APPENDIX A

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS

MILTON LEVENSON(Chair) is a chemical engineer with over 48 years of experience in nuclear energy and related fields. His technical experience includes work in nuclear safety, fuel cycle, water reactor technology, advanced reactor technology, remote control technology, and sodium reactor technology. His professional experience includes positions at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (research and operations), Argonne National Laboratory, the Electric Power Research Institute (first director of nuclear power), and Bechtel (last position was vice-president of Bechtel International). Mr. Levenson is the past president of the American Nuclear Society and a fellow of the American Nuclear Society and the American Institute of Chemical Engineers. He is the author of over 150 publications and holds three U.S. patents. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1976. Mr. Levenson has served on many National Research Council committees, and in 1998 served as principal investigator for the Board on Radioactive Waste Management project on aluminum spent fuel.

GREGORY R. CHOPPIN(Vice-Chair) is the R.O. Lawton Distinguished Professor of Chemistry at Florida State University. His research interests include nuclear chemistry, physical chemistry of actinides and lanthanides, environmental behavior of actinides, chemistry of the f-elements, separation science of the f-elements, and concentrated electrolyte solutions. While at Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, he participated in the discovery of mendelevium, element 101. Dr. Choppin's research interests have been recognized by the American Chemical Society with its Award in Nuclear Chemistry and the Southern Chemist Award, the Manufacturing Chemists Award in Chemical Education, and a with a Presidential Citation Award by the American Nuclear Society. He has served on numerous NRC committees, is currently a member of the Board on Radioactive Waste Management, and recently completed a 6-year term as a member of the Board on Chemical Sciences and Technology.

JOHN E. BERCAW is the Centennial Professor of Chemistry at the California Institute of Technology. Dr. Bercaw is an expert in organometallic chemistry. His research interests include synthetic, structural, and mechanistic organotransition metal chemistry, compounds of early transition metals, and hydrolyzation of alkanes by simple platinum halides in aqueous solutions. Dr. Bercaw is a former chair and executive committee member of the American Chemical Society's Inorganic Chemistry Division. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. His work has been recognized by the American Chemical Society with its Award in Pure Chemistry, the George A. Olah Award in Hydrocarbon or Petroleum Chemistry, and the Award for Distinguished Service in the Advancement of Inorganic Chemistry. Dr. Bercaw was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1990.

DARYLE H. BUSCH is the Roy A. Roberts Distinguished Professor of chemistry at the University of Kansas. His research, which fathered synthetic macrocyclic ligand chemistry and created the molecular template effect, is presently focused on homogeneous catalysis, bioinorganic chemistry, and orderly molecular entanglements. He is a recipient of the American



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EVALUATION OF CRITERIA FOR SELECTING A SALT PROCESSING ALTERNATIVE FOR HIGH-LEVEL WASTE AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE: INTERIM REPORT APPENDIX A BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS MILTON LEVENSON(Chair) is a chemical engineer with over 48 years of experience in nuclear energy and related fields. His technical experience includes work in nuclear safety, fuel cycle, water reactor technology, advanced reactor technology, remote control technology, and sodium reactor technology. His professional experience includes positions at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (research and operations), Argonne National Laboratory, the Electric Power Research Institute (first director of nuclear power), and Bechtel (last position was vice-president of Bechtel International). Mr. Levenson is the past president of the American Nuclear Society and a fellow of the American Nuclear Society and the American Institute of Chemical Engineers. He is the author of over 150 publications and holds three U.S. patents. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1976. Mr. Levenson has served on many National Research Council committees, and in 1998 served as principal investigator for the Board on Radioactive Waste Management project on aluminum spent fuel. GREGORY R. CHOPPIN(Vice-Chair) is the R.O. Lawton Distinguished Professor of Chemistry at Florida State University. His research interests include nuclear chemistry, physical chemistry of actinides and lanthanides, environmental behavior of actinides, chemistry of the f-elements, separation science of the f-elements, and concentrated electrolyte solutions. While at Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, he participated in the discovery of mendelevium, element 101. Dr. Choppin's research interests have been recognized by the American Chemical Society with its Award in Nuclear Chemistry and the Southern Chemist Award, the Manufacturing Chemists Award in Chemical Education, and a with a Presidential Citation Award by the American Nuclear Society. He has served on numerous NRC committees, is currently a member of the Board on Radioactive Waste Management, and recently completed a 6-year term as a member of the Board on Chemical Sciences and Technology. JOHN E. BERCAW is the Centennial Professor of Chemistry at the California Institute of Technology. Dr. Bercaw is an expert in organometallic chemistry. His research interests include synthetic, structural, and mechanistic organotransition metal chemistry, compounds of early transition metals, and hydrolyzation of alkanes by simple platinum halides in aqueous solutions. Dr. Bercaw is a former chair and executive committee member of the American Chemical Society's Inorganic Chemistry Division. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. His work has been recognized by the American Chemical Society with its Award in Pure Chemistry, the George A. Olah Award in Hydrocarbon or Petroleum Chemistry, and the Award for Distinguished Service in the Advancement of Inorganic Chemistry. Dr. Bercaw was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1990. DARYLE H. BUSCH is the Roy A. Roberts Distinguished Professor of chemistry at the University of Kansas. His research, which fathered synthetic macrocyclic ligand chemistry and created the molecular template effect, is presently focused on homogeneous catalysis, bioinorganic chemistry, and orderly molecular entanglements. He is a recipient of the American

