Appendix A
Priority Lists of Chemicals

A master list of approximately 1,000 acutely toxic chemicals was initially compiled through the integration of individual priority lists of chemicals submitted by each U.S. federal agency placing a representative on the NAC/AEGL Committee. The master list was subsequently reviewed by individuals from certain state agencies and representatives from organizations in the private sector and modified as a result of comments and suggestions received. The various priority chemical lists were compiled separately by each federal agency based on their individual assessments of the hazards, potential exposure risk, and relevance of a chemical to their programmatic needs.

On May 21, 1997, a list of 85 chemicals was published in the Federal Register. This list identified those chemicals to be of highest priority across all U.S. federal agencies and represented the selection of chemicals for AEGL development by the NAC/AEGL Committee for the first 2–3 years of the program. The committee has now addressed most of these chemicals, and they are currently in the “proposed,” “interim,” or “final” stages of development. Certain chemicals did not contain an adequate database for AEGL development and, consequently, are on hold pending decisions regarding further toxicity testing. This initial “highest” priority list of 85 chemicals is shown in Table A-1.

A second “working list” of approximately 100 priority chemicals is being selected from the original master list or from new high-priority candidate chemicals submitted by U.S. agencies and organizations and by member coun-



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Standing Operating Procedures for Developing Acute Exposure Guideline Levels for Hazardous Chemicals Appendix A Priority Lists of Chemicals A master list of approximately 1,000 acutely toxic chemicals was initially compiled through the integration of individual priority lists of chemicals submitted by each U.S. federal agency placing a representative on the NAC/AEGL Committee. The master list was subsequently reviewed by individuals from certain state agencies and representatives from organizations in the private sector and modified as a result of comments and suggestions received. The various priority chemical lists were compiled separately by each federal agency based on their individual assessments of the hazards, potential exposure risk, and relevance of a chemical to their programmatic needs. On May 21, 1997, a list of 85 chemicals was published in the Federal Register. This list identified those chemicals to be of highest priority across all U.S. federal agencies and represented the selection of chemicals for AEGL development by the NAC/AEGL Committee for the first 2–3 years of the program. The committee has now addressed most of these chemicals, and they are currently in the “proposed,” “interim,” or “final” stages of development. Certain chemicals did not contain an adequate database for AEGL development and, consequently, are on hold pending decisions regarding further toxicity testing. This initial “highest” priority list of 85 chemicals is shown in Table A-1. A second “working list” of approximately 100 priority chemicals is being selected from the original master list or from new high-priority candidate chemicals submitted by U.S. agencies and organizations and by member coun-

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Standing Operating Procedures for Developing Acute Exposure Guideline Levels for Hazardous Chemicals tries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) that are planning to participate in the AEGL Program. Although “working lists” will be published in the Federal Register and elsewhere from time to time to indicate the NAC/AEGL Committee’s agenda, the priority of chemicals addressed, and, hence, the “working list,” is subject to modification if priorities of the NAC/AEGL Committee or individual stakeholder organizations, including international members, change during that period. INITIAL LIST OF 85 PRIORITY CHEMICALS FOR AEGL DEVELOPMENT Organization Lists Used to Compile the Master List and The Initial List of 85 Priority Chemicals1 ATSDR Medical Managment U.S. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry M=Chemicals with an ATSDR Medical Management Guideline T=Chemicals with an ATSDR Toxicology Profile DOD U.S. Department of Defense A=Army Toxicity Summary Chemical C=Chemical Weapons Convention Schedule 3. A Toxic Chemical Cs=Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP) Chemical 1   The initial list of 85 priority chemicals shown in Table A-1 has been created by identifying the highest priority hazardous chemicals from the Master List. This initial list is a starting point for the development of AEGL values by the National Advisory Committee for Acute Exposure Guideline Levels for Hazardous Chemicals (NAC/AEGL). However, the list of chemicals is subject to modification, pending changes in priorities recommended by the various stakeholders that make up the NACa/AEGL. While it is anticipated that most of these chemicals will remain as high priority for AEGL development, changes to the list could occur. The NAC/AEGL Committee hopes to select 30 to 40 chemicals per year to address in the AEGL development process. Consequently, the initial list will expand as the NAC/AEGL Committee continues to address chemicals of interest to its member organizations.

