Index

A

Ability-based teacher education at Alverno College, 322–330

abilities and learning outcomes for the baccalaureate degree, 322–324

abilities and learning outcomes in teacher education , 324

Alverno’s program for education majors, 324–326

assessment as learning, 326–327

research and program evaluation, 327–330

Accountability

and evaluation, 196–198

of higher education institutions for quality of teacher preparation, 8–9, 170–171

for holding states and higher education institutions, 138–145

improving with teacher licensure tests, 136– 146

for programs that prepare teachers, 198–201

Accreditation of teacher education programs, 42–43

ACT, 132

Administration of teacher licensure tests, 77–78

Administrative provisions, under Public Law 105–244, 194–196

Admission requirements, for teacher education, state-specified, 43

Alaska’s initial teacher licensure system, 57–58, 269–272

post baccalaureate teacher preparation at the University of Alaska, 271–272

redesign of teacher education, 270–272

teacher education at Alaska’s private schools, 272

Alternative assessment strategies

ability-based teacher education at Alverno College, 322–330

analysis of, 158–162

case studies, 298–330

Connecticut’s teacher preparation and induction program, 308–315

Ohio’s teacher induction program, 315–321

performance assessment of experienced teachers by the NBPTS, 298–308

Alternative preparation programs for teachers, 44

in Maryland’s licensure system, 285–286

Alverno College, 149, 156–158

ability-based teacher education at, 322–330

assessment as learning, 326–327

outcomes for the baccalaureate degree, 322– 324

outcomes in teacher education, 324

program for education majors, 324–326

research and program evaluation, 327–330

Angoff. See Modified Angoff method



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 335
Testing Teacher Candidates: The Role of Licensure Tests in Improving Teacher Quality Index A Ability-based teacher education at Alverno College, 322–330 abilities and learning outcomes for the baccalaureate degree, 322–324 abilities and learning outcomes in teacher education , 324 Alverno’s program for education majors, 324–326 assessment as learning, 326–327 research and program evaluation, 327–330 Accountability and evaluation, 196–198 of higher education institutions for quality of teacher preparation, 8–9, 170–171 for holding states and higher education institutions, 138–145 improving with teacher licensure tests, 136– 146 for programs that prepare teachers, 198–201 Accreditation of teacher education programs, 42–43 ACT, 132 Administration of teacher licensure tests, 77–78 Administrative provisions, under Public Law 105–244, 194–196 Admission requirements, for teacher education, state-specified, 43 Alaska’s initial teacher licensure system, 57–58, 269–272 post baccalaureate teacher preparation at the University of Alaska, 271–272 redesign of teacher education, 270–272 teacher education at Alaska’s private schools, 272 Alternative assessment strategies ability-based teacher education at Alverno College, 322–330 analysis of, 158–162 case studies, 298–330 Connecticut’s teacher preparation and induction program, 308–315 Ohio’s teacher induction program, 315–321 performance assessment of experienced teachers by the NBPTS, 298–308 Alternative preparation programs for teachers, 44 in Maryland’s licensure system, 285–286 Alverno College, 149, 156–158 ability-based teacher education at, 322–330 assessment as learning, 326–327 outcomes for the baccalaureate degree, 322– 324 outcomes in teacher education, 324 program for education majors, 324–326 research and program evaluation, 327–330 Angoff. See Modified Angoff method

