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Appendixes



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Page 45 Appendixes

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Page 47 APPENDIX A PANEL AND STAFF BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION Enriqueta C. Bond (Cochair) received her undergraduate degree in zoology and physiology from Wellesley College, a master's degree in biology and genetics from the University of Virginia, and a PhD in molecular biology and biochemical genetics from Georgetown University. She is a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Society for Microbiology, the American Public Health Association, and the Institute of Medicine (IOM). Dr. Bond was IOM's executive officer from 1989 to 1994. She became President of the Burroughs Wellcome Fund in July 1994. She serves on the IOM Council, chairs the Board of the North Carolina Biotechnology Center, the Board of Scientific Counselors of the National Centers for Infectious Diseases, and co-chairs the IOM Clinical Research Roundtable. Alan Schriesheim (Cochair) is director emeritus of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). He also served as senior department director, COO, director, and CEO of ANL. Previously, he worked at Exxon Research and Engineering Co. in a variety of positions, including general manager of the Technology Department, assistant manager, assistant director, and director of corporate research laboratories. Dr. Schriesheim has been honored with the Award in Petroleum Chemistry by the American Chemical Society and the Karcher Silver Medallist Lecturer. He has served on many national and international boards and committees. Most recently, he served as a member of the National Academy of Engineering's selection

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Page 48 committee for determining the Greatest Engineering Achievements of the 20th century. Dr. Schriesheim is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He is a fellow of the New York Academy of Sciences and the American Institute of Chemists and a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Chemical Society, and Sigma Xi. Dr. Schriesheim received his PhD in physical organic chemistry from Pennsylvania State University. John E. Halver is professor emeritus in nutrition at the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences at the University of Washington. He was a laboratory director at the US Fish and Wildlife Service for 25 years and senior scientist for the US Department of Interior (1975-1978). Concurrently, he served as a research officer in the US Army Medical Research and Nutrition Laboratories for 30 years. As president of Halver Corporation, an ecosystem management consulting company, he has been retained by the World Bank, the United Nations Development Program, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, the US Agency for International Development, and several other agencies for technology-transfer projects in over 30 countries. He has published over 185 peer-reviewed articles and edited seven books during his research activities (1950-2000) and has been chair or member of several National Research Council committees. His professional memberships include the American Institute of Fisheries Research Biologists (Fellow), the American Institute of Nutrition (Fellow), the American Fisheries Society (Certified Scientist), Society of Experimental Biology and Medicine, World Aquaculture Society, and the American Chemical Society (Senior Grade). Dr. Halver was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1978, the Hungarian Academy of Sciences in 1998, and the National Fish Culture Hall of Fame in 2000. He received his PhD in biochemistry from the University of Washington.

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Page 49 Brigid L.M. Hogan is a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator and Hortense B. Ingram Professor in the Department of Cell Biology at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. Before joining Vanderbilt, she was head of the Laboratory of Molecular Embryology, first at the Imperial Cancer Research Fund and then at the National Institute of Medical Research in London. Dr. Hogan is a member of the National Academies Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy. She is also a member of the Institute of Medicine and the European Molecular Biology Organization. Dr. Hogan received her PhD in biochemistry from Cambridge University, England. Wesley T. Huntress, Jr. is the director of the Carnegie Institution's Geophysical Laboratory. He was associate administrator for space science at National Aeronautics and Space Administration Headquarters from 1993 to 1998 and director of the Solar System Exploration Division from 1990 to 1992. Before joining the Senior Executive Service, Dr. Huntress had been detailed from the California Institute of Technology's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for 2 years as special assistant to the director of the Earth Science and Applications Division. Dr. Huntress began his career at JPL in 1968, first as a National Research Council resident associate before joining JPL permanently. Dr. Huntress has over 100 peer-reviewed publications in astrochemistry. He is a member of the NRC Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences. His current professional memberships include the American Astronautical Society (past President), American Astronomical Society Division of Planetary Sciences (Vice Chair), and Vice President of the Planetary Society. Dr. Huntress received his PhD in chemical physics from Stanford University. Louis J. Lanzerotti is Distinguished Member of the technical staff of Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, where his research interests have included geophysics and space plasma physics as

