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APPENDIXES



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Page 115 APPENDIXES

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Page 117 Contributors DAVID BARAFF joined Pixar Animation Studios in 1998 as a senior animation scientist. Prior to his arrival at Pixar, he was an associate professor of robotics and computer science at Carnegie Mellon University. Dr. Baraff received his Ph.D. from Cornell University in 1992, where he was a graduate student in Cornell's Department of Computer Science and Program of Computer Graphics. Before and during his graduate studies, he also worked at Bell Laboratories' Computer Technology Research Laboratory doing computer graphics research, including real-time 3-D interactive animation and games. After receiving his Ph.D., he joined the faculty of Carnegie Mellon University. In 1995, Dr. Baraff was named an ONR Young Investigator. His research interests include physical simulation and modeling for computer graphics, robotics, and animation. ( deb@pixar.com) ERIC D. GREEN received his M.D. and Ph.D. from Washington University School of Medicine (St. Louis, Missouri) in 1987, studying the structure and biosynthesis of oligosaccharides on the pituitary glycoprotein hormones for his Ph.D. thesis work. During his residency training in clinical pathology, Dr. Green worked in the laboratory of Maynard Olson, where he developed approaches for utilizing yeast artificial chromosomes to construct physical maps of DNA. His work also included initiation of a project to construct a complete physical map of human chromosome 7 within the Washington University Genome Center—one of the first funded Centers in the Human Genome Project. In 1992, Dr. Green became an assistant professor of pathology, genetics, and medicine as well as a co-investigator in the Human Genome Center at Washington University. In 1994, he moved his research laboratory to the intramural program of the National Center for Human

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Page 118 Genome Research (recently renamed the National Human Genome Research Institute) at the National Institutes of Health, where he now serves as head of the Physical Mapping Section, chief of the Genome Technology Branch, and director of the NIH Intramural Sequencing Center. Dr. Green's research focuses on the mapping and sequencing of mammalian genomes and the isolation and characterization of genes causing genetic diseases. ( egreen@nhgri.nih.gov) HORST W. HAHN is vice chairman of the Department of Materials Science, professor of materials science, and head of the Thin Films Division at Darmstadt University of Technology, Germany. Previously, he was an associate professor of materials science with tenure at Rutgers University, a research assistant professor at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, and a research associate with the Materials Science Division at Argonne National Laboratory. Following the completion of his Ph.D., Dr. Hahn was the recipient of a fellowship from the Fritz-Thyssen Foundation and did a postdoc in the Department of Materials Science at the University of Saarland, Saarbrücken, Germany. Included in his professional activities are: associate editor for Materials Letters; past associate editor for Nanostructured Materials; member and chairman (since September 1999) of the Scientific Advisory Board of Hahn-Meitner Institute in Berlin; member of the Scientific Advisory Board of Sachs-Center at Technion, Haifa, Israel; and member of the International Committee for a series of nanotechnology conferences. Dr. Hahn is a member of the Materials Research Society, the German Materials Society, and the German Physical Society. He received his M.S. in materials science from the University of Saarland and his Ph.D. in metallurgy and materials science from the Technical University, Berlin. ( hhahn@tu-darmstadt.de) MARK D. JENKS is Boeing/MSFC International Space Station chief engineer. He is responsible for International Space Station engineering activities at Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, including design, development, and testing of the U.S. laboratory and joint U.S./Russian airlock elements; common hatches and berthing mechanisms; and payload racks. Prior to this assignment, Mr. Jenks was program manager for the ISS airlock element, and prior to that, managed the Integrated Product Development Teams responsible for the primary structure and external outfitting of the Station's first U.S. element, the Unity Node, launched in December 1998. Before coming to Huntsville in early 1996, Mr. Jenks managed Boeing's Helicopters Division Development Center in Philadelphia. He has also held positions in manufacturing technology, tool engineering, internal audit, project engineering, and aerodynamics research. A Boeing employee since 1983, Mr. Jenks was selected by Boeing for the MIT Leaders for Manufacturing Program in 1989 and received masters degrees in management and materials engineering. He also holds B.S. and M.S. degrees in aeronautical engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. ( mark.d.jenks@ boeing.com)

