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APPENDIX B:

WORKSHOP SPEAKER BIOSKETCHES

Michael Agar received his Ph.D. in linguistic anthropology from the Language-Behavior Research Laboratory at the University of California, Berkeley. An NIH Career Award recipient, he is now professor emeritus at the University of Maryland, College Park, with adjunct appointments in Speech Communication and Comparative Literature, as well as at the International Institute for Qualitative Research at the University of Alberta. He works independently with Ethknoworks in Takoma Park, Maryland. Ethknoworks focuses on issues of language, culture, communication and ethnographic research, with applications in fields as diverse as business, public health, conflict resolution, museums, and second language instruction. His past appointments include research positions with public health agencies as well as university positions at the Universities of Hawaii, Houston, and California in the United States, and visits with the Universities of Mysore in India, Surrey in the United Kingdom, and Vienna and the Johannes Kepler University in Austria. His publications include articles in journals from the fields of anthropology, linguistics, folklore and oral history, sociology, psychology, psychiatry, public policy, artificial intelligence, intercultural communication, and the substance use and transportation fields. He also writes for general magazines like The Smithsonian. Among his books are Ripping and Running, The Professional Stranger, Angel Dust, Speaking of Ethnography, Independents Declared, and Language Shock: Understanding the Culture of Conversation.

Norman M. Bradburn was appointed Assistant Director of the Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences Directorate at the National Science Foundation on March 13, 2000. He is the former Senior Vice President for Research and Director of the National Opinion Research Center, was the Tiffany and Margaret Blake Distinguished Service Professor at the University of Chicago and was a member of the Department of Psychology and also the Harris Graduate School of Public Policy Studies. He served as Provost of the University of Chicago from 1984-1989. His research interests are anchored in social psychology, statistics, and survey methodology. A member of the Committee on National Statistics of the NRC from 1987-1988, Norman Bradburn served as chair of the committee from 1993-1998. From 1992-1994 he was chair of the Panel to Evaluate Alternative Census Methods for Census 2000 and Beyond, another committee of the NRC. During 1988 to 1992, he chaired the NRC's Board on International Comparative Studies in Education. A survey methodologist, Norman Bradburn is past president of the American Association of Public Opinion Research. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and is a fellow of the American Statistical Association. He has written extensively on cognitive aspects of survey response, asking sensitive questions, and recall errors in surveys. He is the author, with Seymour Sudman, of several books on survey methodology. In 1995, with co-authors Seymour Sudman and Norbert Schwarz, he published his sixth book, Thinking About Answers: The Application of Cognitive Processes to Survey Methodology.

Glen Cain is Emeritus Professor of the economics department and a research associate of the Institute for Research on Poverty at the University of Wisconsin. His field is labor economics, and his current research is on Wisconsin's welfare program, on the relation between the macro-economic performance of the United States economy and poverty, and on



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Page 20 APPENDIX B: WORKSHOP SPEAKER BIOSKETCHES Michael Agar received his Ph.D. in linguistic anthropology from the Language-Behavior Research Laboratory at the University of California, Berkeley. An NIH Career Award recipient, he is now professor emeritus at the University of Maryland, College Park, with adjunct appointments in Speech Communication and Comparative Literature, as well as at the International Institute for Qualitative Research at the University of Alberta. He works independently with Ethknoworks in Takoma Park, Maryland. Ethknoworks focuses on issues of language, culture, communication and ethnographic research, with applications in fields as diverse as business, public health, conflict resolution, museums, and second language instruction. His past appointments include research positions with public health agencies as well as university positions at the Universities of Hawaii, Houston, and California in the United States, and visits with the Universities of Mysore in India, Surrey in the United Kingdom, and Vienna and the Johannes Kepler University in Austria. His publications include articles in journals from the fields of anthropology, linguistics, folklore and oral history, sociology, psychology, psychiatry, public policy, artificial intelligence, intercultural communication, and the substance use and transportation fields. He also writes for general magazines like The Smithsonian. Among his books are Ripping and Running, The Professional Stranger, Angel Dust, Speaking of Ethnography, Independents Declared, and Language Shock: Understanding the Culture of Conversation. Norman M. Bradburn was appointed Assistant Director of the Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences Directorate at the National Science Foundation on March 13, 2000. He is the former Senior Vice President for Research and Director of the National Opinion Research Center, was the Tiffany and Margaret Blake Distinguished Service Professor at the University of Chicago and was a member of the Department of Psychology and also the Harris Graduate School of Public Policy Studies. He served as Provost of the University of Chicago from 1984-1989. His research interests are anchored in social psychology, statistics, and survey methodology. A member of the Committee on National Statistics of the NRC from 1987-1988, Norman Bradburn served as chair of the committee from 1993-1998. From 1992-1994 he was chair of the Panel to Evaluate Alternative Census Methods for Census 2000 and Beyond, another committee of the NRC. During 1988 to 1992, he chaired the NRC's Board on International Comparative Studies in Education. A survey methodologist, Norman Bradburn is past president of the American Association of Public Opinion Research. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and is a fellow of the American Statistical Association. He has written extensively on cognitive aspects of survey response, asking sensitive questions, and recall errors in surveys. He is the author, with Seymour Sudman, of several books on survey methodology. In 1995, with co-authors Seymour Sudman and Norbert Schwarz, he published his sixth book, Thinking About Answers: The Application of Cognitive Processes to Survey Methodology. Glen Cain is Emeritus Professor of the economics department and a research associate of the Institute for Research on Poverty at the University of Wisconsin. His field is labor economics, and his current research is on Wisconsin's welfare program, on the relation between the macro-economic performance of the United States economy and poverty, and on

