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COLLOQUIUM ON Virulence and Defense in Host—Pathogen Interactions: Common Features Between Plants and Animals

NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES
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COLLOQUIUM ON Virulence and Defense in Host—Pathogen Interactions: Common Features Between Plants and Animals COLLOQUIUM ON Virulence and Defense in Host—Pathogen Interactions: Common Features Between Plants and Animals NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES WASHINGTON, D.C.

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COLLOQUIUM ON Virulence and Defense in Host—Pathogen Interactions: Common Features Between Plants and Animals NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES Colloquium Series In 1991, the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) inaugurated a series of scientific colloquia, several of which are held each year under the auspices of the NAS Council's Committee on Scientific Programs. Each colloquium addresses a scientific topic of broad and topical interest, cutting across two or more traditional disciplines. Typically two days long, colloquia are international in scope and bring together leading scientists in the field. Papers from colloquia are published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

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COLLOQUIUM ON Virulence and Defense in Host—Pathogen Interactions: Common Features Between Plants and Animals Contents PNAS Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America COLLOQUIUM Papers from the National Academy of Sciences Colloquium on Virulence and Defense in Host—Pathogen Interactions: Common Features Between Plants and Animals     INTRODUCTION       Pathogens and host: The dance is the same, the couples are different Noel Keen, Brian Staskawicz, John Mekalanos, Frederick Ausubel, and R. James Cook   1     COLLOQUIUM PAPERS       Striking a balance: Modulation of the actin cytoskeleton by Salmonella Jorge E. Galán and Daoguo Zhou   3     Structure and function of pectic enzymes: Virulence factors of plant pathogens Steven R. Herron, Jacques A. E. Benen, Robert D. Scavetta, Jaap Visser, and Frances Jurnak   11     Pseudomonas syringae Hrp type III secretion system and effector proteins Alan Collmer, Jorge L. Badel, Amy O. Charkowski, Wen-Ling Deng, Derrick E. Fouts, Adela R. Ramos, Amos H. Rehm, Deborah M. Anderson, Olaf Schneewind, Karin van Dijk, and James R. Alfano   19     Molecular and cell biology aspects of plague Guy R. Cornelis   27     A framework for interpreting the leucine-rich repeats of the Listeria internalins Michael Marino, Laurence Braun, Pascale Cossart, and Partho Ghosh   33     Acyl-homoserine lactone quorum sensing in Gram-negative bacteria: A signaling mechanism involved in associations with higher organisms Matthew R. Parsek and E. Peter Greenberg   38     Phenotypic variation and intracellular parasitism by Histoplasma capsulatum Silke Kügler, Tricia Schurtz Sebghati, Linda Groppe Eissenberg, and William E. Goldman   43     Exploitation of host cells by enteropathogenic Escherichia coli B. A. Vallance and B. B. Finlay   48     Genetic complexity of pathogen perception by plants: The example of Rcr3, a tomato gene required specifically by Cf-2 Mark S. Dixon, Catherine Golstein, Colwyn M. Thomas, Erik A. van der Biezen, and Jonathan D. G. Jones   56     Plants and animals share functionally common bacterial virulence factors Laurence G. Rahme, Frederick M. Ausubel, Hui Cao, Eliana Drenkard, Boyan C. Goumnerov, Gee W. Lau, Shalina Mahajan-Miklos, Julia Plotnikova, Man-Wah Tan, John Tsongalis, Cynthia L. Walendziewicz, and Ronald G. Tompkins   64     Role of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator in innate immunity to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections Gerald B. Pier   71     Bad bugs and beleaguered bladders: Interplay between uropathogenic Escherichia coli and innate host defenses Matthew A. Mulvey, Joel D. Schilling, Juan J. Martinez, and Scott J. Hultgren   78     AvrPto-dependent Pto-interacting proteins and AvrPto-interacting proteins in tomato Adam J. Bogdanove and Gregory B. Martin   85     Reactive oxygen and nitrogen intermediates in the relationship between mammalian hosts and microbial pathogens Carl Nathan and Michael U. Shiloh   90     Nitric oxide and salicylic acid signaling in plant defense Daniel F. Klessig, Jörg Durner, Robert Noad, Duroy A. Navarre, David Wendehenne, Dhirendra Kumar, Jun Ma Zhou, Jyoti Shah, Shuqun Zhang, Pradeep Kachroo, Youssef Trifa, Dominique Pontier, Eric Lam, and Herman Silva   98     The role of antimicrobial peptides in animal defenses Robert E. W. Hancock and Monisha G. Scott   105     Suramin inhibits initiation of defense signaling by systemin, chitosan, and a β-glucan elicitor in suspension-cultured Lycopersicon peruvianum cells Johannes Stratmann, Justin Scheer, and Clarence A. Ryan   111

