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Appendix G

Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

James M. Davidson, Chair, recently retired as vice president for agriculture and natural resources at the University of Florida, a position he had held since 1992. From 1979 to 1992 Davidson served as assistant dean and dean for research for the University of Florida's Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS). He arrived at the UF/IFAS in 1972, as a visiting associate professor and joined the faculty as a soil science professor in 1974. Davidson previously taught at Oklahoma State University and held laboratory research positions at Oregon State University and at the University of California, Davis. A widely recognized expert in hydrology and agronomy, he has served on numerous committees investigating groundwater quality, including the Water Science and Technology Board (1986-1990). He earned a bachelors degree in soil science and a masters degree in soil physics from Oregon State University and a doctorate in soil physics from the University of California, Davis.

Scott W. Nixon, Vice Chair, is professor of oceanography and director of the Rhode Island Sea Grant College Program at the University of Rhode Island. He currently teaches both graduate and undergraduate classes in oceanography and ecology. His current research interests include coastal ecology, with emphasis on estuaries, lagoons, and wetlands. He has served on three National Research Council committees including, most recently, the Committee on Coastal Oceans. Dr. Nixon received a B.A. in biology from the University of Delaware and a Ph.D. in botany/ecology from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill.

John S. Adams is professor and chair of the Department of Geography at the University of Minnesota. He researches issues relating to North American cities, urban housing markets and housing policy, and regional economic development in the United States and the former Soviet Union. He has been a National Science Foundation Research Fellow at the Institute of Urban and Regional Development, University of California at Berkeley, and economic geographer in residence at the Bank of America World Headquarters in San Francisco. He was senior Fulbright Lecturer at the Institute for Raumordnung at the Economic University in Vienna and was on the geography faculty of Moscow State University. He has taught at Pennsylvania State University, the University of Washington, and the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. His most recent book, Minneapolis-St. Paul: People, Place, and Public Life, looks at the region's growth and at what factors may affect the metropolitan area's future. Adams holds two degree in economics and a doctorate in urban geography from the University of Minnesota.

Jean M. Bahr is professor the Department of Geology and Geophysics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison where she has been a faculty member since 1987. She served as chair of the Water Resources Management Program, UW Institute for Environmental Studies, from 1995-99 and she is also a member of the Geological Engineering Program faculty. Her current research focuses on the interactions between physical and chemical processes that control mass transport in ground water. She earned a B.A in geology from Yale University and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in applied earth sciences (hydrogeology) from Stanford University. She has served as a member of the National Research Council's Board on Radioactive Waste Management and several of its committees.



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Page 55 Appendix G Biographical Sketches of Committee Members James M. Davidson, Chair, recently retired as vice president for agriculture and natural resources at the University of Florida, a position he had held since 1992. From 1979 to 1992 Davidson served as assistant dean and dean for research for the University of Florida's Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS). He arrived at the UF/IFAS in 1972, as a visiting associate professor and joined the faculty as a soil science professor in 1974. Davidson previously taught at Oklahoma State University and held laboratory research positions at Oregon State University and at the University of California, Davis. A widely recognized expert in hydrology and agronomy, he has served on numerous committees investigating groundwater quality, including the Water Science and Technology Board (1986-1990). He earned a bachelors degree in soil science and a masters degree in soil physics from Oregon State University and a doctorate in soil physics from the University of California, Davis. Scott W. Nixon, Vice Chair, is professor of oceanography and director of the Rhode Island Sea Grant College Program at the University of Rhode Island. He currently teaches both graduate and undergraduate classes in oceanography and ecology. His current research interests include coastal ecology, with emphasis on estuaries, lagoons, and wetlands. He has served on three National Research Council committees including, most recently, the Committee on Coastal Oceans. Dr. Nixon received a B.A. in biology from the University of Delaware and a Ph.D. in botany/ecology from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. John S. Adams is professor and chair of the Department of Geography at the University of Minnesota. He researches issues relating to North American cities, urban housing markets and housing policy, and regional economic development in the United States and the former Soviet Union. He has been a National Science Foundation Research Fellow at the Institute of Urban and Regional Development, University of California at Berkeley, and economic geographer in residence at the Bank of America World Headquarters in San Francisco. He was senior Fulbright Lecturer at the Institute for Raumordnung at the Economic University in Vienna and was on the geography faculty of Moscow State University. He has taught at Pennsylvania State University, the University of Washington, and the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. His most recent book, Minneapolis-St. Paul: People, Place, and Public Life, looks at the region's growth and at what factors may affect the metropolitan area's future. Adams holds two degree in economics and a doctorate in urban geography from the University of Minnesota. Jean M. Bahr is professor the Department of Geology and Geophysics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison where she has been a faculty member since 1987. She served as chair of the Water Resources Management Program, UW Institute for Environmental Studies, from 1995-99 and she is also a member of the Geological Engineering Program faculty. Her current research focuses on the interactions between physical and chemical processes that control mass transport in ground water. She earned a B.A in geology from Yale University and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in applied earth sciences (hydrogeology) from Stanford University. She has served as a member of the National Research Council's Board on Radioactive Waste Management and several of its committees.