OCR for page 335
Testing Teacher Candidates: The Role of Licensure Tests in Improving Teacher Quality Appropriations, authorization of, under Public Law 105–244, 203 Approval, of teacher education programs, 42–43 Arizona’s teacher licensure system, NES teacher licensure tests in, 248–249 Assessment. See also Classroom performance assessment centers for, in EA/ELA, 305 as learning, at Alverno College, 326–327 purpose of, 75–76 teachers as using formal and informal strategies, according to INTASC, 212– 213 Assessment of Teaching Skills-Written, 52 Assessors, training in the PATHWISE Induction Program-Praxis III Version, 320–321 Authoritarian personality, 21 Authorization of appropriations, under Public Law 105–244, 203 Average scores, and the differences between minority and majority teacher candidates on teacher licensing tests, 101–102 B Baccalaureate degree programs, at Alverno College, abilities and learning outcomes for, 322–324 Basic skills currently used licensure tests of, 51 list of Praxis tests on, 221–222 research on testing, 131–132 Beginning Educator Support and Training (BEST) program in Connecticut, 153, 310, 312–313 portfolio assessments, 312–313 support for mentors, 313 Beginning teacher competence defining, 2–3, 164 measuring appropriately, 2–8, 164–170 Beginning teachers designing licensure tests for measuring, 3–4, 165–166 evaluating licensure tests for, 6–8, 167–170 licensure tests for, 32, 34–69, 288–293 making decisions about candidates based on licensure tests, 4–5, 56, 166–167 support programs for, 46–47 BEST. See Beginning Educator Support and Training program Bias, factors contributing to, 110–111 Biology: Content Knowledge Tests, Parts 1 and 2, evaluating, 84, 95–97, 101 Board on Testing and Assessment, 2, 15–16 Bookmarking method, of standard setting for teacher licensure tests, 65 Brown v. Board of Education decision, 22 Bureau of Labor Statistics, National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth-Child Data, 135 Buros Center for Testing, 16, 83–84 Bush, George W., 11 C California Basic Educational Skills Test (CBEST), 57, 105–107 California’s teacher licensure system, 276–282 direct internship programs, 280–282 initial licensure requirements in, 57, 59, 62 NES teacher licensure tests in, 249–250 preinternship program, 281–282 Title II state grant, 282 traditional teacher preparation programs, 277–279 university internship programs, 279–280 Candidate performance, NCATE standards, 216–217 CBEST. See California Basic Educational Skills Test Census Bureau, 134 Cincinnati, introduction and peer review, 155– 156 Civil Rights Act of 1964, 112 Classroom interactions, teachers as fostering supportive, according to INTASC, 210– 211 Classroom performance assessment, in the PATHWISE Induction Program-Praxis III inversion, 318–319 Clinton, William, 11–12 Colorado’s teacher licensure system, NES teacher licensure tests in, 250–251 Committed to students and their learning, teachers as, 23–26 according to NBPTS, 26, 215, 218, 300 according to NCATE, 26 Committee on Assessment and Teacher Quality, 2, 15–16

OCR for page 335
Testing Teacher Candidates: The Role of Licensure Tests in Improving Teacher Quality Common Core of Teaching, components of Connecticut’s, 153, 311 Comparisons of teacher licensure tests comparability issues, 79 data combined across states, 98 with different test scales, 98 first-time and eventual passing rates, 97–98 methodological issues, 97–98 Competencies to be assessed by teacher licensure tests, 76 focusing teacher education on identified, 136–138 Competent beginning teaching defining, 2–3, 164 measuring appropriately, 2–8, 164–170 Competent teachers equilibrium teacher wage and the number of, 294–297 in presenting the prescribed curricula, 22 Connecticut’s teacher licensure system Beginning Educator Support and Training program, 153, 310, 312–313 Beginning Teacher Induction Program, 153– 154 Common Core of Teaching, 153, 311 initial licensure requirements in, 57, 60–61 preservice training, 310 professional development, 313–314 role of other staff, 314 studies of technical characteristics, 314–315 support for teachers seeking NBPTS certification, 309 teacher preparation and induction program in, 308–315 Consequences of disparities in test performances, 111–112 Consistency and reliability of teacher licensure tests, 79 Contrasting groups method, of standard setting for teacher licensure tests, 65 Core Battery tests Communication Skills Test, 51–52 General Knowledge Test, 51 Professional Knowledge Test, 51–53 Corruptibility, protection of teacher licensure tests from, 78 Costs, of teacher licensure tests, 81 Council for Higher Education Accreditation, 43 Council of Chief State School Officers, 48 Course requirements, in teacher education, state-specified, 43–44 Creators of learning experiences, teachers as, according to INTASC, 205 Criteria, for evaluating teacher licensure tests, 70–71 Cultural values, teachers as transmitters of, 21 Currently used licensure tests, 47–55 basic skills, 51 concerns about, 54–55 general knowledge, 51 measuring beginning teacher competence appropriately, 2–8, 164–170 pedagogical knowledge, 52–53 standards for passing scores, 66–68 subject matter knowledge, 51–52 subject-specific pedagogical knowledge, 53–54 types of tests used by states, 48–54 D Decisions about candidates, basing on licensure tests for beginning teachers, 4–5, 56, 166–167 Demand for teachers, 293–294 Designing licensure tests, for measuring beginning teacher competence, 3–4, 165–166 Differences between minority and majority teacher candidates on licensing tests, 109–112 in average scores, 101–102 consequences of, 111–112 in impact of teacher licensure tests, 95, 97 on large-scale tests, 99 in passing rates, 102–109 on the SAT, 99–100 on teacher licensing tests, 101–109 and test bias, 110–111 Direct internship programs, in California’s teacher preparation system, 280–282 Disparities. See Differences between minority and majority teacher candidates on licensing tests E Early Adolescence/English Language Arts (EA/ ELA) standards, according to NBPTS, 302–303 advancing student learning in the classroom, 302

