Biosketches

WARREN K.SINCLAIR, PhD, is president emeritus of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. Dr. Sinclair received his BSc and MSc from the University of New Zealand and his PhD from the University of London. His scientific interests include radiation protection, radiation physics, and radiation-risk estimation. Dr. Sinclair has served as professor of physics and of zoology at the University of Texas and as senior biophysicist and associate laboratory director at Argonne National Laboratory; he is currently professor emeritus at the University of Chicago. He has served on the International Commission on Radiation Units and on the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and is an Emeritus Member of ICRP. He is the alternate delegate to the UN Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation and serves on committees of the IAEA and the CEC and on the board of the RERF. He has been a member of many national committees for the Department of Energy, National Aeronautic and Space Administration, National Institutes of Health, Veterans Administraton and the National Research Council, where he also served as chair of the Board on Radiation Effects Research. He is a member of numerous professional associations, including the Radiation Research Society (former president), the Society of Nuclear Medicine, the Society for Risk Analysis, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (former president), the Health Physics Society, the Society of Nuclear Medicine, and the Radiological Society of North America.

HAROLD M.AGNEW, PhD, is the former director of Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (now Los Alamos National Laboratory) and the retired president of General Atomics in San Diego. He received his AB from the University of Denver and his MS and PhD from the University of Chicago. His research interests



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 194
Status of the Dosimetry for the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (DS86) Biosketches WARREN K.SINCLAIR, PhD, is president emeritus of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. Dr. Sinclair received his BSc and MSc from the University of New Zealand and his PhD from the University of London. His scientific interests include radiation protection, radiation physics, and radiation-risk estimation. Dr. Sinclair has served as professor of physics and of zoology at the University of Texas and as senior biophysicist and associate laboratory director at Argonne National Laboratory; he is currently professor emeritus at the University of Chicago. He has served on the International Commission on Radiation Units and on the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and is an Emeritus Member of ICRP. He is the alternate delegate to the UN Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation and serves on committees of the IAEA and the CEC and on the board of the RERF. He has been a member of many national committees for the Department of Energy, National Aeronautic and Space Administration, National Institutes of Health, Veterans Administraton and the National Research Council, where he also served as chair of the Board on Radiation Effects Research. He is a member of numerous professional associations, including the Radiation Research Society (former president), the Society of Nuclear Medicine, the Society for Risk Analysis, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (former president), the Health Physics Society, the Society of Nuclear Medicine, and the Radiological Society of North America. HAROLD M.AGNEW, PhD, is the former director of Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (now Los Alamos National Laboratory) and the retired president of General Atomics in San Diego. He received his AB from the University of Denver and his MS and PhD from the University of Chicago. His research interests

OCR for page 194
Status of the Dosimetry for the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (DS86) include nuclear physics and its application to defense, energy, and the biological sciences. Dr. Agnew served as the scientific adviser to the Supreme Allied Commander Europe (NATO) and as chairman of the General Advisory Committee to the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency. He has served on the White House Science Council and is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. He is a member of Sigma Xi and a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and a fellow of the American Physical Society. Dr. Agnew was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1976 and the National Academy of Sciences in 1979. He received the E.O.Lawrence Award from the Atomic Energy Commission and the Enrico Fermi Award from the Department of Energy. Dr. Agnew served two terms in the New Mexico State Senate as the first senator from Los Alamos County. HAROLD L.BECK, BS, retired in 1999 as the director of the Environmental Sciences Division of the Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) in New York City. Mr. Beck previously served as the director of the EML Instrumentation Division and as acting deputy director of the laboratory. Mr. Beck received a BS degree from the University of Miami summa cum laude and did graduate work in physics and mathematics at Cornell University from 1960 to 1962. He is the author or coauthor of over 100 publications in radiation physics, radiation protection, environmental radiation, dosimetry, and instrumentation. His development of the scientific approach to reconstructing fallout doses to the US population from above-ground nuclear-weapons tests in Nevada earned him the DOE Meritorious Service Award in 1988, the second highest award in the department. Mr. Beck is the scientific vice-president of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) for radiation measurement and the chair of NCRP Scientific Committee 93, on radiation measurement. He also chaired Scientific Committee 64–20, on surface soil contamination. Mr. Beck was a US delegate to the International Electrotechnical Commission’s Scientific Committee 45B, on radiation protection instrumentation. He is a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Nuclear Society, and the Institute of Electronic and Electrical Engineers, and he is a fellow of the Health Physics Society. ROBERT F.CHRISTY, PhD, is a professor emeritus at the California Institute of Technology. Dr. Christy received his BA and his MA from the University of British Columbia and his PhD from the University of California. His research interests include the effects of cosmic rays, astrophysics, and nuclear physics. Dr. Christy has held several academic positions throughout his distinguished career and, most notably, served the California Institute of Technology in several capacities over the last fifty years. Dr. Christy is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the International Astronomers Union, the American Physical Society, and the American Astronomers Society.