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Page 56 Linda K. Blum is research associate professor in the Department of Environmental Sciences at the University of Virginia. Her current research projects include study of mechanisms controlling bacterial community abundance, productivity, and structure in tidal marsh creeks; impacts of microbial processes on water quality; organic matter accretion in salt marsh sediments; and rhizosphere effects on organic matter decay in anaerobic sediments. Dr. Blum earned a B.S. and M.S. in forestry from Michigan Technological University and a Ph.D. in soil science from Cornell University. Patrick L. Brezonik is professor of environmental engineering and director of the Water Resources Research Center at the University of Minnesota. Prior to his appointment at the University of Minnesota in the mid-1980's, Dr. Brezonik was professor of water chemistry and environmental science at the University of Florida. His research interests focus on biogeochemical processes in aquatic systems, with special emphasis on the impacts of human activity on water quality and element cycles in lakes. He has served as a member of the National Research Council's Water Science and Technology Board and as a member of several of its committees. He earned a B.S. in chemistry from Marquette University and a M.S. and Ph.D. in water chemistry from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Frank W. Davis is a Professor at the University of California Santa Barbara (USCB) with appointments in the Donald Bren School of Environmental Science and Management and the Department of Geography. He received his B.A. in biology from Williams College and a Ph.D. from the Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering at The Johns Hopkins University. He joined the Department of Geography at UCSB in 1983, and established the UCSB Biogeography Laboratory in 1991. His research focuses on the ecology and management of California chaparral and oak woodlands, regional conservation planning, satellite remote sensing of regional land cover, and GIS modeling of species distributions. He was Deputy Director of the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis between 1995 and 1998, and currently directs the Sierra Nevada Network for Education and Research Page. Dr. Davis has been a member of two prior NRC committees and is currently serving on the NRC Committee on the Second Forum on Biodiversity. Wayne C. Huber is professor and head of the Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering at Oregon State University. Prior to moving to Oregon State in 1991, he served 23 years on the faculty of the Department of Environmental Engineering Sciences at the University of Florida where he engaged in several studies involving the hydrology and water quality of South Florida regions. His technical interests are principally in the areas of surface hydrology, stormwater management, nonpoint source pollution, and transport processes related to water quality. He is one of the original authors of the Environmental Protection Agency's Storm Water Management Model (SWMM) and continues to maintain the model for the EPA. Dr. Huber holds a B.S. in engineering from the California Institute of Technology and an M.S. and Ph.D. in civil engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is currently a member of the NRC's Committee on Causes and Management of Coastal Eutrophication. Stephen R. Humphrey is dean of the College of Natural Resources and Environment at the University of Florida where he also serves as affiliate professor of Latin American studies, wildlife ecology, and zoology. He also has been the curator in ecology for the Florida Museum of Natural History since 1980. Dr. Humphrey has authored and co-authored numerous articles and books on the effects of urbanization on wildlife. He holds B.A. in biology from Earlham College in Richmond, Indiana and a Ph.D. in zoology from Oklahoma State University. He is chair of the Environmental

