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Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

F. Thomas Juster (Chair) is professor emeritus of economics at the University of Michigan, and a fellow of the American Statistical Association and of the National Association of Business Economists. He was director of the University of Michigan Institute for Social Research (ISR) from 1976 to 1986 and is currently a research scientist at ISR. He spent most of his prior professional career in New York with the National Bureau of Economic Research. He has chaired the Committee on the Quality of Economic Statistics of the American Economics Association, been a member of several committees of the National Academy of Sciences, served on the Brookings Panel as a senior advisor, and been a member of various advisory committees of the American Statistical Association. Dr. Juster's research interests include savings and wealth accumulation among U.S. households; time allocation within households; the determinants of retirement; and the interrelationships among health status, labor force status, and economic status.

Richard Blundell is professor of economics at University College, London, and also holds appointments as research director of the Institute for Fiscal Studies and research director of the ESRC Centre for Micro-Economics Analysis of Fiscal Policy. He has held visiting professor positions at the University of British Columbia, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the University of California at Berkeley. He was elected fellow of the Econometric Society in 1991 and fellow of the British Academy in 1996. In 1995 he was awarded the Jahnsson Prize for his work in



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Page 289 Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff F. Thomas Juster (Chair) is professor emeritus of economics at the University of Michigan, and a fellow of the American Statistical Association and of the National Association of Business Economists. He was director of the University of Michigan Institute for Social Research (ISR) from 1976 to 1986 and is currently a research scientist at ISR. He spent most of his prior professional career in New York with the National Bureau of Economic Research. He has chaired the Committee on the Quality of Economic Statistics of the American Economics Association, been a member of several committees of the National Academy of Sciences, served on the Brookings Panel as a senior advisor, and been a member of various advisory committees of the American Statistical Association. Dr. Juster's research interests include savings and wealth accumulation among U.S. households; time allocation within households; the determinants of retirement; and the interrelationships among health status, labor force status, and economic status. Richard Blundell is professor of economics at University College, London, and also holds appointments as research director of the Institute for Fiscal Studies and research director of the ESRC Centre for Micro-Economics Analysis of Fiscal Policy. He has held visiting professor positions at the University of British Columbia, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the University of California at Berkeley. He was elected fellow of the Econometric Society in 1991 and fellow of the British Academy in 1996. In 1995 he was awarded the Jahnsson Prize for his work in

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Page 290microeconometrics, labor supply, and consumer behavior. Dr. Blundell was editor of the Journal of Econometrics from 1992 to 1997, and in 1997 became coeditor of Econometrica. His published papers have appeared in Econometrica, Review of Economic Studies, American Economic Review, Journal of Econometrics, Journal of Applied Econometrics, and Economic Journal. Richard V. Burkhauser, an economist, is Sarah Gibson Blandings Professor and chair of the Department of Policy Analysis and Management at Cornell University. He has published widely in the area of U.S. and European social policy. He is on the editorial boards of The Gerontologist, The Journal of Disability Policy Studies, The Review of Income and Wealth, and Labour Economics. Dr. Burkhauser is also a member of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics board of overseers. He is currently editing a special issue of Labour Economics on the Health, Wealth, and Work of Older Persons using international dynamic data. Dr. Burkhauser received his Ph.D. in economics from the University of Chicago. Graziella Caselli is professor of demography and director of the Dipartimento di Scienze Demografiche at the University of Rome “La Sapienza.” She also is honorary president of the European Association for Population Studies. Dr. Caselli has written extensively on the demography of Italy, health and mortality transitions in Europe, and health and mortality among elderly populations. Linda P. Fried is professor of internal medicine at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, with a joint appointment in epidemiology in the Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health. Her research concerns the development of preventive health care for older adults. She is principal investigator of the Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS) and of the Women's Health and Aging Studies (WHAS I and II). These studies focus on the risk factors for cardiovascular diseases and atherosclerosis in men and women aged 65 and older (CHS) and on defining the roles of major chronic diseases in causing physical disability and frailty in older adults (WHAS I and II). Dr. Fried also is research director of a multicenter initiative to evaluate the import of enhanced activity through productive social roles on health promotion in older adults, and the director of a training grant on the epidemiology and biostatistics of aging. Albert I. Hermalin is professor emeritus of sociology and research scientist at the Population Studies Center, University of Michigan. He has served as chair of the Committee on Population of the National Academy of Sciences and as president of the Population Association of America. He currently is working on a comparative study of aging in Asia, a