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Page 21 long-run trends in time spent at work and the composition of the labor force in the United States. He has participated in the analysis of controlled field experiments in income-maintenance programs and has conducted evaluation studies and written on evaluation methods of non-experimental training and educational programs. His B.A. is from Lake Forest College (1955), M.A. from the University of California at Berkeley (1957) and Ph.D. from the University of Chicago (1964). Susan Chipman manages the Cognitive Science program at the U.S. Office of Naval Research, as well as more applied programs in advanced training technology. Previously, she was Assistant Director of the National Institute of Education, where she was responsible for managing research programs in mathematics education, cognitive development, computers and education, and social influences on learning and development. For a number of years, she served as an advisor to the James S. McDonnell Foundation's education research program. Prior to becoming a research manager, her personal research focused on visual pattern perception and its development, and she has also written extensively on the participation of women and minorities in mathematics, science and technology. Books she has edited are Thinking and Learning Skills, Women and Mathematics: Balancing the Equation, Knowledge Acquisition, Cognitively Diagnostic Assessment and Cognitive Task Analysis. She received an AB in Mathematics, MBA, and AM and Ph.D. in Experimental Psychology from Harvard University and is a Fellow of both the American Psychological Association and the American Psychological Society. Christopher T. Cross is President and Chief Executive Officer of the Council for Basic Education (CBE). The Council, established in 1956, is an independent critical voice for education reform, advocating a curriculum strong in the liberal arts for all children in the nation's public elementary and secondary schools. Before joining CBE, Mr. Cross served as Director of the Education Initiative of The Business Roundtable and as Assistant Secretary for Educational Research and Improvement, U.S. Department of Education. Mr. Cross chairs an NRC Panel on Minority Representation in Special Education and the National Council for Education and Human Development at George Washington University. He chairs the board of the Center for Education Policy and is a member of the board of directors of the American Institutes for Research. He serves on the board of trustees of Whittier College; the board of visitors of the College of Education, University of Maryland; the Danforth Foundation's Policymakers' Program Advisory Board; and the Board of International Comparative Studies in Education for the NRC. From 1994-1997, Mr. Cross served as president of the Maryland State Board of Education. He was a member of the National Education Commission on Time and Learning. He has written extensively in the education and public policy areas and has been published in numerous scholarly and technical publications, including Education Week, Kappan, The College Board Review, The American School Board Journal, The Washington Post, The Baltimore Sun, and the Los Angeles Times. Michael J. Feuer is the Director of the Center for Education at the NRC. He was formerly the Director of the Board on Testing and Assessment in the NRC's Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Before joining the NRC, Dr. Feuer served as senior analyst and study director at the Office of Technology Assessment (OTA), where he worked on a variety of education and human resources projects, including educational

