Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff

GRAHAM KALTON (Chair) is a senior statistician and senior vice president of Westat. He is also a research professor in the Joint Program in Survey Methodology at the University of Maryland. Previously, he was a research scientist in the Survey Research Center and a professor of biostatistics and statistics at the University of Michigan, professor of social statistics at the University of Southampton, and reader in social statistics at the London School of Economics. His research interests are in survey sampling and general survey methodology. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He has served as president of the International Association of Survey Statisticians and president of the Washington Statistical Society. He is a past member of the Committee on National Statistics and has served as chair or a member of several of its panels. He received a B.Sc. degree in economics and an M.Sc. degree in statistics from the University of London and a Ph.D. degree in survey methodology from the University of Southampton.

DAVID M. BETSON is associate professor of economics at the University of Notre Dame. His previous positions have been as a visiting scholar at the Joint Center for Poverty Research of the University of Chicago and Northwestern University, a research associate at the Institute for Research on Poverty at the University of Wisconsin, and an economist in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation in the U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. His research examines the effects of governments on the distribution of economic well-being with special reference to the measurement of pov-



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Small-Area Estimates of School-Age Children in Poverty: Evaluation of Current Methodology Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff GRAHAM KALTON (Chair) is a senior statistician and senior vice president of Westat. He is also a research professor in the Joint Program in Survey Methodology at the University of Maryland. Previously, he was a research scientist in the Survey Research Center and a professor of biostatistics and statistics at the University of Michigan, professor of social statistics at the University of Southampton, and reader in social statistics at the London School of Economics. His research interests are in survey sampling and general survey methodology. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He has served as president of the International Association of Survey Statisticians and president of the Washington Statistical Society. He is a past member of the Committee on National Statistics and has served as chair or a member of several of its panels. He received a B.Sc. degree in economics and an M.Sc. degree in statistics from the University of London and a Ph.D. degree in survey methodology from the University of Southampton. DAVID M. BETSON is associate professor of economics at the University of Notre Dame. His previous positions have been as a visiting scholar at the Joint Center for Poverty Research of the University of Chicago and Northwestern University, a research associate at the Institute for Research on Poverty at the University of Wisconsin, and an economist in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation in the U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. His research examines the effects of governments on the distribution of economic well-being with special reference to the measurement of pov-

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Small-Area Estimates of School-Age Children in Poverty: Evaluation of Current Methodology erty and the analysis of child support policy. He received a Ph.D. degree in economics from the University of Wisconsin–Madison. CONSTANCE F. CITRO is a senior program officer for the Committee on National Statistics. She is a former vice president and deputy director of Mathematica Policy Research, Inc., and was an American Statistical Association/ National Science Foundation research fellow at the U.S. Census Bureau. For the committee, she has served as study director for numerous projects, including the Panel on Poverty and Family Assistance, the Panel to Evaluate the Survey of Income and Program Participation, the Panel to Evaluate Microsimulation Models for Social Welfare Programs, and the Panel on Decennial Census Methodology. Her research has focused on the quality and accessibility of large, complex microdata files, as well as analysis related to income and poverty measurement. She is a fellow of the American Statistical Association. She received a B.A. degree from the University of Rochester and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in political science from Yale University. MICHAEL L. COHEN is a senior program officer for the Committee on National Statistics, currently serving as the study director for the Panel on Research on Future Census Methods and assisting the Panel on Estimates of Poverty for Small Geographic Areas. He previously directed the Panel on Statistical Methods for Testing and Evaluating Defense Systems. Formerly, he was a mathematical statistician at the Energy Information Administration, an assistant professor in the School of Public Affairs at the University of Maryland, and a visiting lecturer at the Department of Statistics, Princeton University. His general area of research is the use of statistics in public policy, with particular interest in census undercount, model validation, and robust estimation. He received a B.S. degree in mathematics from the University of Michigan and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in statistics from Stanford University. NANCY E. DUNTON is director of the Center for Health and Social Research at the Midwest Research Institute. Formerly, she was a senior research scientist with the New York State Department of Social Services and the New York State Council on Children and Families. Her research focuses on social service policy issues, with a special emphasis on welfare reform and children's well-being. She received a Ph.D. degree in sociology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. WAYNE A. FULLER is distinguished professor in the Department of Statistics and Economics at Iowa State University. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association, the Econometric Society, and the Institute of Mathematical Statistics. He is the author of Introduction to Statistical Time Series and Measurement Error Models and has an active research program in survey sampling. He has held offices in national and international statistical organizations and has

