TABLE 5–7 Passing Rates for the CBEST by Population Group, 1995– 1996 Cohort

 

First-Time Passing Rates

Eventual Passing Rates

Ethnicity

Na

% Passing

N

% Passing

African American

2,599

41

2,772

73

Asian American

1,755

66

1,866

87

Mexican American

3,907

51

4,344

88

Latino or other Hispanic

2,014

47

2,296

81

White

25,928

79

26,703

94

aThe size of the 1995–1996 cohort differs for the first-time and eventual reports because first-time rates consider candidates who took all three CBEST sections on their first attempt; eventual rates consider candidates who took each CBEST section at least once by 1998/1999.

SOURCE: Data from Carlson et al., (2000).

between Mexican Americans and whites dropped from 28 to 6 points, and the gap between Latino/other Hispanic examinees and white candidates dropped from 22 to 13 percentage points.

From these data, eventual passing rates tell a different story than do initial rates. The committee contends that both sets of data need to be included in policy makers’ judgments about the disparate impact of tests for licensing minority and majority group teacher candidates.

For the MSAT, initial and eventual passing rates for all groups were lower than CBEST passing rates. In addition, passing rates for minority candidates were lower than majority passing rates on the MSAT. The difference between African American and white candidates on the first MSAT was 49 percentage points. By the end of the 1998/1999 testing year, the difference dropped to 42 percent. A 35 percentage point difference between Mexican American and white candidates on the first attempt dropped to 26 percentage points by the end of the third year. The difference for Latino/other Hispanic and white candidates dropped from 33 to 22 percentage points.

Tables 5–11, 5–12, 5–13, and 5–14 provide similar data for Connecticut teacher candidates. The structure of the Connecticut data set differs from that of the California data in that, passing rates are shown for all Connecticut candidates who tested between 1994 and 2000. For the California analyses, the records of first-time candidates in a given year were matched to any subsequent testing attempts made in the next several years. The Connecticut analyses begin with initial testers in 1994, and the data set follows these individuals over the next six years. The data set also includes initial testers from 1995; the records of these candidates are matched to any retest attempts occurring in the next five years.



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