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Page 22 technology, vocational education, performance standards, and educational testing. He holds a Ph.D. in Public Policy from the University of Pennsylvania, where his research focused on mathematical modeling and human resource planning in organizations. He went on to a faculty position at Drexel University, where he taught courses in economics, public policy, and technology management. While at Drexel he published a series of articles on the economics of firm-sponsored education and training, which suggested variations to conventional human capital theory. Though granted early tenure at Drexel, he chose to move to Washington in 1986 to work at OTA on the interaction between social and cognitive sciences and education, training, and human capital. Larry V. Hedges is the Stella M. Rowley Professor of Education, Psychology, Public Policy Studies, and Sociology at the University of Chicago. His primary research interests are the application of statistical methods to problems in education, the social sciences, and policy studies, particularly the combination of results of replicated empirical research studies (meta-analysis), statistical models in cognitive science, and educational and psychological measurement. He has served as chairman of the Department of Education at the University of Chicago. He is Editor of the Journal of Educational and Behavioral Statistics and was Quantitative Methods Editor of Psychological Bulletin, and currently serves on the editorial boards of Psychological Methods, the American Journal of Sociology, and the Review of Educational Research. He is a member of the National Academy of Education, a Fellow of the American Statistical Association and the American Psychological Association, an elected member of the Society for Multivariate Experimental Psychology, and was a visiting fellow of the Russell Sage Foundation. He is currently a member of the U.S. Advisory Committee on Education Statistics and has served on numerous professional boards and panels including several National Research Council committees. His recent books include Statistical Methods for Meta-analysis (with Ingram Olkin) and The Handbook of Research Synthesis (with Harris Cooper). In addition, he has published numerous research articles in psychology, the social sciences, and statistics. Jeremy Kilpatrick is Regents Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of Georgia. Before joining the faculty at Georgia in 1975, he taught at Teachers College, Columbia University. He holds an A.B. and M.A. from the University of California at Berkeley, an M.S. and a Ph.D. from Stanford University, and an honorary doctorate from the University of Gothenburg in Sweden. In addition to receiving Fulbright awards for work in New Zealand, Spain, Colombia, and Sweden, he has taught courses in mathematics education at several European and Latin American universities. He was a charter member of the NRC's Mathematical Sciences Education Board and served two terms as Vice President of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction. A former editor of the Journal for Research in Mathematics Education, he recently co-edited a two-volume publication on mathematics education as a research domain. For the NRC, he chaired the Study Group on Guidelines for Mathematics Assessment and, more recently, the Mathematics Learning Study, whose report Adding It Up is being published by the National Academy Press. David Klahr received his B.S. from MIT in Electrical Engineering, and his Ph.D. from Carnegie Mellon's School of Industrial Administration in Organizations and Social Behavior. From 1967-1969, he was an Assistant Professor at the University of Chicago. He returned to

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Page 23 Carnegie Mellon in 1969, and became Professor of Psychology in 1976. He served as Department Head from 1983 to 1993. In addition to nearly 100 journal articles, Klahr is the author of two books: Cognitive Development: An Information Processing View (Erlbaum, 1976, with J. G. Wallace) and Exploring Science: The Cognition and Development of Discovery Processes (MIT Press, 2000) and editor or co-editor of four volumes: Cognition & Instruction (Erlbaum, 1976), Production System Models of Learning and Development (MIT Press, 1987, with P. Langley and R. Neches), Complex Information Processing: The impact of Herbert A. Simon (Erlbaum, 1989, with K. Kotovsky), and Cognition & Instruction: 25 Years of Progress (Erlbaum, 2001, with Sharon Carver). His recent research on the development of problem-solving and scientific reasoning skills is reported in Cognitive Psychology, Cognitive Science, Cognition & Instruction, and Child Development. Dr. Klahr is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association, a Charter Fellow of the American Psychological Society, a member of the Society for Research in Child Development, the Cognitive Science Society, and on the Governing Board of the Cognitive Development Society. He has served on the editorial boards of several cognitive science journals and on scientific review panels for the McDonnell Foundation, the NSF, and the NIH. He recently completed service on the NRC's Committee on the Foundations of Assessment. Sharon Lewis is the Director of Research for the Council of the Great City Schools. As director of research, Ms. Lewis is responsible for developing and maintaining a research program that articulates the status, needs, attributes, operation, and challenges of urban public schools and the children whom they serve. Mrs. Lewis previously served as assistant superintendent in the Department of Research, Development and Coordination for Detroit Public Schools where she was responsible for all testing, research, and evaluation conducted within the school district. Additionally, Mrs. Lewis is the former director of the Office of Research, Evaluation and Testing for Detroit Public Schools. Mrs. Lewis has served as an international educational consultant to the U.S. Department of Defense Dependents Schools, Germany Region, and was a State of Michigan delegate to the Soviet Union and the People's Republic of China. G. Reid Lyon is a research psychologist and the Chief of the Child Development and Behavior Branch within the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) at the NIH. He is responsible for the direction, development and management of research programs in developmental psychology, cognitive neuroscience, behavioral pediatrics, reading, and human learning and learning disorders. Before joining the NIH on a full-time basis in 1991, Dr. Lyon served on the faculties of Northwestern University (Communication Science and Disorders/ Neuroscience-1980-1983) and the University of Vermont (Neurology-1983-1991). He was a member of the Maternal and Child Health Scientific Peer Review Group at NICHD/NIH from 1987 to 1991. Dr. Lyon's research program was supported, in part, by grants from the NIH and the U.S. Department of Education. Dr. Lyon received his Ph.D. from the University of New Mexico (1978) with a dual concentration in psychology and developmental disabilities. He completed a Fellowship in developmental neuroscience at the University of New Mexico Medical Center. He has taught children with learning disabilities, served as a third grade classroom teacher, and served as a school psychologist for 12 years in the public schools. Dr. Lyon has authored, co-authored, and edited over 100 journal articles, books, and book chapters addressing learning differences and disabilities in children. He is currently responsible for translating