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Small-Area Estimates of School-Age Children in Poverty: Evaluation of Current Methodology previously served on National Research Council panels. He received B.S. and M.S. degrees and a Ph.D. degree in statistical theory and methods from Iowa State University. THOMAS B. JABINE is a statistical consultant who specializes in the areas of sampling, survey research methods, and statistical policy. He was formerly a statistical policy expert for the Energy Information Administration, chief mathematical statistician for the Social Security Administration, and chief of the Statistical Research Division of the U.S. Census Bureau. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and a member of the International Statistical Institute. He has a B.S. degree in mathematics and an M.S. degree in economics and science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. SYLVIA T. JOHNSON is professor of research methodology and statistics in the School of Education at Howard University, where she is also editor-in-chief of the Journal of Negro Education. She is a principal investigator at the Center for Research on the Education of Students Placed at-Risk (CRESPAR), a joint activity of Howard University and Johns Hopkins University, and chair of the Design and Analysis Committee of the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). She has served on the faculties of Roosevelt, Trenton (NJ) State, and Western Illinois universities and Augustana and Chicago City Colleges; as a visiting scholar at the Educational Testing Service; as a member of the Technical Advisory Committee for the National Adult Literacy Survey and the Graduate Record Examination; and as a trustee of the College Board. She is a fellow of the American Psychological Association and chaired its Division 15 Committee on Members and Fellows and has served on the board of directors of the National Council on Measurement in Education. Her research interests include test fairness and use and the academic achievement of African American students. Dr. Johnson received a B.S. degree in mathematics from Howard University and a Ph.D. degree in educational measurement and statistics from the University of Iowa. THOMAS A. LOUIS is professor in the division of biostatistics at the University of Minnesota School of Public Health and professor of statistics in the School of Statistics. From 1987 to 1999 he was head of Biostatistics. In August 2000, he became a senior statistician at RAND. He is a member of the Committee on National Statistics, on the board of the Medical Follow-up Agency of the Institute of Medicine, and on the executive committee of the National Institute of Statistical Sciences. He is an elected member of the International Statistics Institute and a fellow of the American Statistical Association and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. His research interests focus on public health issues, including disease mapping and the health effects of airborne particulates, and on the development of statistical procedures, including Bayesian methods

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Small-Area Estimates of School-Age Children in Poverty: Evaluation of Current Methodology and the analysis of observational studies. He received a B.A. degree from Dartmouth College and a Ph.D. degree in mathematical statistics from Columbia University. SALLY C. MORTON is the Rand Chair in Statistics and head of the Statistics Group at RAND in Santa Monica, California. She is a lecturer in the School of Public Health at the University of California–Los Angeles. Previously, she taught at the RAND Graduate School of Public Policy Studies and the School of Business of the University of Southern California, was a visiting scholar at the Centre for Mathematical Analysis at Australian National University and the University of Southampton, and worked at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. She serves as an editor of Statistical Science and as an associate editor for the Journal of the American Statistical Association, is past chair of the association's Section on Statistical Graphics, and is a member of the Caucus for Women in Statistics and the Institute of Mathematical Statistics. Her health policy research concerns homelessness, severe mental illness, and outcomes research and quality of care in the areas of childbirth and AIDS. Her methodological research concentrates on meta-analysis, nonparametric regression, and the sampling of vulnerable populations. She received a Ph.D. degree in Statistics from Stanford University. JEFFREY S. PASSEL is a principal research associate at the Urban Institute. Previously, he was assistant division chief for estimates and projections in the Population Division of the U.S. Census Bureau, and he also directed the research on demographic methods for measuring census undercount. His research interests include the demography of immigration, particularly the measurement of illegal immigration; the effects and integration of immigrants into American society; and measuring and defining racial and ethnic groups in the United States. He is a member of a number of professional societies and has served in various capacities in the Population Association of America, the American Statistical Association, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He received a B.S. degree in mathematics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, an M. A. degree in sociology from the University of Texas at Austin, and a Ph.D. degree in social relations from the Johns Hopkins University. J.N.K. RAO is professor of statistics at Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada, and a consultant to Statistics Canada. Formerly, he was a professor at the University of Manitoba and Texas A&M University. His research interests include survey sampling theory and methods, particularly small-area estimation. He is a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, the American Statistical Association, and the Institute of Mathematical Statistics. He received a Ph.D. degree in statistics from Iowa State University.

