00 Lunch Jan Chaiken, Director Bureau of Justice Statistics 2:00-3:30 Measuring the Incidence and Prevalence of Crime Against Persons with Disabilities: Methodological Concerns and Remedies Richard McCleary, Professor School of Social Ecology University of California, Irvine Douglas Wiebe School of Social Ecology University of California, Irvine Comments Colin Loftin, Professor School of Criminal Justice University of Albany Rick Ingraham, Chief, Health and Wellness Section Department of Development Services State of California Discussion

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Page 84 3:30-3:45 Break 3:45-5:15 Abuse and Neglect of Children with Disabilities Patricia M. Sullivan Center for Abused Children with Disabilities Boys Town National Research Hospital Comments John Knutson, Professor Department of Psychology University of Iowa Paul Feuerstein, Executive Director Barrier Free Living, Inc., New York, NY Discussion 5:15-5:30 Wrap-up Joan Petersilia 5:20 Adjourn 5:30 Reception Friday, October 29, 1999 8:30-8:45 Welcome 8:45-10:15 Mental Retardation and Court Processing: Consent, Capacity, and Other Key Legal Issues Robert D. Dinerstein, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs American University, Washington College of Law Comments

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Page 85   Gail Goodman, Professor Department of Psychology University of California, Davis Susan Stefan, Professor of Law University of Miami School of Law Discussion 10:15-10:30 BREAK 10:30-12:00 The Role of Law Enforcement in Providing Effective and ADA-Compliant Service to Victims with Developmental Disabilities Leigh Ann Davis The Arc of the United States, Arlington, Texas Comments Linda Teplin, Professor Department of Psychiatry School of Medicine Northwestern University Barry Perrou, Psychologist Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department Discussion 12:00-1:30 Lunch Laura Mosqueda, Director of Geriatrics and Clinical Associate Professor of Family Medicine UCI College of Medicine

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Page 86 1:30-3:00 Toward Victim Recovery: Meeting the Needs of Crime Victims with Disabilities Nora J. Baladerian Spectrum Institute Culver City, California Comments Dean Kilpatrick, Professor National Crime Victims Research and Treatment Center Medical University of South Carolina Lawrence H. Bergmann, President Post Trauma Resources Columbia, South Carolina Discussion 3:15 Break 3:30-5:00 Advocacy, Hate Crime Legislation, and Other Legal Means to Respond to Victims with Disabilities Ryken Grattet, Associate Professor Sociology Department University of California, Davis Valerie Jenness, Associate Professor Department of Criminology, Law & Society University of California, Irvine Comments Wayne Logan, Associate Professor School of Criminal Justice University of Albany

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Page 87   Marc Dubin, Trial Attorney Civil Rights Division Disability Rights Section U.S. Department of Justice Discussion 5:00 Wrap-up and adjourn

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Page 88 BACKGROUND PAPERS Crimes Against Persons with Developmental Disabilities: An Overview Ruth Luckasson Violence Against People with Disabilities: A Conceptual Analysis Richard Sobsey and Peter Calder Measuring the Victimization Risk of the Developmentally Disabled: Methodological Problems and Solutions Richard McCleary and Douglas Wiebe Violence and Abuse Against Children with Disabilities Patricia M. Sullivan Participation of People with Mental Retardation in Court Proceedings: Consent, Capacity, and Accommodation Robert D. Dinerstein The Criminal Justice Response to Victims with Developmental Disabili ties: Utilizing Effective ADA Accommodations Leigh Ann Davis Children and Adults with Developmental Disabilities: Maltreatment Update Nora J. Baladerian Policy Responses to the Victimization of Persons with Disabilities: An Assessment of the Viability of Using Hate Crime Law to Enhance the Status and Welfare of Persons with Disabilities Ryken Grattet and Valerie Jenness

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Page 89 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF PAPER AUTHORS Joan Petersilia (Workshop Chair) is professor of criminology, law, and society in the School of Social Ecology at the University of California, Irvine. She conducts research on various aspects of crime and public policy, focusing on both methodology and substance. Her research and teaching covers research methods, program evaluation, policy analysis, juvenile delinquency, corrections, and criminology. Nora Baladerian is a licensed clinical psychologist, licensed marriage and family therapist, certified sex therapist, board certified forensic examiner, and certified substance abuse professional. Since 1972, she has worked in the areas of child abuse and developmental disabilities and the abuse of dependent adults. She is the director of the Disability, Abuse and Personal Rights Project of SPECTRUM Institute in Los Angeles, California, and cochair of the Los Angeles County Child Abuse Council for Children with Disabilities, and the immediate past chair of the National Commission on Abuse of Adults with Disabilities (which has now merged with the National Committee to Prevent Elder Abuse). Peter Calder is a professor emeritus of educational psychology and clinical director of the J.P. Das Developmental Disabilities Centre at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada. Prior to becoming involved with the Centre and working on issues related to individuals with developmental disabilities, he taught and did research in the areas of counseling and school psychology. He has collaborated with Richard Sobsey in a number of stud ies relating to issues of individuals with developmental disabilities, includ ing a review commissioned by The Law Commission of Canada on the needs of victims of institutional abuse. Mary Ann Curry is the Grace Phelps distinguished professor at Oregon Health Sciences University School of Nursing. Her program of research focuses exclusively on issues of violence and abuse against women, including women with disabilities. Current projects include a nursing intervention for abused pregnant women, women's risk factors for being killed by an intimate partner, and the abuse experiences of women with disabilities. Leigh Ann Davis is project specialist of The Arc of the United States in