OCR for page 335
Testing Teacher Candidates: The Role of Licensure Tests in Improving Teacher Quality assessment center exercises, 305 portfolios, 304–305 preparing the way for productive student learning, 302 supporting student learning through long-range initiatives, 303 Early Childhood Longitudinal Survey, 135 Ebel’s method, of standard setting for teacher licensure tests, 65 Economic model of supply and demand for teachers, 287–297 demand for teachers, 293–294 equilibrium teacher wage and the number of competent teachers, 294–297 licensure testing, 288–293 no licensure testing model, 287–288 raising passing scores, 293 setting passing scores, 296–297 supply of teachers, 287–293 Educational Testing Service (ETS) teacher licensure tests, 4, 6, 48, 63, 69, 83–84, 113, 137, 149, 221–247 on basic skills, 221–222 on professional knowledge of teaching, 223 on subject area knowledge, 224–246 Educational values, teachers as transmitters of, 21 Elementary and Secondary Education Act, revised, 11 Entry Year Program, in Ohio, 315–316 Established standards of teacher quality, 23–32 teachers as committed to students and their learning, 23–26 teachers as managers and monitors of student learning, 28–29 teachers as members of a broader community, 30–32 teachers as possessing deep subject matter knowledge, 26–27 teachers as reflective about their teaching, 29–30 Ethnicity and test results. See Differences between minority and majority teacher candidates on licensing tests ETS. See Educational Testing Service teacher licensure tests ETS Standards for Quality and Fairness, 86 Evaluating teacher licensure tests, 6–8, 70–114, 167–170 and accountability, under Public Law 105– 244, 196–198 administration and scoring, 77–78 competencies to be assessed, 76 consistency, reliability, generalizability, and comparability, 79 costs and feasibility, 81 criteria for evaluating tests, 70–71 developing the assessment, 76–77 differences between minority and majority teacher candidates on, 99–109 evaluating the Praxis series tests, 86–95 evidence concerning validity, 71–75 examining disparate impact, 95, 97 field testing and exercise analysis, 77 long-term consequences of a licensure program, 81–82 meaning of disparities, 109–112 methodological issues in making comparisons, 97–98 policy options, 113 protection from corruptibility, 78 purpose of assessment, 75–76 score reporting and documentation, 79–80 selecting teacher licensure tests for review, 83–86 standard setting, 78–79 validation studies, 80–81 Evaluation framework, for teacher licensure tests, 75–82 Eventual passing rates, 97–98 Examination for the Certification of Educators in Texas (ExCET), 52 ExCET. See Examination for the Certification of Educators in Texas Experienced teachers, performance assessment by the NBPTS, 159–160, 298–308 F Feasibility considerations, in evaluating teacher licensure tests, 81 Field testing, in developing teacher licensure tests, 77 First-time passing rates, 97–98 FIRST Year Program in Ohio, 154, 315–316 Florida Professional Education Test, 53 Formative Induction Results in Stronger Teaching (FIRST) Year Program in Ohio, 154, 315–316 Fostering active inquiry and supportive classroom interactions, teachers as, according to INTASC , 210–211

