Page 170

D

Abbreviated Description of U.S. Navy Short-Range Missile Defense Weapon Systems

D.1 PHALANX CLOSE-IN WEAPON SYSTEM (CIWS)

  • Low-cost, inner-layer self-defense system,

  • Proposed in 1968, IOC in 1980; now on almost every combatant,

  • Original system, completely autonomous; now integrated into SSDS and some Aegis weapon systems,

  • 6-barrel gattling gun, 4500 rounds per minute, 500-round burst,

  • 5-burst magazine, 1.1-km/s muzzle velocity,

  • Ku-band radar, closed-loop tracking of targets and bullets,

  • 20-mm depleted uranium shells, replaced with tungsten,

  • Deliberate dispersion of shells to compensate for pointing errors,

  • Range 5 km to 300 m, hit-to-kill,

  • Effectiveness low outside a few kilometers and inside 0.5 km,

  • Warhead detonation is the only effective short-range kill mechanism,

  • Limited capability against maneuvering targets,

  • Has engaged Exocets and Harpoons successfully in exercise demonstrations,

  • Many versions in fleet with various upgrades,

  • Block IB upgrade provided capability against surface targets, helicopters, and aircraft,

  • Forward-looking infrared electro-optical imager/tracker, man-in-the-loop, and

  • In the mid-1990s, was replaced with RAM in capital ships.



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OCR for page 170
Page 170 D Abbreviated Description of U.S. Navy Short-Range Missile Defense Weapon Systems D.1 PHALANX CLOSE-IN WEAPON SYSTEM (CIWS) Low-cost, inner-layer self-defense system, Proposed in 1968, IOC in 1980; now on almost every combatant, Original system, completely autonomous; now integrated into SSDS and some Aegis weapon systems, 6-barrel gattling gun, 4500 rounds per minute, 500-round burst, 5-burst magazine, 1.1-km/s muzzle velocity, Ku-band radar, closed-loop tracking of targets and bullets, 20-mm depleted uranium shells, replaced with tungsten, Deliberate dispersion of shells to compensate for pointing errors, Range 5 km to 300 m, hit-to-kill, Effectiveness low outside a few kilometers and inside 0.5 km, Warhead detonation is the only effective short-range kill mechanism, Limited capability against maneuvering targets, Has engaged Exocets and Harpoons successfully in exercise demonstrations, Many versions in fleet with various upgrades, Block IB upgrade provided capability against surface targets, helicopters, and aircraft, Forward-looking infrared electro-optical imager/tracker, man-in-the-loop, and In the mid-1990s, was replaced with RAM in capital ships.

OCR for page 170
Page 171 D.2 SEA SPARROW MISSILE SYSTEM (RIM-7) Concept study in 1960s, using then-current ASCMs and aircraft as the threat, RIM-7H program begun about 1970 with multinational group (4 countries, grew to 13), Became the standard NATO ship self-defense missile, RIM-7M (Block II) introduced in 1978, Weapon system concept consists of three elements: L-band radar + IFF + RIM-7P programmable computer introduced in 1990, Mk-23 target acquisition system, Automatic fire control system (manned only to intervene in automatic process); Mk-57, Current sea sparrow missile (RIM-7P), based on Navy AIM-7F sparrow air-to-air missile, Same booster, guidance, and control with remote arming and “homing all the way” guidance, 20-cm (8-in.) diameter, 3.65 m long, 1-m wingspan, 350 m/s average speed, boost + coast, Motor-boost (3 seconds) + sustain (15 seconds), Optimum intercept range 1.5 to 6.5 km (6 to 25 s flight time), Weight 232 kg, Semiactive RF monopulse seeker, Target continuously illuminated by ship's radar, Warhead weighs 35 kg and is blast fragmenting, RF proximity fuse, Now on CVNs, LHDs, AOEs, AORs, DD963s, Not on older amphibious ships, and Has hit nonmaneuvering Styx and Exocet missiles in exercises. D.3 ROLLING AIRFRAME MISSILE (RAM) MK-31 GUIDED MISSILE SYSTEM Concept developed at Johns Hopkins University/Applied Physics Laboratory in the early 1970s to counter RF-emitting ASCMs, Missile dimensions: 12-cm (5-in.) diameter, 2.8 m long, 45-cm wingspan, 2 steerable canards and 4 tailfins for roll control, Missile weight: 74 kg, Employs Sidewinder solid rocket motor (Mk 36-8 or Mk 112), Boost (5 s) + glide, Optimum intercept range: 0.8 to 5 km (3 to 10 s), Launcher: 21-cell Mk-49,

OCR for page 170
Page 172 Launch rate: one every 3 s, Original seeker was “fire and forget,” using passive, dual-mode (RF/IR)stinger missile seeker, Acquisition and initial track using RF from incoming missile, Transfer to IR for terminal-track, reticle scan in 4.1- to 4.5-mm band, Block I upgrade (RAM II) uses a linear-array IR detector in seeker, Dual-mode RF/IR or IR only, Completed operation tests, entered fleet in 1999, Maneuverable up to about 25 g, Engaged a maneuvering Vandal missile during an exercise, 9.5-kg warhead with 3-kg high explosive, New low-altitude fuze, Dual-thrust motor, Possible RAM upgrades, Larger diameter (14 cm to 15.5 cm), greater range, Maintains high velocity over entire trajectory, Increased maneuverability, Uplink to missile will allow target acquisition in bad weather, Sea RAM, Industry development in response to British navy request, Shorter inner range, faster response time, Uses phalanx 1B's high-resolution, target-search-and-track sensor, and CIWS 20-mm gun is replaced with RAM Block I, 11-tube launcher.