Appendixes



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FUTURE ROLES AND OPPORTUNITIES FOR THE U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY Appendixes

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FUTURE ROLES AND OPPORTUNITIES FOR THE U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY This page in the original is blank.

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FUTURE ROLES AND OPPORTUNITIES FOR THE U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Donald J. DePaolo (Chair) is professor of geochemistry at the University of California, Berkeley, and a senior faculty scientist at the E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. His research interests include the chemical evolution of the Earth's mantle and continental crust, igneous and metamorphic petrology, and isotopic hydrology. He received the F.W. Clarke Medal of the Geochemical Society, the J.B. MacElwane Award of the American Geophysical Union, and the Mineralogical Society of America Award. His previous NRC service includes membership on the Committee Advisory to the U.S. Geological Survey, the Virtual Commission on Environmental Management Sciences, and the Board on Earth Sciences and Resources. Dr. DePaolo was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1993. Hugo F. Thomas (Vice Chair) is director of the Connecticut Institute of Water Resources and adjunct member of the Department of Natural Resource Management and Engineering, College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of Connecticut. He previously served as chief of environmental services in the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection and state geologist of Connecticut. His interests include the study and implementation of new techniques for integrating and using natural resources data in land and water decision making. Dr. Thomas established the Connecticut Geographic Information System Center to further data integration and use. In 1988, he was awarded the John Wesley Powell Award by the USGS, its most prestigious award for nonfederal scientists in enhancing the application of earth sciences to public needs. Dr. Thomas is a former member of the Water Science and Technology Board. John C. Antenucci is president of PlanGraphics, Inc. He is an engineer, planner, management consultant, and author specializing in technical and

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FUTURE ROLES AND OPPORTUNITIES FOR THE U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY institutional issues concerned with management of geographic information. He is the author of Geographic Information Systems: A Guide to the Technology, a leading book in the field of spatial information. Mr. Antenucci served as a member of the NRC's Mapping Science Committee from 1989 to 1992, during which time the committee prepared studies for the Defense Mapping Agency and the National Mapping Division of the U.S. Geological Survey. Odin D. Christensen is the chief geologist for Newmont Mining Corporation. He is responsible for technical oversight of Newmont's geological activities throughout the world. Dr. Christensen has been responsible for geologic exploration at Newmont's Carlin mine during unprecedented discovery and explosive growth along the Carlin Trend of Nevada. He served as the Thayer Lindsley Distinguished Lecturer of the Society of Economic Geologists. Prior to joining Newmont, he was an assistant professor at the University of North Dakota and later, a research geochemist at the University of Utah Research Institute. Michael T. Clegg is dean of the College of Natural and Agricultural Sciences and professor of genetics at the University of California, Riverside. He is chair of the NRC's Board on Biology and former chair of the Committee on Scientific Issues in the Endangered Species Act. His research interests are genetics, plant domestication, and plant molecular evolution. Dr. Clegg is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and was elected to the National Academy of Sciences. Thomas Dunne is a professor in the Donald Bren School of Environmental Science and Management and the Department of Geological Sciences at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He conducts field and theoretical studies of drainage-basin, hillslope, and fluvial geomorphology and of the application of hydrology and geomorphology in landscape management and hazard analysis. Dr. Dunne leads the Interdisciplinary Science Team, participating in NASA's Earth Observing System, that studies hydrology, sedimentation, biogeochemistry, and environmental change in the Amazon River Basin. He also conducts field research on erosion and sedimentation in the Pacific Northwest, central California, and New Mexico. He received the Robert E. Horton Award of the American Geophysical Union and the G.K. Warren Prize in Fluviatile Geology from the National Academy of