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Page 24 NIH scientific discoveries relevant to the health and education of children to the White House, the United States Congress, and other governmental agencies. He also currently serves as an advisor to President George W. Bush on child development and education research and policies. C. Kent McGuire is Senior Vice President at the Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation (MDRC). At MDRC he is dividing his time between developing and managing research projects focused on school reform and education policy and serving as the director of MDRC's Department on Education, Children and Youth. He most recently served as Assistant Secretary of Education, with responsibility for the Office of Education Research and Improvement. There he was responsible for managing a wide range of federal grants and contracts administered through eight different operating units within the agency. Previous positions include Education Program Officer at the Pew Charitable Trusts, Education Program Director at the Lilly Endowment, Inc and Senior Policy Analyst and Director of the School Finance Center at the Education Commission of the States. He received in Ph.D. in Public Administration in 1991 from the University of Colorado. Robert Mislevy is a Professor in the Department of Educational Measurement, Statistics, and Evaluation at the University of Maryland, College Park. Before coming to the University of Maryland, he was a Distinguished Research Scientist in the Division of Statistics and Psychometrics Research at Educational Testing Service. He earned his Ph.D. in Methodology of Behavioral Research at the University of Chicago in 1981. Dr. Mislevy's research centers on applying developments in statistical methodology and cognitive science to practical problems in educational and psychological measurement, and he has published some sixty papers, book chapters, and monographs on these topics. His work includes a multiple-imputation approach for integrating sampling and test-theoretic models in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), a Bayesian inference network for updating the student model in an intelligent tutoring system, and a framework for monitoring and improving portfolio assessment evaluation. He was awarded the American Educational Research Association's Raymond B. Cattell Early Career Award for Programmatic Research, and three times has received the National Council of Measurement in Education's Triennial Award for Technical Contributions to Educational Measurement. He has served as president of the Psychometric Society and as a member of National Research Council's committees on assessment instruction, and cognitive psychology. William Morrill is a Senior Fellow at Caliber Associates of Fairfax, VA. He received his B.A. from Wesleyan University and his M.P.A. from the Maxwell School, Syracuse University. After many years of Federal service including work at the Office of Management and Budget and as Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation at the Department of Health, Education and Welfare, he has been a researcher and institutional leader at two of the Mathematica companies. His recent work includes a study of the national educational research, development and dissemination system and a just completed evaluation of the Congressionally mandated expert panel process for selection of promising and exemplary educational programs, both done for the National Educational Research Policy and Priorities Board. He has substantial experience in the organization, planning and assessment of R&D programs and evaluation activities.