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Page 57 Regulatory Commission of the Florida Department of Environmental Regulation and a member of the Florida Panther Technical Advisory Council of the Florida Game Commission. Daniel P. Loucks is professor of civil and environmental engineering at Cornell University. His research, teaching, and consulting interests are in the application of economics, engineering, and systems theory to problems involving environmental and water resources development and management. Dr. Loucks has held visiting appointments at a number of universities in the US and abroad, worked for the World Bank, the International Institute for Hydraulic and Environmental Engineering, the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis. He has been a consultant to a variety of government and international organizations on projects involving water resources development and management in Africa, Asia, Eastern and Western Europe and South America. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and most recently served on the National Research Council's Committee on Risk-Based Analyses for Flood Damage Reduction Studies. Gordon H. Orians (NAS) is professor emeritus of zoology at the University of Washington. Dr. Orians began teaching at the University of Washington in 1960 as an assistant professor of zoology and was director of the Institute for Environmental Studies 1976-1986. Dr. Orians has done pioneering research on the evolution of vertebrate social systems, both developing theory and testing a rich assortment of ideas. His research embodies studies on interspecific territoriality and optimal and central place foraging and integrates the concepts of environmental quality and habitat selection. Dr. Orians is a member of many professional societies and academies including the National Academy of Sciences. He has served on numerous National Research Council committees, including his current service as chair of the Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology. He holds a B.S. from the University of Wisconsin and a Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley in zoology. (Resigned from Committee as of Dec. 18, 2000) Kenneth W. Potter is professor of civil and environmental engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His expertise is in hydrology and water resources, including hydrologic modeling, estimation of hydrologic risk, estimation of hydrologic budgets, watershed monitoring and assessment, and aquatic ecosystem restoration. He received his B.S. in geology from Louisiana State University and his Ph.D. in geography and environmental engineering from The Johns Hopkins University. He has served as a member of the NRC's Water Science and Technology Board and several of its committees. Larry Robinson is director of the Environmental Sciences Institute at Florida A&M University where he is also a professor. At Florida A&M University he has led efforts to establish B.S. and Ph.D. programs in environmental science in 1998 and 1999, respectively. His research interests include environmental chemistry and the application of nuclear methods to detect trace elements in environmental matrices and environmental policy and management. Previously he was group leader of a neutron activation analysis laboratory at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). At ORNL he served on the National Laboratory Diversity Council and was President of the Oak Ridge Branch of the NAACP. Dr. Robinson earned a B.S. in chemistry, summa cum laude, from Memphis State University and a Ph.D. in nuclear chemistry from Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri. Steven E. Sanderson is Vice President for Arts and Sciences and Dean of Emory College at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia. In the mid-1980s, Dr. Sanderson served as Ford Foundation Program Officer for Rural Poverty and Resources in Brazil, where he designed and implemented the foundation's Amazon Program. He served on the faculty of the University of Florida from 1979 to 1997, chairing the Department of Political Science and directing the Tropical Conservation and Development Program. From 1994-97 he chaired the Social Science Research Council Committee

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Page 58 for Research on Global Environmental Change. He served on the National Research Council's Committee on Human Dimensions of Global Change from 1993-1996. Dr. Sanderson earned a B.A. in history from the University of Central Arkansas, and an M.A. in political science from the University of Arkansas. He earned a second M.A. and Ph.D. in political science from Stanford University. Rebecca R. Sharitz is professor of botany at the University of Georgia and senior scientist at the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory in Aiken, South Carolina. Currently, she researches ecological processes in wetlands, including factors affecting the structures and function of bottomlands hardwood and swamp forest ecosystems, responses of wetland communities to environmental disturbances, and effects of land management practices on nearby wetland systems. Dr. Sharitz has served on several NRC committees including, most recently, The Committee on Noneconomic and Economic Value of Biodiversity: Application for Ecosystem Management. She received a B.S. in biology from Roanoke College and a Ph.D. in botany and plant ecology from the University of North Carolina. John Vecchioli recently retired as a hydrologist with the U.S. Geological Survey's Water Resources Division in Tallahassee, Florida and as chief of the Florida District Program. Previously, he was responsible for quality assurance of all technical aspects of ground water programs in Florida. His research interests have included study of hydraulic and geochemical aspects of waste injection in Florida and of artificial recharge in Long Island, N.Y. He has also done research on ground watersurface water interactions in New Jersey and Florida. Mr. Vecchioli received his B.S. and M.S. in geology from Rutgers University. Mr. Vecchioli previously served on the NRC's Committee on Ground Water Recharge.