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EVALUATION OF CRITERIA FOR SELECTING A SALT PROCESSING ALTERNATIVE FOR HIGH-LEVEL WASTE AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE: INTERIM REPORT Chemical Society's Award for Distinguished Service in Inorganic Chemistry and its Award for Research in Inorganic Chemistry. Recently Dr. Busch received the International Izatt-Christensen Award for Research in Macrocyclic Chemistry and the University of Kansas's Louis Byrd Graduate Educator Award. Dr. Busch was elected president of the American Chemical Society in 2000. JAMES H. ESPENSON is Distinguished Professor of Chemistry at Iowa State University and program director of molecular processes at DOE's Ames Laboratory. He has received the John A. Wilkinson award for excellence in teaching, an award from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, and is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He has served as a member of the executive committee and as a councilor for the American Chemical Society's Division of Inorganic Chemistry. Espenson studies transition metal complexes as catalysts for chemical reactions (including oxidation-reduction reactions), as participants in atom-transfer mechanisms, as reagents in new reactions, and as templates for coordination phenomena. His research has focused on oxo- and thio-complexes of rhenium in high oxidation states. GEORGE E. KELLER II, since retiring as a senior corporate research fellow from the Union Carbide Corporation in 1997, has been active in economic-development enterprises and consulting. He is also an adjunct professor of chemical engineering at two universities. His technical expertise lies in separation processes, reaction engineering and catalysis, energy use minimization, and new process configurations. Dr. Keller has 35 publications and 21 co-held patents, and has given invited lectures in many universities, technical meetings, and companies around the world. He is the recipient of four national awards for technical excellence: three from the American Institute of Chemical Engineers and the Chemical Pioneer Award from the American Institute of Chemists. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1988 and presently serves as a member of the Board on Chemical Sciences and Technology of the National Research Council. THEODORE A. KOCH is currently a DuPont fellow (the highest professional title in the company); he is also an adjunct professor of chemical engineering at the University of Delaware. He has spent his entire career developing chemical processes and bringing them from the benchtop to commercial reality. He holds 29 patents and has authored 9 journal articles and 1 book. He is a member of the Catalysis Club of Philadelphia (former program chair and president), the North American Catalysis Society, and the American Institute of Chemical Engineers. Dr. Koch received the Award for Excellence in Catalytic Science and Technology from the Catalysis Club of Philadelphia and the Lavoisier Award for Technical Excellence from the E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company. ALFRED P. SATTELBERGER is the director of the Chemistry Division at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Dr. Sattelberger's research interests include actinide science, technetium coordination and organometallic chemistry, and metal-metal multiple bonding. Prior to his current position Dr. Sattelberger held a professorship at the University of Michigan. He is a past member of the executive committee of the Inorganic Chemistry Division of the American Chemical Society, and serves on the board of directors for the Inorganic Synthesis Corporation and the Los Alamos National Laboratory Foundation. He served as a reviewer on the FY 1996 general inorganic chemistry Environmental Management Science Program merit review panel

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EVALUATION OF CRITERIA FOR SELECTING A SALT PROCESSING ALTERNATIVE FOR HIGH-LEVEL WASTE AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE: INTERIM REPORT and on the National Research Council's Committee on Building an Effective EM Science Program. MARTIN J. STEINDLER'S last position was as director of the Chemical Technology Division at Argonne National Laboratory. His expertise is in the fields of nuclear fuel cycle and associated chemistry, engineering, and safety, with emphasis on fission products and actinides. He also has experience in the structure and management of research, development, and deployment organizations and activities. Dr. Steindler has been a consultant to the Atomic Energy Commission, the Energy Research and Development Agency, and various Department of Energy laboratories. He chaired both the Materials Review Board for the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Advisory Committee on Nuclear Waste. Dr. Steindler has served on several National Research Council committees, and currently serves on the Board on Radioactive Waste Management.