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Page 25 William Quinn is Senior Program Associate at the North Central Regional Educational Laboratory, Naperville, Illinois. He received his B.S. and M.Ed. from Brigham Young University, and Ed.D. from Western Michigan University. His work has focused extensively on conducting educational evaluations at the school, district, and state levels. He has conducted over 100 evaluation studies at the school, district, state, and national levels. He has had extensive experience evaluating technology use in public education, university, and private settings. Some of his recent evaluation studies include a four-year study of technology use in Indiana elementary schools and homes, an evaluation of Chicago school reform, an assessment of how well Iowa's preschool programs prepare children for kindergarten and evaluations of technology use for the state of Virginia and for the Miami-Dade School District. He has published research and evaluation reports on technology use in instruction, elementary literacy and math achievement, cost-effectiveness of training and professional development, assessment of year-round schooling, and teacher evaluation systems. Diane Ravitch is a distinguished visiting fellow at the Hoover Institution and a member of the Koret Task Force on K–12 Education. Ravitch is a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, where she holds the Brown Chair in Education Policy. Additionally, she is a research professor at New York University and a member of the board of the New America Foundation. Since 1997, Ravitch has been a member of the National Assessment Governing Board. She is also a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the National Academy of Education, and the Society of American Historians. During the Bush administration, Ravitch served as an assistant secretary for educational research and improvement and as a counselor to the U.S. Department of Education. She is a former professor of history and education at Columbia University's Teachers College and a former adviser to Poland's Ministry of Education. Ravitch is the editor of many publications, including the annual Brookings Papers on Education Policy. She edited The Schools We Deserve, Debating the Future of American Education, and The American Reader. She has many books to her credit including Left Back: A Century of Failed School Reforms; National Standards in American Education: A Citizen's Guide; What Do Our 17-Year Olds Know? (with Hoover Distinguished Visiting Fellow and Koret Task Force member Chester Finn Jr.); The Great School Wars: New York City, 1805–1973; and The Troubled Crusade: American Education, 1945–1980. Her publications have been translated into many languages. Her articles have appeared in the Wall Street Journal, the Washington Post, the New York Times, and the Brookings Review. Ravitch, a historian of education, has lectured on democracy and civic education throughout the world. Sally Rockey has spent her career in the area of research administration. She received her Ph.D. in Entomology (1985) from The Ohio State University and held a post doctoral appointment at the University of Wisconsin. In 1986 she joined the USDA Competitive Research Grants Office of Cooperative State Research Service (CSRS) as program director for two entomological programs. In 1991 she became Division Director for the Plants Division of the National Research Initiative Competitive Grants Program (NRI), CSRS, USDA. In 1996 she assumed her current position of Deputy Administrator for the Competitive Research Grants and Award Management Unit of the Cooperative State

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Page 26 Research, Education, and Extension Service (CSREES) which is the extramural research, education and education arm of the USDA. Dr. Rockey oversees the competitive portion of the research portfolio within CSREES as well as oversees the financial and administrative management of all CSREES grants and agreements. As research administration and science policy have been central to her career, Dr. Rockey has given over 100 presentations on agricultural research, grantsmanship, the competitive peer review process, and ethics in the Federal grants process. She is active on a number of Federal intergovernmental committees related to science and research and is the USDA representative to many science-related groups outside the Federal government. She actively participates in the science education of young children by giving presentations on insects to local elementary schools where she is known as the “Bug Doctor.” Steven M. Ross received his doctorate in educational psychology from the Pennsylvania State University. He a currently a professor and research director in the Center for Research in Educational Policy at the University of Memphis which he joined in 1974, and a noted lecturer on school programs and educational evaluation. Dr. Ross is the author of six textbooks and over 115 journal articles in the areas of at-risk learners, educational reform, educational technology, computer-based instruction, and individualized instruction. He is the editor of the research section of Educational Technology Research and Development and a member of the editorial board for two other professional journals. In the 1993, he was the first faculty recipient of the University of Memphis Eminent Faculty Award for teaching, research, and service. He recently testified on school restructuring research before the U.S. House of Representatives Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Youth, and Families, and was an invited panelist at Secretary of Education Riley's national town meeting on educational reform. Other recent work has been with value-added assessment in program evaluation, in collaboration with Dr. William Sanders. In 2001, Dr. Ross was appointed as the first recipient of the Lillian and Morrie Moss Chair of Excellence in Urban Education at the University of Memphis. Nancy Butler Songer is an Associate Professor of Science Education and Educational Technology, at the University of Michigan. She received her Ph.D. in Science Education, University of California at Berkeley. Professor Songer's field of expertise is explorations of the educational potential and realities of innovative technologies for reform-based science education in urban settings, elementary and middle school science, and the development of learning environments which are sensitive to diversity and gender issues. Recent awards include The Secretary's National Conference on Educational Technology 2000, Smithsonian Technology Award 2000, and National Science Foundation Presidential Faculty-Fellow 1995-2000. Judith Sunley is the interim Assistant Director for the Directorate for Education and Human Resources at the NSF. Prior to her appointment to this position in August 1999, Dr. Sunley served for five years as Assistant to the Director for Science Policy and Planning. In this capacity, she played a lead role in NSF's budgeting, planning, and program implementation. Dr. Sunley coordinated final stages in the development of NSF's 1995 strategic plan, NSF in a Changing World, and Foundation implementation of the 1993 Government Performance and Results Act. She served as co-chair of an interagency working group with the