OCR for page 335
Testing Teacher Candidates: The Role of Licensure Tests in Improving Teacher Quality G General knowledge currently used tests, 51 research on tests, 131–132 General provisions, under Public Law 105–244, 202 Generalizability, of teacher licensure tests, 79 Grants under Public Law 105–244 partnership, 190–193 state, 188–190 for teacher recruitment, 193–194 H Higher Education Act (HEA) Title II, 1, 8–9, 14, 138–145 Title IV, 2, 14–15 Higher education institutions, holding accountable for quality of teacher preparation, 8–9, 170–171 Hiring issues, 47 I Idaho’s teacher licensure system, 263–267 changes in initial teacher licensure system, 267 initial licensure requirements in, 57–58, 62 teacher education at Albertson College, 265–266 teacher education at Boise State University, 264–265 teacher education at Lewis-dark State College, 266–267 teacher preparation programs, 264–267 Illinois’ teacher licensure system, NES teacher licensure tests in, 251–253 Improving accountability with teacher licensure tests, 136–146 accountability and evaluation provisions of Title II, 139–141 concerns about accountability and evaluation provisions of Title II, 141–145 focusing teacher education on identified competencies, 136–138 holding states and higher education institutions accountable, 138–145 Improving teacher licensure testing, 147–162 analysis of alternatives, 158–162 Connecticut’s Beginning Teacher Induction Program, 153–154 NBPTS certification, 150–153 new and developing test systems, 150–158 Ohio’s teacher induction program, 154–156 performance-based teacher education at Alverno College, 156–158 selecting cases that use performance assessment, 148–150 Improving teacher quality and supply with teacher licensure tests, 115–135 directions for new research, 134–135 licensing tests and the quantity and quality of teachers, 116–121 research on teacher licensing tests and teacher competence, 121–134 Induction in Cincinnati, 155–156 in Connecticut, 153–154, 310–312 in Ohio, 154–156, 315–316 Initial licensure requirements, 56–62 in Alaska, 57–58 in California, 57, 59, 62 in Connecticut, 57, 60–61 designing tests of, 3–4, 165–166 in Idaho, 57–58, 62, 267 in Maryland, 57, 59–60, 62 in Nebraska, 57–59, 62 in Wyoming, 57–58, 62, 269 Initial Report of the Secretary on the Quality of Teacher Preparation, 46 Innovative methods, of measuring beginning teacher competence, 10, 171–172 Institutions of higher education, holding accountable for quality of teacher preparation, 8–9, 170–171 Instructional strategies, teachers as using varied, according to INTASC, 208 INTASC. See Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium Interstate Contract, 46 Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (INTASC), 4, 13, 16, 19–20, 23–32, 43, 53, 69, 153, 204– 214 active inquiry, teachers as fostering, 210– 211 adapting instruction to learner diversity, teachers as, 206–207 core standards, 205–214

OCR for page 335
Testing Teacher Candidates: The Role of Licensure Tests in Improving Teacher Quality Model Standards for Beginning Teacher Licensing and Development, 24, 204– 205 Performance Assessment Development Project, 148 teaching standards of, 204–214 Inventory of Teacher Knowledge of Reading, 133 J Judgmental policy capturing method, of standard setting for teacher licensure tests, 65 L LAST. See Liberal Arts and Sciences Test Learner diversity, teachers as adapting instruction to, according to INTASC, 206–207 Learning communities, teachers as members of, 30–32 according to INTASC, 213–214 according to NBPTS, 31, 219, 301 according to NCATE, 31 Learning experiences, teachers as creators of, according to INTASC, 205 Liberal Arts and Sciences Test (LAST), 51 License to Teach, A, 122 Licensing requirements, teaching compared with other professions, 38–41 Licensure tests for beginning teachers, 32, 34– 69, 288–293 appropriateness, of current tests measuring beginning teacher competence, 2–8, 164–170 currently used licensure tests, 47–55 designing, 3–4, 165–166 evaluating, 6–8, 167–170 initial licensure requirements in selected states, 56–62 making decisions about candidates based on, 4–5, 56, 166–167 professional licensing, 35–37 setting passing scores, 62–68 teacher licensure, 37–47 test results supporting decisions about candidates, 55–62 Long-range initiatives, supporting student learning in EA/ELA, according to NBPTS, 303 Long-term consequences, of a teacher licensure test program , 81–82 M Managers of student learning, teachers as, 28–29 according to NBPTS, 29, 218–219, 300–301 according to NCATE, 29 Maryland’s licensure system, 282–286 alternative certification program, 285–286 initial licensure requirements in, 57, 59–60, 62 Title II state grant, 286 traditional undergraduate teacher preparation programs, 284–285 Massachusetts Educator Certification Test (MECT), 54 Massachusetts licensure system, NES teacher licensure tests in, 253–254 Mathematics: Proofs, Models, and Problems, Part 1 test, evaluating, 84, 93–95, 101 Measuring beginning teacher competence, 2–8, 164–170 defining competent beginning teaching, 2–3, 164 designing licensure tests, 3–4, 165–166 evaluating licensure tests, 6–8, 167–170 holding programs accountable for quality of teacher preparation, 8–9, 170–171 innovative methods of, 10, 171–172 making decisions about candidates based on licensure tests, 4–5, 56 MECT. See Massachusetts Educator Certification Test Mentors support for in the BEST program, 313 training of in the PATHWISE Induction Program-Praxis III Version, 320–321 Michigan’s licensure system, NES teacher licensure tests in, 254–257 Middle School English/Language Arts test, evaluating, 84, 89, 91–93, 101 Minority teacher candidate differences in average scores, 101–102 on large-scale tests, 99 in passing rates, 102–109 on the SAT, 99–100 on teacher licensing tests, 101–109