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Page 50 related to planetary magnetospheres and atmospheres, energetic particles emitted by the sun, and the engineering impacts of natural and artificial space phenomena on space and terrestrial technologies. Dr. Lanzerotti is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the International Academy of Astronautics, the author or co-author of more than 500 papers, and co-author of three books. He is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, the American Geophysical Union, and the American Physical Society. He is a member of the Governing Board of the American Institute of Physics. He received the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Distinguished Public Service Medal in 1988 and 1994 and has both an Antarctic mountain and a “minor planet” named for him. Dr. Lanzerotti received his PhD in physics from Harvard University. Rudolph A. Marcus is Arthur Amos Noyes Professor of Chemistry at California Institute of Technology. He has been a member of several National Academies committees. Numerous awards—including the Nobel Prize in chemistry in 1992, the Wolf Prize in 1985, and the National Medal of Science in 1989—distinguish Dr. Marcus's career, in addition to various honorary doctorates and professorships. Dr. Marcus is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. He is a foreign or honorary member of many societies, including the American Chemical Society, the American Physical Society, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Philosophical Society, the Royal Society of London, the Royal Society of Canada, and the Chinese Academy of Sciences. Dr. Marcus received his PhD in physical chemistry from McGill University. Stuart A. Rice is the Frank P. Hixon Distinguished Service Professor at the University of Chicago's James Franck Institute. His research interests include elementary photophysical and photo-

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Page 51 chemical processes, quantum chaos, active control of selectivity of chemical reaction, reaction-rate theory, study of liquid surfaces, properties of supported monolayers, phase transitions in interfaces, and the equilibrium and dynamical properties of quasi-two-dimensional systems. Dr. Rice is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. He has served on many national and international boards and committees as editor, member, and consultant, including the National Science Board and National Academies' Board on Chemical Sciences and Technology. Dr. Rice is a 2000 recipient of the National Medal of Science. He received his PhD in chemistry from Harvard University. Herbert H. Richardson is Regents Professor and Distinguished Professor of Engineering, associate vice chancellor for engineering, and director of the Texas Transportation Institute at the Texas A&M University System. Before taking his position at Texas A&M, he was chief scientist at the US Department of Transportation and professor and associate dean of engineering at MIT. He has chaired and served on numerous National Academies committees examining transportation issues. Dr. Richardson is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. His professional memberships include the American Society of Engineering Educators, the New York Academy of Science, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Sigma Xi, and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. He received his ScD in mechanical engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Max D. Summers is a Distinguished Professor at Texas A&M with joint appointments in biology, biochemistry and biophysics, entomology and genetics. He is holder of the Chair in Agricultural Biotechnology; Houston Intellectual Property Association, 1999 Outstanding Inventor of the Year. He is the director of the Center for Advanced Invertebrate Molecular Sciences. Dr. Summers is a

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Page 52 member of the National Academy of Sciences and has participated in many National Academies activities. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology. His professional memberships also include the American Society for Microbiology, American Society for Virology (past president), American Association for the Advancement of Science, American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and the American Society for Cell Biology. Dr. Summers received his PhD in entomology from Purdue University. Morris Tanenbaum was the vice chairman of the Board and chief financial officer of AT&T from 1988 to 1991. He began his career at Bell Laboratories on the technical staff and held various positions at Western Electric Company, including vice president of the Engineering Division and vice president of Manufacturing, before returning to Bell Laboratories in 1975 as executive vice president. In 1978, he became president of New Jersey Bell Telephone Company; he returned to AT&T as executive vice president for corporate affairs and planning in 1980, becoming the first chairman and CEO of AT&T Communications in 1984. Dr. Tanenbaum is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He has chaired and served on numerous National Academies committees. He is a fellow at the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Physical Society, and the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, and a member of the American Chemical Society and the American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical, and Petroleum Engineers. Dr. Tanenbaum received his PhD in physical chemistry from Princeton University. Bailus Walker, Jr. is professor of environmental and occupational medicine at Howard University. Before his position at Howard, he was dean of the College of Public Health at the University of Oklahoma Health Science Center. Dr. Walker is a member of the Institute of Medicine. He has served on many National Academies committees and is a Fellow of the Royal