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Page 119 RONNY KOHAVI is the director of data mining at Blue Martini Software in San Mateo, Calif., where he leads the engineering group responsible for the data collection and analysis modules in the company's Customer Interaction System (CIS). Prior to joining Blue Martini, Dr. Kohavi managed the MineSet project, Silicon Graphics' award-winning product for data mining and visualization. He joined Silicon Graphics after getting a Ph.D. in machine learning from Stanford University, where he led the MLC++ project, the Machine Learning library in C++ now used in MineSet and for research at several universities. Dr. Kohavi received his B.A. from the Technion, Israel. He co-chaired KDD 99's industrial track with Jim Gray and the KDD Cup 2000 with Carla Brodley. He co-edited (with Foster Provost) the special issue of the journal Machine Learning on Applications of Machine Learning and the special issue of the journal Data Mining and Knowledge Discovery on Applications of Data Mining to Electronic Commerce (to appear in 2001). ( ronnyk@cs.stanford.edu) DOUGLAS A. LAUFFENBURGERis the co-director, Division of Bioengineering and Environmental Health, and director, Biotechnology Process Engineering Center, at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His area of work is molecular cell bioengineering—the application of engineering approaches to develop quantitative understanding of cell function in terms of molecular properties for improved design of cell-based technologies. Dr. Lauffenburger is the recipient of an NSF Presidential Young Investigator Award, NIH Career Development Award, the Allan P. Colburn Award from AIChE, a J.S. Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship, the Curtis W. McGraw Research Award from ASEE, and the Food Pharmaceutical & Bioengineering Division Award of the AIChE. He is a founding fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering, currently chair-elect of the College of Fellows, and has served as president of the Biomedical Engineering Society. Dr. Lauffenburger received his B.S. from the University of Illinois and Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota. ( lauffen@mit.edu) ROBERT W. LUCKY is corporate vice president for applied research at Telcordia Technologies, Inc. in Red Bank, New Jersey. Dr. Lucky attended Purdue University, where he received a B.S. degree in electrical engineering in 1957, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in 1959 and 1961. After graduation, he joined AT&T Bell Laboratories in Holmdel, New Jersey, where he was initially involved in studying ways of sending digital information over telephone lines. The best known outcome of this work was his invention of the adaptive equalizer— a technique for correcting distortion in telephone signals that is used in all high speed data transmission today. The textbook on data communications that he co-authored became the most cited reference in the communications field over the period of a decade. At Bell Labs he moved through a number of levels to become executive director of the Communications Sciences Research Division

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Page 120 in 1982, where he was responsible for research on the methods and technologies for future communication systems. In 1992 he left Bell Labs to assume his present position at Telcordia Technologies. Dr. Lucky has been active in professional activities and has served as president of the Communications Society of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and as vice president and executive vice president of the parent IEEE itself. He has been editor of several technical journals, including the Proceedings of the IEEE, and since 1982, he has written the bimonthly “Reflections” colunm of personalized observations about the engineering profession in Spectrum magazine. In 1993 these “Reflections” colunms were collected in the IEEE Press book Lucky Strikes . . . Again. Dr. Lucky is a fellow of the IEEE and a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He is also a consulting editor for a series of books on communications through Plenum Press. He has been on the advisory boards or committees of many universities and government organizations and was chairman of the Scientific Advisory Board of the United States Air Force from 1986-1989. He was the 1987 recipient of the prestigious Marconi Prize for his contributions to data communications, and he has been awarded honorary doctorates from four universities. He has also been awarded the Edison Medal of the IEEE and the Exceptional Civilian Contributions Medal of the U.S. Air Force. Dr. Lucky is a frequent speaker before both scientific and general audiences. He is the author of the popular book Silicon Dreams, which is a semi-technical and philosophical discussion of the ways in which both humans and computers deal with information. ( rlucky@telcordia.com) MARK W. MAIER is senior engineering specialist, Engineering and Technology Group, Reconnaissance Systems Division, The Aerospace Corporation. In his current position, Dr. Maier leads the systems architecture training program and is the director of an advanced concepts analysis group for part of the intelligence community. Formerly, Dr. Maier was an associate professor with tenure in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Alabama in Huntsville. From 1983–1992, he worked at Hughes Aircraft Company. Dr. Maier was the recipient of the Aerospace Institute Achievement Award in 1999 and 2000, and an International Council on Systems Engineering 1997 Professional of the Year award. He is a senior member of IEEE and active as a committee chair, working group member, and reviewer. Dr. Maier has a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of Southern California, and M.S. and B.S. degrees from the California Institute of Technology. ( Mark.W.Maier@aero.org) PILAR N. OSSORIO is assistant professor of law and medical ethics at the University of Wisconsin at Madison. Prior to taking her position at UW, she was director of the genetics section at the Institute for Ethics of the American Medical Association. Dr. Ossorio received her Ph.D. in microbiology and immunology in 1990 from Stanford University. She went on to complete a post-doctoral