OCR for page 335
Testing Teacher Candidates: The Role of Licensure Tests in Improving Teacher Quality Model Standards for Beginning Teacher Licensing and Development, 24, 204– 205 Modified Angoff method, of standard setting for teacher licensure tests, 65, 88, 90, 92, 96 Monitors of student learning, teachers as, 28–29 according to NBPTS, 29, 218–219, 300–301 according to NCATE, 29 MSAT. See Multiple Subjects Assessment for Teachers Multiple Subjects Assessment for Teachers (MSAT), 105–107 N National Academy of Sciences, 2, 15–16 National Assessment of Educational Progress tests, 99 National Association of State Directors of Teacher Education and Certification, 48, 62 Interstate Contract, 46 National Board for Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS), 13, 16, 20, 23–32, 35, 104, 148–150, 215–219 certification under, 145, 150–153 performance assessment of experienced teachers by, 159–160, 298–308 propositions of accomplished teaching, 215, 218–219, 300–301 support for teachers seeking certification in Connecticut, 309 What Teachers Should Know and Be Able to Do, 23–24 National Center for Education Statistics, 141 Early Childhood Longitudinal Survey, 135 National Commission on Teaching and America’s Future, 13 National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), 13, 19–20, 23–32, 42, 52, 214–215 Standards, Procedures and Policies for the Accreditation of Professional Education Units, 24 National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, 86 National Education Summit, 12 National Educational Longitudinal Study (NELS), 132 National Evaluation Systems (NES) teacher licensure tests, 4, 6, 48, 69, 113–114, 137, 248–262 Arizona, 248–249 California, 249–250 Colorado, 250–251 difficulties with, 84–86 Illinois, 251–253 Massachusetts, 253–254 Michigan, 254–257 New Mexico, 257 New York, 52, 257–258 Oklahoma, 258–260 Oregon, 260 selecting for review, 84–86 Texas, 260–262 National Institute of Child Health and Development, 134 National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth-Child Data, 135 National Science Foundation, 134 National Teachers Examinations (NTE), 133 Test of Professional Knowledge, 74 NBPTS. See National Board for Professional Teaching Standards NCATE. See National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education Nebraska’s teacher licensure system, 273–276 initial licensure requirements in, 57–59, 62 teacher education at Creighton University, 275–276 teacher education at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln, 274–275 teacher education at Wayne State College, 275 teacher preparation programs, 274–276 Title II state grant, 276 Nedelsky’s method, of standard setting for teacher licensure tests, 65 NELS. See National Educational Longitudinal Study NES. See National Evaluation Systems teacher licensure tests New Mexico’s teacher licensure system, NES teacher licensure tests in, 257 New York’s teacher licensure system, NES teacher licensure tests in, 257–258 No licensure testing model, 287–288 NTE. See National Teachers Examinations