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FUTURE ROLES AND OPPORTUNITIES FOR THE U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY Sciences. His previous NRC committee service includes the Committee on Opportunities in the Hydrological Sciences, Committee on Alluvial Fan Flooding, and Committee on Water Resources Research of the USGS. Dr. Dunne was elected to the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. William Fisher holds the Barrow Centennial Chair in the Department of Geological Sciences at the University of Texas at Austin. He has extensive experience in academia and in state and federal government, including service as Texas State Geologist and director of the Bureau of Economic Geology, and as Assistant Secretary of the Interior. Dr. Fisher is past president of the Association of American State Geologists, American Association of Petroleum Geologists, American Geological Institute, American Institute of Professional Geologists, and Gulf Coast Association of Geological Societies. He has received the Powers Medal from AAPG, the Campbell Medal from AGI, the Parker Medal from AIPG, and the Hedberg Medal from ISEM. His research interests include energy and mineral policy, basin analysis, energy and mineral resource evaluation, stratigraphic facies analysis, seismic stratigraphic analysis, oil and gas recovery, environmental geology, and waste disposal. Dr. Fisher is a former member of the NRC's Commission on Geosciences, Environment, and Resources, former chair of the Board on Earth Sciences and Resources, and currently a member of the Board on Energy and Environmental Systems. Dr. Fisher was elected to the National Academy of Engineering. Lawrence W. Fritz is senior staff scientist at Lockheed Martin Corporation and is also president of the International Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing. His expertise includes mapping, geodesy, remote sensing and spatial information sciences. He served as director of the NOAA Charting Research and Development Laboratory and senior policy analyst for remote sensing, space and national security at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. He is on the Board of Directors of the Open GIS Consortium and served as chairman of the Review Board of the Photogrammetric Engineering & Remote Sensing Journal. He is an honorary cosmonaut of the Russian Academy of Cosmonautics, an honorary member of the American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing, a comendador of the Brazilian

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FUTURE ROLES AND OPPORTUNITIES FOR THE U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY Ordem do Mérito Cartográfico, he received the Colbert Medal of the Society of American Military Engineers and the Fairchild Award of ASPRS. Grant H. Heiken is staff member in the Earth and Environmental Science Division at Los Alamos National Laboratory. He was president of the International Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth's Interior (1995-1999). Dr. Heiken has conducted extensive research in volcanology, volcanic hazards, geothermal resources, and lunar geology. He is co-team leader of a Los Alamos initiative in “urban security,” which is an interdisciplinary, coupled approach to modeling cities, with integration of geological and atmospheric processes. His work on the interplay between natural hazards and society is demonstrated by a forthcoming book he coedited entitled Volcanic Hazards and Human Antiquity and by his role in organizing the First International Symposium on Volcanic Ash and Aviation Safety. He is a former member of the U.S. National Committee for the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics and former chairman of the U.S. National Committee of the International Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth's Interior. James A. MacMahon is a professor of biology and dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at Utah State University in Logan, Utah. His expertise is in ecology and vertebrate zoology. His research interests include the community ecology of deserts; biology of desert perennials; energy exchange in plant and animal populations; biology of reptiles and amphibians; and biology of arachnids. He serves on the editorial board of Ecological Restoration and as president of the Ecological Society of America. He is a member of the Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology. Dianne R. Nielson is executive director of the Utah Department of Environmental Quality, which safeguards and protects public health and quality of life by protecting and improving environmental quality. Prior to this appointment, Dr. Nielson worked as an exploration geologist and later directed the Utah Division of Oil, Gas, and Mining. She has worked closely with mining and oil and gas operators to minimize environmental impacts of resource development and to ensure viable postproduction land

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FUTURE ROLES AND OPPORTUNITIES FOR THE U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY use. She has chaired or worked on numerous state and federal commissions and advisory committees dealing with resource development and environmental issues. She is a member of the NRC Board on Earth Sciences and Resources and its Committee on Earth Resources, and is a past member of the Panel to Review the Mineral Resource Surveys Program Plan of the U.S. Geological Survey, as well as the Committee on Onshore Oil and Gas Leasing. Joanne M. Nigg is professor of sociology and co-director of the Disaster Research Center at the University of Delaware. She is also president of the Earthquake Engineering Research Institute. Dr. Nigg is an expert on the societal response to natural hazards and disasters. Specifically, her research has focused on the public understanding of disaster forecasts; public, organizational, and governmental responses to natural disasters; the factors that facilitate or inhibit the development of disaster preparedness and mitigation programs by local governments; and the evaluation of disaster education programs. She is a member of the Board on Natural Disasters and a past member of the Committee on Earthquake Engineering. Jerome O. Nriagu is professor of environmental chemistry of the Environmental Health Sciences Program, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. He has authored and edited 25 books related to his research interests in environmental chemistry, biogeochemistry, aquatic toxicology, and the health effects of toxic metals, especially lead, thallium, chromium, arsenic, and cadmium. He is the editor of the international journal Science of the Total Environment (published by Elsevier), and the book series, “Advances in Environmental Science and Technology ” (published by Wiley-Interscience). Dr. Nriagu is currently involved in a number of projects on environmental pollution and associated health effects in developing countries, served as chairman of the Dahlem Conference on Metal Cycles and Human Health, and was involved in organizing an International Conference on Medical Geology. He served on the NRC's Panel on Lead in the Human Environment. Raymond A. Price is professor emeritus of geological sciences and geological engineering at Queen's University, Kingston Ontario. Previously, he was director-general of the Geological Survey of Canada