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Page 90 Silver Spring, Maryland. In 1994 she directed The Arc's Access to Justice Project and developed the only national resource list of its kind solely devoted to the issue of criminal justice and people with mental retardation. She authored Understanding Mental Retardation: Training for Law Enforcement, a training curriculum developed for The Arc's 1,000 state and local chapters to use when educating local police officers about mental retardation. She conducts train-the-trainer workshops throughout the country to facilitate continued education of police and people with disabilities. Robert Dinerstein is professor of law and associate dean for academic affairs at American University, Washington College of Law, where he has taught since 1983. Prior to coming to the Washington College of Law, he was an attorney for five years at the Department of Justice, Civil Rights Division, Special Litigation Section, where he litigated cases concerning conditions in state mental retardation, mental illness, and juvenile institutions. He is coeditor, with Stan Herr and Joan O'Sullivan, of A Guide to Consent (1999). Ryken Grattet is an assistant professor of sociology at the University of California, Davis. His research and teaching interests are in the fields of deviance, law, and public policy. He is completing a book (with Valerie Jenness) entitled, Bias Crime Politics and Public Policy: Building a Response to Discriminatory Violence, to be published in the American Sociological Association's Rose Monograph Series by the Russell Sage Foundation. Valerie Jennes is an associate professor in the Department of Criminology, Law and Society in the Department of Sociology at the University of California, Irvine. Her research focuses on the links between crime and social control (especially law), gender, and social change (especially social movements). She is the coauthor of Hate Crime Policy in the U.S.: Building a Response to Discriminatory Violence (with Ryken Grattet), and Hate Crimes: New Social Movements and the Politics of Violence (with Kendal Broad). Ruth Luckasson is Regents' professor and professor of special education at the University of New Mexico. She is the coordinator of mental retardation training programs, and teaches in the areas of legal rights of people with disabilities, special education law, teaching students with mental retardation, and educational leadership. As a lawyer, she also has a long history of working for the legal rights of people with mental retardation. Appointed

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Page 91 in 1988, Professor Luckasson chairs the American Association on Mental Retardation's Committee on Terminology and Classification, the major group charged with defining the disability of mental retardation. Richard McCleary is professor of social ecology and director of the MR/DD Research Center Biostatistics Core at the University of California, Irvine. During the 1998-99 academic year, he was visiting professor of public health (Epidemiology Division) at the University of Minnesota. His research interests include injury and injury-related fatalities, developmental disabilities of the very young and very old, and the relationship between the two. Laurie Powers is an associate professor of pediatrics, public health and psychiatry and the co-director of the Oregon Institute on Disability and Development's Center on Self-Determination at the Oregon Health Sciences University. She is the director of research for the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Health and Wellness for Persons with Long Term Disabilities. She has extensive experience in abuse and violence against persons with disabilities, health and wellness, and self-determination. Richard Sobsey is a professor of educational psychology and director of the J.P. Das Developmental Disabilities Centre at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada. He has worked with children and adults with severe and multiple disabilities since 1968 as a registered nurse, a certified teacher, and in a number of other roles and since 1986 has been actively involved in research on violence against people with disabilities and in advocating for reforms to reduce the risk of violence. He is author of Violence and Abuse in the Lives of People with Disabilities: The End of Silent Acceptance? and many other books and articles on the topic. His current research is on victims of homicide with developmental disabilities. Patricia Sullivan directs the Research Program on Abused Children with Disabilities at Boys Town National Research Hospital in Omaha, Nebraska. Her research areas of interest include: (1) the prevalence of maltreatment among children with disabilities; (2) efficacy studies of psychotherapy methods with sexually abused children; (3) factors coexisting with child abuse and neglect, such as domestic violence, parental alcohol and/or drug abuse, and family stress factors; (4) the general characteristics of runaways, including the presence of disabilities among them; (5) long-term psycho-

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Page 92 social consequences of maltreatment; and (6) identifying base rates and barriers to accessing managed care health services for children and youth with disabilities. Douglas Wiebe is a Ph.D. student in social ecology and a research associate in the MR/DD Research Center at the University of California, Irvine. His research focuses on public health and epidemiological approaches to reducing violence and injury. He has published research in the areas of statistical methodology, geographical and temporal patterns of street gang activity, violence among inmates, and the relationship between mental illness and violence.