OCR for page 335
Testing Teacher Candidates: The Role of Licensure Tests in Improving Teacher Quality O Ohio’s teacher induction program, 154–156 FIRST Year Program, 154, 315–316 PATHWISE Induction Program-Praxis III Version, 316–321 Oklahoma General Education Test, 51 Oklahoma’s teacher licensure system, NES teacher licensure tests in, 258–260 Oregon’s teacher licensure system, NES teacher licensure tests in, 260 Oscar and Luella Buros Center for Testing, 16, 83–84 P Partnership grants, under Public Law 105–244, 190–193 Passing rates and the differences between minority and majority teacher candidates on teacher licensing tests, 102–109 first-time and eventual, 97–98 Passing scores raising, 293 setting, 62–68, 296–297 Past definitions of teacher quality, 20–22 comparing across states, 67 teachers as personifications of virtue, 20–21 teachers as transmitters of cultural and educational values, 21 teachers’ competence in presenting the prescribed curricula, 22 PATHWISE Induction Program-Praxis III Version, 149, 316–321 classroom performance assessment, 318– 319 implementation in Ohio, 154–156, 320–321 training of mentors and assessors, 320–321 Pedagogical content knowledge, research on testing, 133–134 Pedagogical knowledge currently used licensure tests, 52–53 research on testing, 132–133 Performance assessment, of experienced teachers by the NBPTS, 298–308 Performance Assessment Development Project, 148 Performance-based teacher education at Alverno College, 156–158 Personifications of virtue, teachers as, 20–21 PLT. See Principles of Learning and Teaching (K-6) test Policy options, and teacher licensure tests, 113 Portfolio assessments in the BEST program, 312–313 in EA/ELA, according to NBPTS, 304–305 Positive social interaction, teachers as encouraging, according to INTASC, 208–210 Post baccalaureate teacher preparation, at the University of Alaska, 271–272 PPST. See Pre-Professional Skills Test in Reading Praxis I, 51 Praxis II, 51–55, 57 Core Battery tests, 51–52 revamping, 52 Praxis III, 154–155, 316–321 Praxis series tests, 48, 153 on basic skills, 221–222 Biology: Content Knowledge Tests, Parts 1 and 2, 84, 95–97, 101, 143 evaluating, 86–95 Mathematics: Proofs, Models, and Problems, Part 1 test, 84, 93–95, 101, 143 Middle School English/Language Arts test, 84, 89, 91–93, 101, 143 passing rates based on race, 108–109 Pre-Professional Skills Test in Reading, 84, 87–89, 101–104, 143 Principles of Learning and Teaching (K-6) test, 52, 84, 89–91, 101–104, 143 on professional knowledge of teaching, 223 selecting for review, 83–84 on subject area knowledge, 133, 224–246 Pre-Professional Skills Test (PPST) in Reading, evaluating, 84, 87–89, 101–104 Preinternship programs, in California’s teacher preparation system, 281–282 Preservice training, in Connecticut, 310 Principles for the Validation and Use of Personnel Selection Procedures, 70 Principles of Learning and Teaching (PLT) (K-6) test, 52, 68, 101–104 evaluating, 84, 89–91 Problems with measuring beginning teacher competence, 12–15 educational reform, 12–13 federal initiatives, 14–15 state initiatives, 13–14

OCR for page 335
Testing Teacher Candidates: The Role of Licensure Tests in Improving Teacher Quality Productive student learning, preparing the way for in EA/ELA, according to NBPTS, 302 Professional development, in Connecticut, 313– 314 Professional knowledge of teaching, list of Praxis tests on, 223 Professions, licensing requirements for, 38–41 Programs that prepare teachers accountability for, under Public Law 105– 244, 198–201 holding accountable for quality of teacher preparation, 8–9, 170–171 Protection, of teacher licensure tests from corruptibility, 78 Public Law 105–244, 187–203 accountability and evaluation, 196–198 accountability for programs that prepare teachers, 198–201 administrative provisions, 194–196 authorization of appropriations, 203 general provisions, 202 partnership grants, 190–193 purposes and definitions, 187–188 state functions, 201–202 state grants, 188–190 teacher recruitment grants, 193–194 Purposes and definitions, under Public Law 105–244, 187–188 Q Quality of teacher preparation, holding programs accountable for, 8–9, 170–171 R Race-based discrepancies in test performance. See Differences between minority and majority teacher candidates on licensing tests Reading Instruction Competence Assessment (RICA), 53, 148 Recommendations, 2–10, 165–172 Recruitment grants, under Public Law 105–244, 193–194 Redesign of teacher education, in Alaska initial teacher licensure system, 270–272 Reference and Reporting Guide for Preparing State and Institutional Reports on the Quality of Teacher Preparation, 141– 143 Reflective about their professional work, teachers as, 29–30 according to INTASC, 213 according to NBPTS, 30, 219, 301 Reliability, of teacher licensure tests, 79 Research on teacher licensing tests and teacher competence, 121–134 pedagogical content knowledge, 133–134 pedagogical knowledge, 132–133 subject matter knowledge, 132 tests of basic skills and general knowledge, 131–132 Review, of teacher licensure tests, 83–86 RICA. See Reading Instruction Competence Assessment Riley, Richard, 11 S SAT. See Scholastic Assessment Test Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT), 99–100 Science Research Associates Reading Achievement Series, 133 Scoring of teacher licensure tests, 77–78 reporting, 79–80 Selecting performance assessment cases, for teacher licensure testing, 148–150 Setting passing scores, 62–68 comparison across states, 67 current standards, 66–68 standard-setting methods, 63–66 Social interaction, teachers as encouraging positive, according to INTASC, 208– 210 Sputnik era, 22 Standard setting for teacher licensure tests, 63– 66, 78–79 benchmark method, 94 bookmarking method, 65 contrasting groups method, 65 Ebel’s method, 65 item-level pass/fail method, 94 judgmental policy capturing method, 65 modified Angoff method, 65, 88, 90, 92, 96 Nedelsky’s method, 65