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Page 291multiyear collaborative project with the Philippines, Taiwan, Thailand, and Singapore. The focus of the study is on the rapid social, economic, and demographic changes under way and their impact on the health and socioeconomic well-being of the elderly, as well as on intergenerational relations more broadly. Robert L. Kahn is professor emeritus of psychology and public health at the University of Michigan, where he is also a research scientist emeritus in the Institute for Social Research, of which he was a founder. His research has concentrated for many years on two main subjects: organizational behavior and aging. His books and articles on organizations have analyzed their overall effectiveness, their impact on the health of their members, and their relevance for international relations. Dr. Kahn is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and numerous professional organizations. Arie Kapteyn is professor of econometrics and director of CentER at Tilburg University, the Netherlands. He is the author of more than 100 scientific papers on applied welfare economics, preference formation, household decision making, leisure and labor supply, econometrics of panel data, latent variables, variance components, consumer demand, and savings. Dr. Kapteyn's recent papers have appeared in the American Economic Review, the Journal of Public Economics, De Economist, and Labour Economics. Kevin Kinsella is a Special Assistant with the International Programs Center, Population Division, U.S. Census Bureau, where he has been employed since 1979. During the period 1999-2001, he worked with the Committee on Population of the National Research Council as Study Director for this panel report as well as another project that assessed the pros and cons of collecting biological indicators in population-based surveys. Prior to his assignment with the National Research Council, Kinsella was Chief of the Census Bureau's Aging Studies Branch. His professional activities have focused on the role of women in development, population projections for developing countries (particularly in Latin America), and the demography of aging internationally. Michael Marmot is professor of epidemiology and public health at University College, London (UCL). He is best known as the principal investigator of the Whitehall II Study on socioeconomic differences in health and disease among British civil servants. He became director of the International Centre for Health and Society at UCL in 1994, was ap

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Page 292pointed a member of the Royal Commission on Environmental Pollution, and awarded an MRC Professorship in 1995. Dr. Marmot was elected fellow of the Royal College of Physicians in 1996 and fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences in 1998, and was knighted by the Queen in 2000 in recognition of his broad-ranging contributions to the fields of epidemiology and public health. Linda G. Martin has been president of the Population Council in New York since 1999. Previously, she was RAND's vice president for research development, and from 1993 to 1995 was vice president and director of RAND's Domestic Research Division, which conducted research on health, education, labor and population, and criminal and civil justice. Prior to joining RAND, Dr. Martin held positions at the National Research Council, the East-West Center, the University of Hawaii, and the U.S. House of Representatives. Her past research has focused on demographic change in Asia and Africa, and she has published extensively on aging issues. Currently she is working on trends in disability in the United States. Dr. Martin received an A.B. in mathematics from Harvard University and an M.P.A. and Ph.D. in economics from Princeton University. David Mechanic is René Dubos Professor of Behavioral Sciences and director of the Institute for Health at Rutgers University, where he was formerly dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences. He also directs the Institute's Center for Research on the Organization and Financing of Services for the Severely Mentally Ill and a postdoctoral training program in mental health services research funded by the National Institute on Mental Health. He is the author of numerous books and other publications on health policy and health services research. His current research interests include trust relationships between clients and physicians, the effects of managed care on mental health services, and patterns of inpatient treatment for patients with schizophrenia. Dr. Mechanic is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and its affiliate, the Institute of Medicine, and has served on many national commissions and advisory boards. He is a recipient of the Distinguished Investigator Award from the Association for Health Services Research; the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Mental Health Section of the American Sociological Association; the Carl Taube Award for Mental Health Services Research from the American Public Health Association; and the Health Services Research Prize awarded by the Association of University Programs in Health Administration and the Baxter Allegiance Foundation, the highest honor in the health services research field.

