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Biographies of Committee Members

Alan Berman is currently a part-time employee of the Center for Naval Analyses, where he assists with analyses of Navy R&D investment programs, space operation capabilities, and information operations. He also consults for the Applied Research Laboratory of Pennsylvania State University (ARL/PSU), where he provides general management support and program appraisal. Dr. Berman's background is in defense science and technology, particularly in regard to advanced weapon and combat systems. He is regarded as a leading expert on combat systems. Positions he has held include, among others, dean of the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Miami and director of research at the Naval Research Laboratory. Dr. Berman has served on numerous government advisory and scientific boards. He is currently a member of the Naval Studies Board (NSB). He is also a member of the Free Electron Laser (FEL) oversight board, which advises Jefferson National Laboratory of the Department of Energy on its FEL program.

Roy R. Buehler is retired from Lockheed Martin Aeronautical Systems, where he managed Lockheed Martin's U.S. Customs Service line of business. Mr. Buehler's background is in antiair and antisurface warfare and airborne early warning systems. He has more than 30 years of experience in industry and government as an experimental test pilot, business planner, and program manager in the start-up of new aircraft programs such as the F-111, F-14, F-18, A-6, and F-22/Naval Advanced Tactical Fighter. He served in the Navy both as a carrier fighter pilot and as an experimental test pilot and major program manager. Mr. Buehler is a member of the Society of Experimental Test Pilots.



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Page 173 E Biographies of Committee Members Alan Berman is currently a part-time employee of the Center for Naval Analyses, where he assists with analyses of Navy R&D investment programs, space operation capabilities, and information operations. He also consults for the Applied Research Laboratory of Pennsylvania State University (ARL/PSU), where he provides general management support and program appraisal. Dr. Berman's background is in defense science and technology, particularly in regard to advanced weapon and combat systems. He is regarded as a leading expert on combat systems. Positions he has held include, among others, dean of the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Miami and director of research at the Naval Research Laboratory. Dr. Berman has served on numerous government advisory and scientific boards. He is currently a member of the Naval Studies Board (NSB). He is also a member of the Free Electron Laser (FEL) oversight board, which advises Jefferson National Laboratory of the Department of Energy on its FEL program. Roy R. Buehler is retired from Lockheed Martin Aeronautical Systems, where he managed Lockheed Martin's U.S. Customs Service line of business. Mr. Buehler's background is in antiair and antisurface warfare and airborne early warning systems. He has more than 30 years of experience in industry and government as an experimental test pilot, business planner, and program manager in the start-up of new aircraft programs such as the F-111, F-14, F-18, A-6, and F-22/Naval Advanced Tactical Fighter. He served in the Navy both as a carrier fighter pilot and as an experimental test pilot and major program manager. Mr. Buehler is a member of the Society of Experimental Test Pilots.

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Page 174 William A. Davis, Jr., an independent consultant, retired as deputy program manager for ballistic missile defense (BMD) in 1982 following 33 years of government service. Today Mr. Davis serves as an independent consultant on technology matters relating to national missile defense (NMD) and BMD. His recent clients include the Joint Ballistic Missile Defense Office and the Army NMD Program Office. Mr. Davis's background is in tactical and strategic missile defense, as well as missile research and development. Upon retirement from the government, Mr. Davis served as vice president for space defense at Teledyne Brown Engineering, where he directed simulation and analysis of tactical warning/attack assessment network and space-based elements of the Strategic Defense Initiative. Mr. Davis has served on numerous government advisory and scientific boards, including Department of Defense task forces on tactical missile research and development. Larry E. Druffel is president of South Carolina Research Authority, a public, nonprofit organization engaged in applying advanced technology to increase industrial competitiveness. Previously, he was director of the Software Engineering Institute and served as the vice president for business development at Rational Software. Earlier in his career, Dr. Druffel was on the faculty at the U.S. Air Force Academy. He later managed research programs in advanced software technology at DARPA, was founding director of the ADA Joint Program Office, and then served as director of computer systems and software (Research and Advanced Technology) in the Office of the Secretary of Defense. He is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM). Brig “Chip” Elliott is principal scientist at BBN Technologies. Mr. Elliott's background is in Internet and wireless network technologies, tactical communications systems, and space-based surveillance and communications. As the technical lead scientist at BBN, he uses Internet technology to build networks for international corporations and U.S. government agencies. He was the chief architect for the networking component of the Army's Near-Term Digital Radio Program, which forms the backbone of the Army's Tactical Internet; for the British Army's High Capacity Data Radio network; and for the Canadian Army's IRIS network. He has also acted as lead for a number of LEO satellite systems (Discoverer II, SBIRS-low, Celestri) as well as a proposed undersea network. Frank A. Horrigan retired from the Technical Development Staff for Sensors and Electronic Systems at Raytheon Systems Company. Dr. Horrigan has a broad general knowledge of all technologies relevant to military systems. A theoretical physicist by training, he has more than 35 years of experience in advanced electronics, electro-optics, radar and sensor technologies, and advanced information systems. In addition, he has extensive experience in planning and

