6

Follow-up for the Assessment Tool

Given the significant investment being made in this innovative toolit would be a shame to use it only in the next round of comprehensiveplan amendments. However, any future use of the CCAM, including theadditional applications described above, will be possible only ifthe CCAM is maintained. Although the study team indicated that discussionsabout the CCAM's future have been initiated, and the scope of workrefers to development of a fiscal and administrative framework forthis purpose, this issue should be given substantially more attention,now, during the design phase. Suitable provisions should be madein each module to ensure that future updates, revisions, or enhancementsare possible. Changes will certainly occur in the development patternsand overall economy of the Keys. Changes may also occur in nature(such as sea-level change), in local culture, or in our fundamentalunderstanding of human and ecological systems.

The ultimate creation of a continuing implementation mechanism willdepend on future decisions by the Florida Department of CommunityAffairs, the Army Corps of Engineers, and Monroe county and is clearlybeyond the scope of the current contract. Nevertheless, one relativelysimple task under this contract should be to provide a blueprintfor such implementation while the contractor and subcontractors arestill familiar with the inner workings of the CCAM. The blueprintshould include at least the following elements:

  1. Suggestions for plausible organizational mechanisms for maintainingand updating the assessment tool (for example, within a state orcounty government agency or a university);

  2. A description of the number and kinds of staff required;

  3. An estimate of the initial and subsequent annual budgets required,along with any special logistical and equipment needs.

Based on considerable experience with comparable large projects,the committee recommends that design of a detailed implementationprogram be one output of the present effort.



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 21
Interim Review of the Florida Keys Carrying Capacity Study 6 Follow-up for the Assessment Tool Given the significant investment being made in this innovative toolit would be a shame to use it only in the next round of comprehensiveplan amendments. However, any future use of the CCAM, including theadditional applications described above, will be possible only ifthe CCAM is maintained. Although the study team indicated that discussionsabout the CCAM's future have been initiated, and the scope of workrefers to development of a fiscal and administrative framework forthis purpose, this issue should be given substantially more attention,now, during the design phase. Suitable provisions should be madein each module to ensure that future updates, revisions, or enhancementsare possible. Changes will certainly occur in the development patternsand overall economy of the Keys. Changes may also occur in nature(such as sea-level change), in local culture, or in our fundamentalunderstanding of human and ecological systems. The ultimate creation of a continuing implementation mechanism willdepend on future decisions by the Florida Department of CommunityAffairs, the Army Corps of Engineers, and Monroe county and is clearlybeyond the scope of the current contract. Nevertheless, one relativelysimple task under this contract should be to provide a blueprintfor such implementation while the contractor and subcontractors arestill familiar with the inner workings of the CCAM. The blueprintshould include at least the following elements: Suggestions for plausible organizational mechanisms for maintainingand updating the assessment tool (for example, within a state orcounty government agency or a university); A description of the number and kinds of staff required; An estimate of the initial and subsequent annual budgets required,along with any special logistical and equipment needs. Based on considerable experience with comparable large projects,the committee recommends that design of a detailed implementationprogram be one output of the present effort.