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Page 293 James P. Smith holds the RAND chair in Labor Markets and Demographic Studies and was the director of RAND's Labor and Population Studies Program from 1977 to 1994. He has directed numerous projects and written extensively in the areas of immigration, the economics of aging, black-white wages and employment in the United States, the effects of economic development on labor markets, wealth accumulation and savings behavior, and the interrelationships between health and economic status among the elderly. He chaired the National Institute on Aging's (NIA) Ad Hoc Advisory Panel on Extramural Priorities for Data Collection in Health and Retirement Economics, and currently serves on NIA's Data Monitoring Committee for both the Health and Retirement Survey and the Asset and Health Dynamics Among the Oldest-Old Survey. He is a member of the National Science Foundation Advisory Committee for the Panel Study of Income Dynamics and is the public representative of California's Occupational Safety and Health Board, appointed by the governor. He has received the National Institutes of Health (NIH) MERIT Award, the most distinguished honor granted to a researcher by NIH. Dr. Smith received his Ph.D. in economics in 1972 from the University of Chicago. Beth J. Soldo is the Joseph E. and Ruth E. Boettner Professor of Financial Gerontology and director of the Boettner Center at the University of Pennsylvania School of Social Work. Previously, she was professor of demography at Georgetown University. She has done extensive research on various aspects of aging, including family structure, social support, mobility, intergenerational transfers, and health dynamics of the oldest old. She is a collaborator on two national surveys of the elderly: the Health and Retirement Survey and the Survey of Asset and Health Dynamics Among the Oldest Old. Dr. Soldo received her B.A. in sociology from Fordham University and her M.A. and Ph.D. in sociology from Duke University. Robert Wallace is professor of preventive medicine and internal medicine at the University of Iowa College of Medicine. He has been a member of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) and the National Advisory Council on Aging of the National Institutes of Health. He currently is a member of the Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Board of the Institute of Medicine and a senior advisor to USPSTF. Dr. Wallace's research focuses on the causes and prevention of disability among older persons in the United States and internationally. He has substantial experience in the conduct of both observational cohort studies of older persons and clinical trials, including preventive interventions related to osteoporotic fracture and coronary disease prevention. He is

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Page 294the site principal investigator for the U.S. Women's Health Initiative (WHI), a national intervention trial exploring the prevention of breast and colon cancer and coronary disease, and is the deputy chair of WHI's Executive Committee. Robert J. Willis, a professor of economics, joined the University of Michigan in 1995 and holds joint appointments with the Survey Research Center at the Institute for Social Research and the Population Studies Center. Before coming to Michigan, Dr. Willis held appointments at the University of Chicago, the State University of New York at Stony Brook, and Stanford University. He has been elected to the Board of Directors of the Population Association of America; has served on advisory boards for a number of surveys, including the Panel Study of Income Dynamics, the High School and Beyond Survey, and the Health and Retirement Survey; and was recently appointed as representative to the Census Advisory Board by the American Economic Association. Dr. Willis received his Ph.D. from the University of Washington in 1971. David Wise is John F. Stambaugh Professor of Political Economy at the John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, and the director for Health and Retirement Programs at the National Bureau of Economic Research. He has written extensively on individual savings, pensions, and assets in later life, and has authored or edited numerous books and papers on the economics of aging. Dr. Wise recently finished a multiyear 11-country collaborative study of social security programs and retirement around the world. Zeng Yi currently is senior research scientist at the Center for Demographic Studies of Duke University, with joint appointments as professor of demography at the Institute of Population Research, Peking University, and as distinguished research scholar at the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostok, Germany. Previously, he was director of the Institute of Population Research at Peking University. His primary research fields are population aging and family household dynamics. Dr. Zeng has authored or edited nine books and nearly 100 professional papers, about half of which are in English and published in academic journals or series in the United States, England, the Netherlands, Belgium, Austria, Denmark, and Italy. He received his Ph.D. from Brussels Free University in 1986 and conducted postdoctoral research at Princeton University.