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Page 175 managing IR&D investments and in projecting future technology growth directions. Dr. Horrigan once served as a NATO fellow at the Saclay Nuclear Research Center in France. Today he serves on numerous scientific boards and advisory committees, including the NRC's Army Research Laboratory Technical Assessment Board and Naval Studies Board, and he recently served on the Committee for the Review of ONR's Uninhabited Combat Air Vehicles (as its chair). Richard J. Ivanetich is director of the Computer and Software Engineering Division at the Institute for Defense Analyses (IDA). Dr. Ivanetich has extensive experience in missile and defense systems technology, particularly in regard to the system architecture design of information systems relating to strategic and theater nuclear forces. Before becoming director, Dr. Ivanetich was assistant director of the Systems Evaluation Division at IDA. Before joining IDA, he was an assistant professor of physics at Harvard University. Dr. Ivanetich is a member of the Naval Studies Board. Harry W. Jenkins, a retired major general in the U.S. Marine Corps, is director of business development and congressional liaison at ITT Industries-Defense, where he is responsible for activities in support of tactical communications systems and airborne electronic warfare between the Navy, Marine Corps, National Guard, and appropriate committees in Congress. General Jenkins' operational background is in expeditionary warfare, particularly in its mission use of C4I systems. During Desert Storm, General Jenkins served as the commanding general of the Fourth Marine Expeditionary Brigade, directing operational planning, training, and employment of the ground units, aviation assets, and command and control systems in the 17,000-man amphibious force. General Jenkins's last position before retirement from the Marine Corps was director of Expeditionary Warfare for the Chief of Naval Operations; as director, he initiated a detailed program for C4I systems improvements for large-deck amphibious ships and reorganized the Navy's UAV efforts for operations from aircraft carriers and amphibious ships. He is a member of numerous professional societies, including the Navy League and the Aerospace Industries Association. David V. Kalbaugh is head of the Power Projection Systems Department at the Johns Hopkins University/Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL), where he is responsible for the enhancement of U.S. military forces through the development and test of power projection (strike warfare) systems and technologies. Dr. Kalbaugh's background is in missile, precision strike, and tactical and strategic communication systems. He joined JHU/APL in 1969 and was involved in the development of the Tomahawk cruise missile system at its inception in the early 1970s. In addition to his supervisory and management duties, Dr. Kalbaugh taught for more than a decade in JHU's Whiting School of Engineering. He has served on numerous government and scientific advisory boards, including par-

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Page 176 ticipation in tasks for the Undersecretary of Defense for Acquisition and the Program Executive Officer for Theater Air Defense. Frank Kendall is an independent consultant with more than 25 years of engineering, management, and national security experience in both the private and government sectors. In government, he had assignments in the Department of Defense in systems engineering and acquisition management, including positions in the Office of the Secretary of Defense as the director of Tactical Warfare Programs and as Assistant Deputy Undersecretary of Defense for Strategic Defensive Systems. Mr. Kendall was formerly the vice president of engineering at the Raytheon Company and also spent 10 years on active duty with the Army, serving as an air defense missile unit commander and as assistant professor of engineering at West Point. He has served on numerous government and scientific advisory boards. He is a member of the Army Science Board and vice chairman of the Defense Intelligence Agency S&T Board, and he has served as a consultant on several Defense Science Board studies. L. David Montague, an independent consultant, is retired president of the Missile Systems Division at Lockheed Martin Missiles and Space. Mr. Montague, a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE), has a strong background in military weapon systems, particularly in regard to guidance and control of submarine-launched weaponry. His experience has focused on both tactical and strategic strike systems as well as on the requirements for, development of, and policy issues related to defense systems to protect against weapons of mass destruction. His recent research interests include electric vehicles powered by battery or fuel cells integrated with induction-drive, high-speed highway automatic headway and vehicle control. Mr. Montague is a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics and has served on numerous government and scientific advisory boards, including task forces for both the Army and the Defense Science Board. F. Robert Naka is president and CEO of CERA, Inc. Dr. Naka, a member of the NAE, has a strong background in reconnaissance, surveillance, and communication and command systems, components, and technologies. He is widely known for his contributions to the development of National security systems and his contributions in materials and sensor technologies for advanced military systems. Dr. Naka's career has spanned a broad range of assignments, including research and teaching duties at the university level and serving as the Air Force's chief scientist. Dr. Naka has served on numerous government and scientific advisory boards, including the NRC's Air Force Studies Board, in 1972-1975 and 1978-1982, and, recently, the Committee on Counterforce Options Against Tactical Missile Systems. J. Theodore Parker, retired vice admiral, U.S. Navy, is an independent consult-