OCR for page 194
Status of the Dosimetry for the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (DS86) SUE B.CLARK, PhD is a Meyer Distinguished Professor in the College of Sciences and an Associate Professor of Chemistry at Washington State University in Pullman, Washington. Her current research areas include the environmental chemistry of plutonium and other actinides, chemistry of high level radioactive waste systems, and chemistry of actinide bearing solid phases in natural environments. Her research efforts are supported by grants from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Environmental Management Sciences Program, Natural and Accelerated Biological Remediation Program, Nuclear Education and Energy Research Program, Basic Energy Sciences Program, and contracts from British Nuclear Fuels Inc., as well as organizations at the Hanford and Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory sites. She holds a BS degree from Lander College (Greenwood, SC) and MS and PhD degrees in chemistry from Florida State University (Tallahassee, FL). Prior to joining Washington State University in 1996, she was an assistant research ecologist at the University of Georgia’s Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (1992–1996), and senior scientist at Westinghouse Savannah River Company’s Savannah River Technology Center (1989–1992). She is involved in numerous service activities; she serves on various committees for the National Research Council’s Board on Radioactive Waste Management, as well as the Committee on Dosimetry for the Radiation Effects Research Foundation. She has received several awards, including the Young Faculty Achievement Award in the College of Sciences at Washington State University (1998–1999), a Young Investigator Award, National Academy of Sciences Program on Nuclear Accidents and Radioactive Contamination (1993–1994), and the George Westinghouse Signature Award of Excellence, Westinghouse Corporation (1991). She is a member of the American Chemical Society and Sigma Xi, the Scientific Research Society. NAOMI HARLEY, PhD, is a research professor of environmental medicine at New York University (NYU) School of Medicine. Dr. Harley received her PhD in radiological physics from NYU, her ME in nuclear engineering from New York University, her BE in electrical engineering from The Cooper Union, and an APC in management from the NYU Graduate Business School. Dr. Harley serves on the Medical Isotopes Committee at NYU Medical School, she is a Council Member in the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP), and is an adviser to the US Delegation of the UN Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation. She is a member of the Editorial Board of the journal Environment International. She was elected a fellow in the Health Physics Society. She has published over 100 journal articles and chapters in six books, and she holds three patents at NYU for radiation detection devices. She chairs an NCRP committee on the health effects of radon and is the president of the Radon Section in the Health Physics Society. Her current research involves the dosimetry of internally deposited radionuclides, the measurement of radiation and radioactivity, and risk modeling of radiation carcinogenesis.

OCR for page 194
Status of the Dosimetry for the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (DS86) ALBRECHT KELLERER, PhD, is the director of the Radiobiological Institute of the University of Munich and of the Institute of Radiation Biology of the Forschungszentrum für Umwelt und Gesundhelt (GSF), National Research Center for Environment and Health. He was formerly professor of radiation biophysics at Columbia University, and later professor and chief of the institute for medical radiation research at the University of Wurzburg. Dr. Kellerer’s research specialties include microdosimetry, radiation-risk assessment, and radiobiology. He is a member of the German National Commission for Radiation Protection, chairman of its committee for risk assessment, and a member of committees of International Commission of Radiation Units and measurements and International Council for Radiation Protection. Dr. Kellerer is the managing editor of the Journal of Radiation and Environmental Physics. KENNETH J.KOPECKY, PhD, is a member of the Division of Public Health Sciences of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and an affiliate professor in the Department of Biostatistics at the University of Washington in Seattle, Washington. He earned his PhD in statistics from Oregon State University. He was formerly a research associate at the Radiation Effects Research Foundation in Hiroshima, Japan, and a member of the Technical Steering Panel for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project. He is a coinvestigator in the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study and in the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center—Russian project of the International Consortium for Research on the Health Effects of Radiation. WAYNE M.LOWDER, AB, received his degree in physics from Harvard University and did graduate work in physics at Columbia University and the International School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Argonne National Laboratory. He was physicist and later director of the Radiation Physics Division, Environmental Measurements Laboratory, Department of Energy (DOE), before his retirement in 1994. His primary fields of research were the physical properties, measurement, and dosimetry of natural and human-made radiation and radionuclides in the environment. He co-organized the five international symposiums on the natural radiation environment (1963–1995) and served on committees of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements and the International Commission on Radiological Protection and in the secretariat of the UN Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation. From 1978–1986, he assisted the DOE Office of Health and Environmental Research in developing research programs in radiation measurement and dosimetry and on environmental radon. Prior to his service on the Committee on Dosimetry for RERF, he was the DOE representative to the National Research Council committee chaired by Frederick Seitz that over-saw the development of DS86.

OCR for page 194
Status of the Dosimetry for the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (DS86) ALVIN M.WEINBERG, PhD, is a distinguished fellow with the Oak Ridge Associated Universities. Dr. Weinberg is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering. He has performed extensive research on the design, development, and safety of nuclear reactors and is knowledgeable in risk assessment and analysis. ROBERT W.YOUNG, PhD, is a radiation health-effects consultant with special interests in biological effects of neutrons, dose-determination methods for the definition of human health effects, and modeling of the physiological consequences of exposure to ionizing radiation. During the last thirty years, he served as director of the Biomedical Research Program at the Defense Nuclear Agency and as a division head at the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute. During that time, he developed and directed programs in biological dosimetry, modeling of physiological effects of ionizing radiation, and effects of ionizing radiation, especially neutrons, on the nervous system. Dr. Young has chaired the NATO Project Group on Radiation Anti-emetic Drugs, served on committees for the International Atomic Energy Agency, provided expert advice to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and served on the White House committee on the Chernobyl nuclear accident. He earned his MA and PhD at the Catholic University of America. Dr. Young has a long-standing interest in dose-determination methods for Hiroshima and Nagasaki and has served the National Research Council Committee on Dosimetry for the RERF as technical adviser and as ad hoc head of the Technical Working Group on Hiroshima neutron calculation. His current interest is in dose reconstruction for epidemiologic studies of radiation risk. MARCO ZAIDER, PhD, is attending physician and head of brachytherapy physics at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and professor of physics (in radiology) at Cornell Medical School. He also served as a professor of clinical radiation oncology, public health, and applied physics in the department of applied physics at Columbia University. Dr. Zaider is also the director of the graduate program in medical physics at Columbia University. He received his MSc from the University of Bucharest and his PhD from the University of Tel Aviv. Dr. Zaider’s scientific interests include radiation biophysics, microdosimetry, and medical physics. Dr. Zaider is the coauthor of Microdosimetry and Its Applications.