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Page 53 Society of Health and Distinguished Fellow of the American College of Epidemiology. Dr. Walker received his PhD in occupational and environmental health from the University of Minnesota. Robert M. White is University Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and director of the Data Storage Systems Center at the Carnegie Mellon University (CMU). His interests encompass technology and technology-policy issues. His policy interests are focused on federal science and technology policy. Before joining CMU, he served during the George H.W. Bush administration as the first undersecretary of commerce for technology. Dr. White was a principal scientist at Xerox's Palo Alto Research Center and chief technical officer of Control Data Corporation. His early career was spent in teaching and research. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He has participated in numerous activities of the National Academies. Dr. White's professional memberships include the American Physical Society, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He received his PhD in physics from Stanford University. Staff and Consultants: Deborah D. Stine is associate director of the Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy (COSEPUP). She has worked on various projects throughout the National Academies since 1989. She received a National Research Council group award for her first study for COSEPUP on policy implications of greenhouse warming and a Commission on Life Sciences staff citation for her work in risk assessment and management. Other studies have addressed graduate education, responsible conduct of research, careers in science and engineering, environmental remediation, the National Biological Survey, and corporate environmental stewardship. She holds a bachelor's degree in mechanical and environmental engineering from the University of California, Irvine; a master's

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Page 54 degree in business administration; and a PhD in public administration, specializing in policy analysis, from the American University. Before coming to the National Academies, she was a mathematician for the US Air Force, an air-pollution engineer for the state of Texas, and an air-issues manager for the Chemical Manufacturers Association. Alan H. Anderson is a consultant writer for the Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy (COSEPUP), has worked on a number of recent reports, including Science, Technology, and the Federal Government: National Goals for a New Era; Reshaping the Graduate Education of Scientists and Engineers; Capitalizing on Investments in Science and Technology; Evaluating Federal Research Programs: Research and the Government Performance and Results Act; and guides for students and faculty on careers in science and engineering and on mentoring students in science and engineering. He also writes for the Institute for Advanced Study and other clients. He has been a science writer for Time magazine and other publications. He holds a master's degree from the Columbia University School of Journalism and a BA in English from Yale University. Susan E. Cozzens is professor and chair of the School of Public Policy at the Georgia Institute of Technology. She spent 11 years on the faculty of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. From 1995 through 1997, Dr. Cozzens was director of the Office of Policy Support at the National Science Foundation (NSF). The office coordinated policy and management initiatives for the NSF director, primarily in peer review, strategic planning, and assessment. She has been an invited speaker, nationally and internationally, on science policy and research evaluation. She has served as a consultant to many organizations in both private and government sectors, including the National Academies Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy; the Institute of Medicine; the Office of Science and Technology Policy; NSF; the General Accounting

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Page 55 Office; and the Department of Health and Human Services. Dr. Cozzens has a distinguished record of publication and service in science policy and science and technology studies. Her PhD is in sociology from Columbia University (1985), and her bachelor's degree from Michigan State University (1972, summa cum laude). She is a recipient of Rensselaer's Early Career Award, a member of Phi Beta Kappa and Phi Kappa Phi, and a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. David M. Hart is associate professor of public policy, Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University. His research interests are at the intersection of American political development, political economy, and science and technology policy. His book, Forged Consensus: Science, Technology, and Economic Policy in the United States, 1921-1953, was published by Princeton University Press in 1998. His current research focuses on the politics of high-technology businesses and on new approaches to civilian technology policy. He has also written on the organization of the executive office of the president, genetic discrimination, environmental policy, and the “foreign policies” of US research universities. He serves as faculty chair for the political advocacy methodological area of concentration. He is a member of the Whitehead Institute Task Force on Genetic Testing, Privacy, and Public Policy; a member of the Academic Advisory Board, Center on Science, Policy and Outcomes; and a member of the Master's in Public Policy Admissions Committee. His PhD is in political science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and his bachelor's degree is from Wesleyan University.

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