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Page 177 ant. Admiral Parker's background is in research and development and in military operations relating to ship air defense systems. In his operational tours as flag officer, Admiral Parker commanded Service Group Two, the Mobile Logistics Support Force for the Atlantic Fleet. Additionally, he commanded the Operational and Test and Evaluation Force that tested new weapon system designs for the Navy. Before retiring in 1989, Admiral Parker served as director of the Defense Nuclear Agency. C. Kumar N. Patel is the former vice chancellor of research at the University of California at Los Angeles, where he is now serving as a professor. Until 1993, Dr. Patel served as executive director of the Research, Materials Science, Engineering, and Academic Affairs Division at AT&T Bell Laboratories. Dr. Patel, a member of the NAE and NAS, has an extensive background in several fields, including materials, lasers, and electro-optical devices. During his career at AT&T, which began in 1961, he made numerous seminal contributions in several fields, including gas lasers, nonlinear optics, molecular spectroscopy, pollution detection, and laser surgery. Dr. Patel has served on numerous government and scientific advisory boards. He is past president of Sigma Xi and of the American Physical Society. In addition, Dr. Patel has received numerous honors, including the National Medal of Science, for his invention of the carbon dioxide laser. Nils R. Sandell, Jr., is president and CEO of ALPHATECH, Incorporated. Dr. Sandell's background includes automatic target recognition and sensor management technologies, as well as algorithms for airborne reconnaissance and tracking and sensor resource management for ground moving target indicator and synthetic aperture radar. At ALPHATECH, he is currently responsible for projects that are developing, planning, and scheduling algorithms for airborne reconnaissance platforms. He is a former associate professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he lectured in the areas of estimation and control theory, stochastic processes, and computer systems. Howard E. Shrobe is associate director and principal research scientist of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (MIT AII). Dr. Shrobe's research is in intelligent systems, particularly in regard to knowledge-based software development. From 1994 to 1997, Dr. Shrobe served as assistant director and chief scientist of the DARPA Information Technology Office, where he was responsible for the Evolutionary Design of Complex Software and Information Survivability programs. At MIT AII, Dr. Shrobe's research efforts include knowledge-based collaboration webs, dynamic domain architecture, and intelligent information infrastructure projects. John P. Stenbit is executive vice president of TRW, Inc. Mr. Stenbit, a member of the NAE, has an extensive background in missile and space systems, commu-

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Page 178 nication systems and networks for military systems, and computer networking and communications. His interests have focused on system engineering problems in which boundary conditions are variable and have nonlinear distortions caused by regulation, treaty, or perhaps technological change, such as those associated with strategic offensive and defensive missiles in the face of arms control treaties. Mr. Stenbit has served on numerous government and scientific advisory boards. Robert F. Stengel is professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering and director of the Laboratory for Control and Automation at Princeton University. His current research focuses on failure-tolerant and robust control, intelligent systems, and the coordinated flight of uninhabited air vehicles. At Princeton, Dr. Stengel was director of the Flight Research Laboratory, where he conducted pioneering experimental research on digital flight control systems, flight computer networking via fiber optics, aircraft flying qualities, and aerodynamic system identification. Before coming to Princeton, Dr. Stengel held positions with the Analytic Sciences Corporation, the Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, the U.S. Air Force, and NASA. He is a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics and of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. He received the AIAA Mechanics and Control of Flight Award in 2000. Edward J. Wegman is professor and director of the Center for Computational Statistics at George Mason University (GMU). Dr. Wegman came to GMU with an extensive background in both theoretical statistics and computing technology. His early career was spent as an assistant professor at the University of North Carolina's Department of Statistics and as head of the Mathematical Sciences Division at the Office of Naval Research. Additionally, Dr. Wegman was the original program director of the basic research program in ultrahigh-speed computing at the Strategic Defense Initiative Innovative Science and Technology Program Office (Star Wars Program). Dr. Wegman is a fellow of the American Statistical Association, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Institute of Mathematical Statistics. He has served on numerous government and scientific advisory boards and is currently a member of the NRC's Panel on Survivability and Lethality Analysis. Stephen D. Weiner is a senior staff member in the Systems and Analysis Group at the Lincoln Laboratory of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Dr. Weiner's background in ballistic missile defense includes system and radar design, sensor tracking and discrimination measurements, and interceptor guidance. His research interests also include defense against both theater and strategic cruise missiles. Dr. Weiner has served on a number of government and scientific advisory panels, including a 1991 naval research advisory committee on naval theater ballistic missile defense.