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COLLOQUIUM ON Virulence and Defense in Host—Pathogen Interactions: Common Features Between Plants and Animals NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES COLLOQUIUM Virulence and Defense in Host-Pathogen Interactions: Common Features Between Plants and Animals1 DECEMBER 10–11, 1999 Friday, December 10 Virulence Mechanisms in Pathogens—Chair, R. James Cook Welcome and Expectations for the Colloquium, Noel T. Keen Jorge E. Galan, Yale University School of Medicine, “Modulation of the host-cell actin cytoskeleton by the Salmonella type III secretion system” Frances Jurnak, University of California, Irvine, “Structure and function of pectic enzymes—virulence factors of plant pathogens” Daniel A. Portnoy, University of California, Berkeley, “Mechanisms of Listeria monocytogenes pathogenesis” Alan Collmer, Cornell University, “Pseudomonas syringae effector proteins and their type III secretion and translocation ” Guy Cornelis, Catholic University, Brussels, Belgium, “Type III secretion and translocation of Yersinia Yops” Ulla Bonas, University of Halle, Germany, “Type III secretion and targeting of bacterial proteins from plant and animal pathogens by Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria” Virulence Mechanisms in Pathogens—Chair, John Mekalanos Jeff Miller, University of California, Los Angeles, “Signal transduction during the Bordetella infectious cycle” Partho Ghosh, University of California, San Diego, “Structure/function studies with internalin B of Listeria monocytogenes” Peter Greenberg, University of Iowa, “Communication systems and group behavior in Pseudomonas aeruginosa” William E. Goldman, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri “Phenotypic variation and intracellular survival of Histoplasma capsulatum” Brett Finlay, University of British Columbia, “Exploitation of host cells by enteropathogenic E. coli” David A. Relman, Stanford University, “Global host gene expression responses during infection” Saturday, December 11 Active Defense Mechanisms in Hosts—Chair, Brian Staskawicz Kathryn Anderson, Sloan–Kettering Institute, “Drosophila toll receptor pathways” Jonathan Jones, John Innes Institute, Norwich, England, “Role of toll-like proteins in disease resistance of plants” 1   The colloquium organizers wish to thank the following sponsors for their generous financial support for this meeting: Aventis Research & Technologies Gmbh & Co. DuPont Pharmaceuticals Company University of California Biotechnology Program The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation SmithKline Beecham Pharmaceuticals

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COLLOQUIUM ON Virulence and Defense in Host—Pathogen Interactions: Common Features Between Plants and Animals Lory Rahme, Harvard University, “Common themes of pathogenesis among plants, insects and mammals” Gourisankar Ghosh, University of California, San Diego, “The NF-κB pathway in vertebrates” Jeff Dangl, University of North Carolina, “Perception of pathogen signals by plants” Gerald Pier, Harvard University, “Innate defense mechanisms on mucosal surfaces: The Pseudomonas aeruginosa—CFTR paradigm” Active Defense Mechanisms in Hosts—Chair, Frederick Ausubel Matthew Mulvey, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis “Innate host defenses against uropathogenic E. coli” Gregory B. Martin, Boyce Thompson Institute, Cornell University, “Pathogen recognition and signal transduction mediated by the product of the Pto disease resistance gene” Carl Nathan, Weill Medical College, Cornell University, NY, “Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in animal defense: Mechanisms of microbial resistance” Dan Klessig, Rutgers University, “NO and salicylic acid signaling in plant defense” Robert Hancock, University of British Columbia, “Antimicrobial peptides in animal defense” Clarence A. Ryan, Washington State University, “Defense signaling and response pathways in plants against pests” Keynote Address—Chair, Brian J. Staskawicz David Baltimore, California Institute of Technology, “Isn't microbiology out-dated?”