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Page 121 fellowship in cell biology at Yale University School of Medicine. Throughout the early 1990s, Dr. Ossorio also worked as a consultant for the federal program on the Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications (ELSI) of the Human Genome Project, and in 1994 she took a full-time position with the Department of Energy's ELSI program. In 1993, she served on the Ethics Working Group for President Clinton's Health Care Reform Task Force. Dr. Ossorio received her J.D. from the University of California at Berkeley School of Law in 1997. She was elected to the legal honor society Order of the Coif and received several awards for outstanding legal scholarship. Dr. Ossorio is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), a past member of AAAS's Committee on Scientific Freedom and Responsibility, a member of the National Cancer Policy Board, and a member or chair of several working groups on genetics and ethics. She has published scholarly articles in bioethics, law, and molecular biology. ( pnossorio@facstaff.wisc.edu) LYNNE J. REGAN is a professor in the Department of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry and the Department of Chemistry at Yale University. After earning her B.A. from Oxford University, Dr. Regan received a Fulbright-Hayes Scholarship and attended the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, from which she received a Ph.D in biochemistry and molecular biology. She did postdocs at E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company and the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, England. She joined the Yale faculty in 1990. Dr. Regan is the recipient of an NSF Young Investigator Award, the Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award, the Biophysical Society's Margaret O. Dayhoff Award, and most recently, the Herbert W. Dickerman Award. ( lynne@nero.csb.yale.edu) PETER SCHRÖDER is an associate professor of computer science at the California Institute of Technology. Prior to Caltech, he was a postdoctoral research fellow and lecturer at the University of South Carolina. Dr. Schröder received his Ph.D. in computer science from Princeton University. Prior to Princeton, he was a member of the technical staff at Thinking Machines, where he worked on graphics algorithms for massively parallel computers. In 1990, he received an M.S. degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Media Lab. He did his undergraduate work at the Technical University of Berlin in computer science and pure mathematics. He has also held an appointment as a visiting researcher with the German national computer science research lab (GMD) and its visualization group. Dr. Schröder is a world expert in the area of wavelet-based methods for computer graphics. He helped pioneer the use of fast wavelet solvers for illumination computations and developed with Wim Sweldens the first practical spherical wavelet transform. Multiresolution techniques have been the subject of many invited lectures and courses he has given in Europe and North America for academic and industrial audiences. His publications record ranges from Wired magazine to Siggraph conferences and special scientific

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Page 122 journal issues on wavelets. In 1995 he was awarded an NSF Career Award and named a Sloan Fellow. More recently he was named a Packard Fellow. ( ps@cs.caltech.edu) MARVIN M. THEIMER is a senior researcher at Microsoft Research, exploring topics in peer-to-peer computing and Internet infrastructure. Dr. Theimer received his Ph.D. in computer science from Stanford University in 1986. He spent two years with the QuickSilver distributed operating system project at IBM's Almaden Research Center. Following that, he spent almost 10 years at Xerox's Palo Alto Research Center exploring the topics of ubiquitous computing and weakly consistent, replicated systems. Dr. Theimer joined the Systems & Networking group at Microsoft Research in late 1998. ( theimer@microsoft.com) RUDOLF M. TROMP is manager for analytic science at IBM's T.J. Watson Research Center and is currently on a 1-year assignment to the IBM Corporate Technology Council staff. After obtaining his Ph.D. in physics from the University of Utrecht, The Netherlands, Dr. Tromp joined the T.J. Watson Research Center in 1983. His scanning tunneling microscopy studies revealed the Si(001) dimer structure for the first time, as well as the spatial distribution of the Si(111)(7×7) electronic surface states, and their relation to the underlying atomic structure. Using medium energy ion scattering, he invented surfactant mediated epitaxial growth, a method which allows improved control over the morphology of epitaxial films and superlattices. More recently, his work has focused on the dynamics of surface and interface processes such as phase transitions, chemisorption and etching, epitaxial growth, and issues in nanotechnology. He has developed several in situ electron microscopy methods that allow detailed, real-time observations of such processes with high spatial resolution. These studies have shed new light on the thermodynamics of epitaxial growth, the dynamic evolution of the morphology of epitaxial films, the self-assembly of quantum dots, the spatio-temporal character of first- and second-order phase transitions at surfaces, and the growth of organic semiconductor films. Dr. Tromp is the recipient of the Wayne B. Nottingham Prize of the Physical Electronics Conference (1981), the Materials Research Society Medal (1995), and four IBM Outstanding Innovation and Technical Achievement Awards. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society and of the Boehmisce Physical Society. He is the holder of four U.S. patents. ( rtromp@us.ibm.com) OTTO Z. ZHOU is an associate professor of materials science and physics and the director of the North Carolina Center for Nanoscale Materials at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His research is focused on synthesis and solid state properties of nanoscale materials and their energy-storage, vacuum microelectronics, and nano-composite applications. He is the founding director of the North Carolina Center for Nanoscale Materials, which has 15 associated

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Page 123 faculty members from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina State University, and Duke University. Dr. Zhou has been active in the field of carbon fullerenes and nanotubes since their discovery. He has played an important role in synthesis and characterization of new fullerene-based super-conductors; one of the compounds he synthesized holds the current record high transition temperature among all C60 superconductors. His research on carbon nanotubes has demonstrated that these novel materials have promises in vacuum microelectronics, energy storage, and nanocomposites applications. His group has developed techniques for controlled fabrication and processing of nanotube materials; investigated their structure, mechanical and electronic properties; and fabricated nano-devices. He has published over 60 refereed journal articles (including 11 in Nature and Science) and 5 book chapters and holds 8 granted and pending U.S. patents on nanotechnology. He has given over 30 invited talks in national and international conferences, and has co-organized several symposia on nanomaterials and nanotechnology. Dr. Zhou received his doctorate in materials science from the University of Pennsylvania in 1992, and he was a post-doctoral member at the Bell Laboratories in Murray Hill, N.J. After spending a year at the NEC Research Laboratory in Japan, he joined UNC Chapel Hill as an assistant professor. ( zhou@physics.unc.edu)