OCR for page 335
Testing Teacher Candidates: The Role of Licensure Tests in Improving Teacher Quality Standards, Procedures and Policies for the Accreditation of Professional Education Units, 24 Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing, 64, 70, 84, 86 State functions, under Public Law 105–244, 201–202 State grants, under Public Law 105–244, 188– 190 State-specification of admission requirements for teacher education, 43 of course requirements in teacher education, 43–44 States alternative preparation programs for teachers, 44 comparisons of passing standards, 67 holding accountable for quality of teacher preparation, 8–9, 170–171 licensure tests currently used by, 48–54 provisions for licensure portability, 46 reporting provisions, 140 types of teaching licenses, 45–46 Student learning preparing the way for productive, 302 supporting through long-range initiatives in EA/ELA, according to NBPTS, 303 teachers as managers and monitors of, 28– 29, 218–219, 300–301 Students, teachers as committed to, 23–26 according to NBPTS, 26, 215, 218, 300 according to NCATE, 26 Studying measures of beginning teacher competence, 15–18 evidence collected, 16–18 Subject matter knowledge currently used licensure tests, 51–52 list of Praxis tests on, 224–246 research on testing, 132 teachers as possessing, 26–27 according to INTASC, 211 according to NBPTS, 27, 218, 300 according to NCATE, 27 Subject-specific pedagogical knowledge, currently used licensure tests, 53–54 Supply and demand for teachers, 287–297 demand, 293–294 equilibrium teacher wage and the number of competent teachers, 294–297 and licensure testing, 288–293 the no licensure testing model, 287–288 and raising passing scores, 293 and setting passing scores, 296–297 supply, 287–293 Support programs, beginning teacher, 46–47, 153–156, 310–311, 315–316 T Teacher Education Accrediting Council (TEAC), 42–43 Teacher education programs at Alaska’s private schools, 272 at Albertson College, 265–266 at Alverno College, abilities and learning outcomes in, 324 approval of, 42–43 at Boise State University, 264–265 at Creighton University, 275–276 focusing on identified competencies, 136– 138 holding accountable for quality of, 8–9, 170–171 in Idaho’s teacher licensure system, 264– 267 at Lewis-Clark State College, 266–267 in Nebraska’s teacher licensure system, 274–276 at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln, 274– 275 at Wayne State College, 275 in Wyoming’s teacher preparation system, 268–269 Teacher General Knowledge test, 51 Teacher licensure, 37–47 accreditation and approval of teacher education programs, 42–43 beginning teacher support programs, 46–47, 153–156, 310–311, 315–316 and hiring, 47 other state licensing requirements, 45 state-specified admission requirements for teacher education, 43 state-specified course requirements in teacher education, 43–44 states’ alternative preparation programs for teachers, 44 states’ provisions for licensure portability, 46 tests, 44 types of state teaching licenses, 45–46

OCR for page 335
Testing Teacher Candidates: The Role of Licensure Tests in Improving Teacher Quality Teacher licensure tests administration and scoring, 77–78 analysis of alternatives, 158–162 competencies to be assessed, 76 Connecticut’s portfolio assessment, 153– 154, 312–313 consistency, reliability, generalizability, and comparability, 79 costs and feasibility, 81 criteria for evaluating tests, 70–71 developing the assessment, 76–77 differences between minority and majority teacher candidates on, 99–109 evaluating, 70–114 evaluation framework, 75 evidence concerning validity, 71–75 examining disparate impact, 95, 97 field testing and exercise analysis, 77 improving, 147–162 improving accountability with, 136–146 long-term consequences of a licensure program, 81–82 meaning of disparities, 109–112 methodological issues about comparisons, 97–98 NBPTS certification, 150–153 new and developing test systems, 150–158 Ohio’s performance assessment program, 154–156, 316–319 performance-based teacher education at Alverno College, 156–158 policy options, 113 Praxis series tests, 86–95, 154–155, 318–319 protection from corruptibility, 78 purpose of assessment, 75–76 score reporting and documentation, 79–80 selecting teacher licensure tests for review, 83–86, 148–150 standard setting, 78–79 validation studies, 80–81 Teacher preparation. See Teacher education programs Teacher quality, 19–33 current definitions, 22–32 enhancement grants for states and partnerships, 187–203 established standards, 23–32 past definitions, 20–22 Teacher Quality and Student Achievement: A Review of State Policy Evidence, 122 Teacher Quality Enhancement Grants for States and Partnerships (Title II), 1, 8–9, 14, 145 accountability and evaluation provisions of, 139–141 in California’s teacher preparation system, 282 concerns about accountability and evaluation provisions of, 141–145 in Maryland’s licensure system, 286 in Nebraska’s teacher licensure system, 276 Teacher recruitment, grants under Public Law 105–244, 193–194 Teacher requirements, 263–286 Alaska initial teacher licensure system, 269– 272 California’s teacher preparation system, 276–282 Idaho’s teacher licensure system, 263–267 Maryland’s licensure system, 282–286 Nebraska’s teacher licensure system, 273– 276 Wyoming’s teacher preparation system, 267–269 Teachers economic model of supply and demand for, 287–297 seeking NBPTS certification, support for in Connecticut, 309 supply and demand for, 287–297 Teachers’ standards as committed to students and their learning, 23–26 as competent in presenting the prescribed curricula, 22 as managers and monitors of student learning, 28–29 as members of a broader community, 30–32 as personifications of virtue, 20–21 as possessing deep subject matter knowledge, 26–27 as reflective about their teaching, 29–30 as transmitters of cultural and educational values, 21 Teachers’ standards according to INTASC as adapting instruction to learner diversity, 206–207 as creators of learning experiences, 205 as encouraging positive social interaction, 208–210