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Page 27 Department of Education charged with developing an action strategy for using key federal resources to assist states and local school systems in improving student achievement in mathematics and science. She continued her involvement in education issues as part of the working group coordinating the Interagency Education Research Initiative, a partnership of NSF, the Department of Education, and the NIH. Dr. Sunley joined the National Science Foundation in 1980. Prior to serving as Assistant to the Director, she was the Executive Officer for Mathematics and Physical Sciences. She also served as Associate Program Director, Deputy Division Director, and Division Director in the Mathematical Sciences Division. Before coming to NSF, Dr. Sunley held positions as faculty member, Department Chair, and Associate Dean at American University. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Maryland and her M.S. and B.S. degrees from the University of Michigan, all in mathematics. Richard Suzman is the Associate Director for the Behavioral and Social Research Program at the National Institute on Aging (NIA), NIH. He has served previously as Chief of Demography and Population Epidemiology at NIA, where he developed and directed the program that funds research and training in demography, epidemiology, and the economics of aging. He is also Director of the Office of the Demography of Aging, the focal point for demographic statistics and research within NIA and across other Federal and international agencies. Dr. Suzman was Staff Director of the Federal Forum on Aging-Related Statistics, a coordinating organization made up of over 35 Federal agencies and jointly chaired by the National Center for Health Statistics, Bureau of the Census, and NIA. He was instrumental in developing the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) and its companion survey of Asset and Health Dynamics Among the Oldest-Old (AHEAD), as well as several other national longitudinal surveys on aging. Formerly on the faculty of the University of California, San Francisco, Medical School, Dr. Suzman has edited several volumes including, the Oldest Old and Forecasting the Health of Elderly Populations. After attending the University of the Witwatersrand, he received his undergraduate and graduate degrees from Harvard University, and a Diploma of Social Anthropology from Oxford University. He was a Post Doctoral Fellow at Stanford University, where he also served briefly on the faculty. Peter Tillers is Professor of Law at Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, Yeshiva University, and he is currently Senior Research Associate in Law at Yale Law School. He specializes in the law of evidence, the process of fact investigation, and the logic of inductive and abductive inference. He is a reviser of Wigmore's classic treatise on the law of evidence and he has published a variety of articles on evidence, inference, and investigation. He is former chairman and secretary of the evidence section of the Association of American Law Schools. He was a Fellow of Law and Humanities at Harvard University and a Senior Max Rheinstein Fellow at the University of Munich. He will be Visiting Professor of Law at Harvard Law School in the spring of 2002. Tillers' current research focuses on the possible uses of computer technology for marshalling evidence in dynamic forensic processes. Maris Vinovskis is the Bentley Professor of History, a Senior Research Scientist at the Center for Political Studies in the Institute for Social Research, and a member of the Faculty at the Gerald Ford School of Public Policy at the University of Michigan. He received his Ph.D. in American History from Harvard University and taught at the University of

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Page 28 Wisconsin from 1972-1974. He was been at the University of Michigan for 26 years and has served as a chair of the History Department. His areas of specialization in American history are demographic history, education history, family history, and policy history. Among the honors he has received are a Guggenheim Foundation fellowship as well as a Distinguished Faculty Award from the University of Michigan. He has been elected as the President of the History of Education Society as well as a member of the National Academy of Education. He has authored or co-authored eight books and edited or co-edited another eight volumes. His most recent book, History and Educational Policymaking was published by Yale University Press and he has a forthcoming book, Revitalizing Federal Education Research, which the University of Michigan Press will be publishing in 2001. Dr. Vinovskis has frequently worked with the federal government including serving as the Deputy Staff Director of the U.S. House Select Committee on Population (1978), consultant to the U.S. Office of Family Planning Programs (1983-1985), and consultant to the U.S. Office of Adolescent Pregnancy Programs (1981-1983). Vinovskis was the Research Adviser to the Assistant Secretary of OERI in both the Bush and Clinton administrations in 1992 and 1993 and then served as a consultant to OERI for two years. He was a member of the Independent Review Panel for the U.S. Department of Education and has testified several times in recent years before the House and Senate on federal education research and compensatory education policies.