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FUTURE ROLES AND OPPORTUNITIES FOR THE U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY and Assistant Deputy Minister of Energy Mines and Resources, Canada. A leading authority on tectonics and structural geology, Dr. Price has extensive expertise and experience in international geoscience organizations and multidisciplinary scientific problems, including global change and radioactive waste disposal. Dr. Price is a former president of the Geological Society of America and former president of the International Council of Scientific Unions Inter-Union Commission on the Lithosphere. He has served on several NRC committees, and is a former member of the Commission on Geosciences, Environment and Resources and Board on Earth Sciences and Resources' Panel to Review the U.S. Geological Survey's Energy Resources Program. He has received the Sir William Logan Medal of the Geological Association of Canada, the Leopold von Buch Medal of the Deutsche Geologische Gesellschaft, and the Major Edward D'Ewes Fitzgerald Coke Medal of the Geological Society of London, and he has been made an Officier de l'Ordre des Palmes Académiques, France. Dr. Price was elected to the National Academy of Sciences and the Royal Society of Canada. Daniel R. Sarewitz is managing director and, senior research scholar at Columbia University 's Center for Science, Policy, and Outcomes, where he works on a wide range of science and environmental policy issues. From 1995 to 1997, he was director of the Institute for Environmental Education of the Geological Society of America in Boulder, Colorado. For four years he was the science adviser to Chairman George E. Brown, Jr., with the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology of the U.S. House of Representatives. He is the author of the book Frontiers of Illusion: Science, Technology, and the Politics of Progress (1996), and the lead editor of Prediction: Science, Decision-Making, and the Future of Nature (2000). Bruce A. Stein is vice president for programs for the Association for Biodiversity Information, Arlington, Virginia. Dr. Stein is a specialist in the development and application of biodiversity information for conservation purposes. From 1987 to 2000 Dr. Stein was a Senior Scientist with The Nature Conservancy, where he was involved in establishing biodiversity inventory and protection programs. His current responsibilities include working with the Network of Natural Heritage Programs, a consortium of state biodiversity information centers, and

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FUTURE ROLES AND OPPORTUNITIES FOR THE U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY with a variety of U.S. federal agencies to encourage the use of biodiversity information in environmental management. Dr. Stein is a specialist in plant inventory, classification, and conservation, with particular expertise in the botany of tropical South America. He is a research collaborator at the National Museum of Natural History and serves on the steering committee of the Species Survival Commission of the World Conservation Union. His recent publications include the book: Precious Heritage: The Status of Biodiversity in the United States. Dr. Stein holds a B.A. in biology and environmental studies from the University of California, Santa Cruz, and received his Ph.D. from Washington University, St. Louis, in a joint program with the Missouri Botanical Garden. Anthony R. de Souza (NRC) is currently director of the Board on Earth Sciences and Resources at the National Research Council in Washington, D.C. Previously, he was executive director of the National Geography Standards Project, secretary general of the 27th International Geographical Union Congress, editor of National Geographic Research & Exploration, and editor of the Journal of Geography. He has held positions as a professor and as a visiting teacher and scholar at the George Washington University, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, University of Minnesota, University of California-Berkeley, and University of Dar es Salaam in Tanzania. He has served as a member of NRC committees. He holds B.A. (honors) and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Reading in England, and has received numerous honors and awards, including the Medalla al Benito Juarez in 1992 and the Gilbert Grosvenor honors award from the Association of American Geographers in 1996. His research interests include the processes and mechanisms of economic development and human-environment relationships. He has published several books and more than 100 articles, reports, and reviews. Tamara L. Dickinson (NRC) is a senior program officer for the Board on Earth Sciences and Resources of the National Research Council. She has served as program director for the Petrology and Geochemistry Program in the Division of Earth Sciences at the National Science Foundation. She has also served as discipline scientist for the Planetary Materials and Geochemistry Program at NASA Headquarters. As a postdoctoral fellow at the NASA Johnson Space Center, she conducted

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FUTURE ROLES AND OPPORTUNITIES FOR THE U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY experiments on the origin and evolution of lunar rocks and highly reduced igneous meteorites. She holds a Ph.D. and a M.S. in geology from the University of New Mexico and a B.A. in geology from the University of Northern Iowa. Rebecca E. Shapack (NRC) is a research assistant for the Board on Earth Sciences and Resources of the National Research Council. She holds a B.S. in mathematical sciences engineering with a concentration in biology from the Johns Hopkins University, and is currently working on her M.S. in public health at the George Washington University.