OCR for page 335
Testing Teacher Candidates: The Role of Licensure Tests in Improving Teacher Quality as fostering active inquiry and supportive classroom interactions, 210–211 as part of a larger community, 213–214 as possessing subject matter knowledge, 211 as possessing understanding of children, 206 as reflective about their professional work, 213 as using formal and informal assessment strategies, 212–213 as using varied instructional strategies, 208 Teachers’ standards according to NBPTS as committed to students and their learning, 26, 215, 218, 300 as managers and monitors of student learning, 29 as managing and monitoring student learning, 218–219, 300–301 as members of a broader community, 31 as members of learning communities, 219, 301 as possessing deep subject matter knowledge, 27 as possessing subject matter knowledge, 218, 300 as reflective about their professional work, 219, 301 as reflective about their teaching, 30 Teachers’ standards according to NCATE as committed to students and their learning, 26 as managers and monitors of student learning, 29 as members of a broader community, 31 as possessing deep subject matter knowledge, 27 TECAT. See Texas Examination of Current Administrators and Teachers Technical documentation of teacher licensure tests, 79–80 Technical soundness, of current tests measuring beginning teacher competence, 2–8, 164–170 Test fairness issues. See Disparities Test of Basic Mathematical Understandings, 132 Test of Professional Knowledge, 74 Test of Teaching Knowledge (TTK), 53 Test preparation courses, 105 Test scale comparisons, 98 Tests. See Licensure tests for beginning teachers Tests at a Glance, 88, 94, 96 Texas Examination of Current Administrators and Teachers (TECAT), 132 Texas teacher licensure system, NES teacher licensure tests in, 260–262 Title II. See Teacher Quality Enhancement Grants for States and Partnerships Traditional teacher preparation programs in California’s teacher preparation system, 277–279 undergraduate, in Maryland’s licensure system, 284–285 Training of mentors and assessors, in the PATHWISE Induction Program-Praxis III Version, 320–321 Transmitters of cultural and educational values, teachers as, 21 TTK. See Test of Teaching Knowledge 2000 NASDTEC Manual, 84 U U.S. Supreme Court, 22 Uniform Guidelines for Employee Selection Procedures, 70 University internship programs, in California’s teacher preparation system, 279–280 U.S. Constitution, testing knowledge of, 57 U.S. Department of Education, 2, 15, 43, 48, 134, 139, 141, 145 U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, 35 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 134 U.S. Department of Labor, 134 V Validity of teacher licensure tests, evidence concerning, 71–75, 80–81 Varied instructional strategies, teachers as using, according to INTASC, 208 Virtue, teachers as personifications of, 20–21

OCR for page 335
Testing Teacher Candidates: The Role of Licensure Tests in Improving Teacher Quality W Waller, Willard, 20 What Matters Most: Teaching for America’s Future, 13 What Teachers Should Know and Be Able to Do, 23–24 Wisconsin’s teacher licensure system, licensing practices in, 330 World War II era measurement of personality traits, 21 Wyoming’s teacher preparation system, 267– 269 initial certification, 269 initial licensure requirements in, 57–58, 62 teacher preparation program, 268–269

OCR for page 335
Testing Teacher Candidates: The Role of Licensure Tests in Improving Teacher Quality This page in the original is blank.