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APPENDIX A

Committee Member Biographies

James J. Duderstadt (Chair) is President Emeritus and University Professor of Science and Engineering at the University of Michigan. He received his doctorate in engineering science and physics from the California Institute of Technology in 1967. He joined the faculty of the University of Michigan in 1968 and has served as Professor of Nuclear Engineering, Dean of the College of Engineering, and then as Provost and Vice-President for Academic Affairs. He was elected President of the University of Michigan in 1988 and served that role until July 1996.

William Arms is Professor of Computer Science at Cornell University, with research interests in digital libraries and electronic publishing. He has degrees from Oxford University, the London School of Economics, and the University of Sussex. During the 1970s, he was a faculty member at the British Open University, helping to develop some of the first computer science courses delivered by distance education. Subsequently, he was Vice Provost for Computing at Dartmouth College and Vice-President for Computing at Carnegie Mellon University. In these two positions he was responsible for early developments of campus networking, digital libraries, and the use of personal computing in education. Before joining Cornell in 1999, he spent four years at the Corporation for National Research Initiatives, as Vice-President.



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Page 55 APPENDIX A Committee Member Biographies James J. Duderstadt (Chair) is President Emeritus and University Professor of Science and Engineering at the University of Michigan. He received his doctorate in engineering science and physics from the California Institute of Technology in 1967. He joined the faculty of the University of Michigan in 1968 and has served as Professor of Nuclear Engineering, Dean of the College of Engineering, and then as Provost and Vice-President for Academic Affairs. He was elected President of the University of Michigan in 1988 and served that role until July 1996. William Arms is Professor of Computer Science at Cornell University, with research interests in digital libraries and electronic publishing. He has degrees from Oxford University, the London School of Economics, and the University of Sussex. During the 1970s, he was a faculty member at the British Open University, helping to develop some of the first computer science courses delivered by distance education. Subsequently, he was Vice Provost for Computing at Dartmouth College and Vice-President for Computing at Carnegie Mellon University. In these two positions he was responsible for early developments of campus networking, digital libraries, and the use of personal computing in education. Before joining Cornell in 1999, he spent four years at the Corporation for National Research Initiatives, as Vice-President.

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Page 56 Daniel E. Atkins earned an M.S.E.E. and Ph.D. in computer science from the University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana, in 1967 and 1970, respectively. He joined the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science as an assistant professor in 1972. In May of 1981, Atkins was promoted to the rank of full professor and in September of that year, in response to extraordinary opportunities in the College of Engineering, he joined the leadership team of the College as Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Studies. From January 1989 through July 1990 he served as interim Dean of the college of Engineering. Since the mid 1980s, Atkins has provided research leadership in the use of distributed computing/communication to support distributed forms for team-based knowledge work. He became founding Dean of the new School of Information in July 1992 and held that position until September 1998. He is now Director of the University of Michigan Alliance for Community Technology. Mark H. Ellisman is Professor of Neuroscience and Bioengineering and the Director of the Center for Research in Biological Structure at the University of California, San Diego, where he has taught since 1977. He received his masters degree in neurophysiology in 1974 and Ph.D. in molecular, cellular and developmental biology in 1976 from the University of Colorado at Boulder. He now directs the National Center for Microscopy and Imaging Research, an internationally acclaimed technology development center and research resource established by the National Institutes of Health. He is a pioneer in the development of three dimensional light and electron microscopy and combined application of these image acquisition tools and computational technologies to achieve greater understanding of the structure and function of the nervous system. Edward A. Fox holds a Ph.D. and M.S. in Computer Science from Cornell University. Since 1993 he has been at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, where he serves as Associate Director for Research at the Computing Center, and Professor of Computer Science. For the Association for Computing Machinery he served during 1988-91 as a member of the Publications Board and as editor in chief of ACM Press Database Products. He is editor for the Morgan Kaufmann Publishers book series on multimedia information and systems and serves on many editorial boards.

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Page 57 Paul Messina is Assistant Vice President for Scientific Computing at the California Institute of Technology, Faculty Associate in Scientific Computing, and Director of Caltech's Center for Research on Parallel Computation. He is Chief Architect for the National Partnership for Advanced Computational Infrastructure, an UCSD-led partnership established by the National Science Foundation. He received his Ph.D. in mathematics in 1972 and his M.S. in applied mathematics in 1967, both from the University of Cincinnati. In 1997 the University of Lecce, Italy, awarded him an honorary degree in computer engineering, for his contributions to computational science. Helen Nissenbaum is a Research Associate and Lecturer at the University Center for Human Values, Princeton University. She teaches and conducts research in the area of social and ethical dimensions of science and technology, focusing on information and communications technology. She is author of Emotion in Focus (University of Chicago Press), and co-editor (with D. J. Johnson) of Computers, Ethics and Social Values (Prentice Hall). In 1998, as co-principal investigator for an interdisciplinary study of human values in Web browser security, she was awarded a three-year research grant from the National Science Foundation. She serves on the Board of Directors of the Society for Philosophy and Technology, and as co-editor of the journal Ethics and Information Technology. She earned her M.A. in Education and Ph.D. in philosophy from Stanford University. Ben Shneiderman is a Professor in the Department of Computer Science, Head of the Human-Computer Interaction Laboratory, and Member of the Institute for Advanced Computer Studies and for Systems Research, all at the University of Maryland at College Park. He is the author of Software Psychology: Human Factors in Computer and Information Systems (1980) and Designing the User Interface: Strategies for Effective Human-Computer Interaction (1987, second edition, 1992, third edition, 1998). He is on the Board of Directors of Spotfire, Inc. and has been on the editorial advisory boards of nine journals. He received his Ph.D. from State University of New York at Stony Brook in 1973. He received an honorary doctorate of science from the University of Guelph, Ontario, Canada, in 1996 and was elected a fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) in 1997 and of the AAAS in 2001.