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Small-Area Estimates of School-Age Children in Poverty: Evaluation of Current Methodology ALLEN L. SCHIRM is senior fellow at Mathematica Policy Research, Inc. Formerly, he was Andrew W. Mellon assistant research scientist and assistant professor at the University of Michigan. His principal research interests include small-area estimation and sample and evaluation design, with application to studies of child well-being and welfare, food and nutrition, and education policy. He is a member of the Committee on National Statistics Panel on Research on Future Census Methods and the American Statistical Association/Section on Survey Research Methods Working Group on the Technical Aspects of the Survey of Income and Program Participation. He received an A.B. degree in statistics from Princeton University and a Ph.D. degree in economics from the University of Pennsylvania. MICHELE VER PLOEG, a research associate for the panel, is also serving as study director for the Panel on Data and Methods for Measuring the Effects of Changes in Social Welfare Programs of the Committee on National Statistics. Her research interests include the effects of social policies on families and children, the outcomes of children who experience poverty and changes in family composition, and individuals ' education attainment choices. She received a B.A. degree in economics from Central College and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in consumer economics and housing from Cornell University. PAUL R. VOSS is professor of rural sociology at the University of Wisconsin– Madison and is affiliated with the Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty. For the past 21 years he has been affiliated with the Wisconsin Applied Population Laboratory and is currently its director. His research involves modeling small-area population change for purposes of population estimation and projection, and he also has studied and written about the demographic composition of small-area migration streams. He is a member of the U.S. Department of Commerce's Advisory Committee for the 2000 Census, as well as the Census Bureau's Advisory Committee of Professional Associations. He received a Ph.D. degree in sociology (demography) from the University of Michigan. JAMES H. WYCKOFF is acting dean in the Graduate School of Public Affairs at the University at Albany, State University of New York, and associate professor of public administration, public policy, and economics. His research focuses on the economics of education and state and local public economics. He was an American Statistical Association Fellow at the U.S. Census Bureau. He received a Ph.D. degree in economics from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. ALAN M. ZASLAVSKY is associate professor of statistics in the Department of Health Care Policy at Harvard Medical School. He was formerly on the faculty of the Department of Statistics at Harvard. His research interests include mea-

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Small-Area Estimates of School-Age Children in Poverty: Evaluation of Current Methodology surement of quality in health care, census methodology, estimation and correction of census undercount, small-area estimation, microsimulation, design and analysis of surveys, and Bayesian methods. He has served on two other panels of the Committee on National Statistics concerned with planning for the 2000 census. He received a Ph.D. degree in applied mathematics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. MEYER ZITTER, a consultant for the panel, is an independent demographic consultant. Formerly, he was chief of the U.S. Census Bureau's Population Division and also served as assistant director for international programs. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and a member of the International Statistical Institute and the International Union for the Scientific Study of Population. He has a B.B.A. degree from City College of New York.