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Standing Operating Procedures for Developing Acute Exposure Guideline Levels for Hazardous Chemicals   I=Air Force Installation Restoration Program Chemical N=Navy Chemical S=Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) Chemical DOE SCAPA U.S. Department of Energy Subcommittee for Consequence Assessment and Protective Action Chemical DOT ERP U.S. Department of Transportation Emergency Response Guidebook P=Priority DOT ERG Chemical O=Other ERG Chemical EPA CAA 112b U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Clean Air Act 112b Chemical EPA CAA 112r U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Clean Air Act 112b Chemical (+=SARA s.302 also) EPA Superfund U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Superfund Chemical OSHA PSM U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration Process Safety Management Chemical OSHA STEL U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration Short-term Exposure Limit Chemical NIOSH IDLH NIOSH Immediately Dangerous to Life or Health Chemical Seveso Annex III International Seveso Convention List

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Standing Operating Procedures for Developing Acute Exposure Guideline Levels for Hazardous Chemicals TABLE A-1 Priority List of Chemicals CAS No. Chemical ATSDR DOD DOE SCAPA DOT ERG EPA CAA 112b EPA CAA 112r EPA Superfund OSHA PSM OSHA STEL NIOSH IDLH Seveso Annex III 56–23–5 Carbon tetrachloride T AIS     X   X     X   57–14–7 1,1-Dimethyl hydrazine   P X X+   X X 60–34–4 Methyl hydrazine P X X+ X X X 62–53–3 Aniline M   P X + X   X 67–66–3 Chloroform T AIS   X X+ X X 68–12–2 Dimethylformamide   X X   71–43–2 Benzene X AIS X X   X   71–55–6 1,1,1-Trichloroethane T X X X   X 74–90–8 Hydrogen cyanide M C   P X X+   X   X X 74–93–1 Methyl mercaptan T   P   X+   X X   75–09–2 Methylene chloride MT AIS X   X   X   75–21–8 Ethylene oxide MT   P X X+   X   X X 75–44–5 Phosgene M C   P X X+   X   X X 75–55–8 Propyleneimine   X X+   X X 75–56–9 Propylene oxide X X+ X X 75–74–1 Tetramethyllead X X+   X   X X 75–77–4 Trimethychlorosilane   X+   75–78–5 Dimethyldichlorosilane   X   X+   X   75–79–6 Methyltrichlorosilane   X+   X 78–82–0 Isobutyronitrile X+   79–01–6 Trichloroethylene MT AIS X   X   X  

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Standing Operating Procedures for Developing Acute Exposure Guideline Levels for Hazardous Chemicals 79–21–0 Peracetic acid   X+   X   X 79–22–1 Methy chloroformate X+   91–08–7 Toluene 2,6-diisocyanate M   X+ 106–89–8 Epichlorohydrin   X X+   X   107–02–8 Acrolein T   P X X+ X X X X X 107–11–9 Allyl amine   P   X+   X   X 107–12–0 Propionitrile   X+   107–15–3 Ethylenediamine X+   X   107–18–6 Allyl alcohol   P   X+   X X X 107–30–2 Chloromethyl methyl ether O X X+   X   X 108–23–6 Isopropyl chloroformate P   X+   108–88–3 Toluene MT AINS   X   X   108–91–8 Cyclohexylamine   X+   109–61–5 Propyl chloroformate   O   X+ 110–00–9 Furan   X+ X X   110–89–4 Piperidine X+   123–73–9 Crotonaldehyde, (E) X+   X   126–98–7 Methacrylonitrile   O   X+   X   127–18–4 Tetrachloroethylene T AIS X   X   X   151–56–4 Ethyleneimine   P X X+   X X X 302–01–2 Hydrazine T I X   X X+   X   353–42–4 Boron triflouride compound with methyl ether (1:1)   X+   X 506–77–7 Cyanogen chloride X+   X   509–14–8 Tetranitromethane X+   X

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Standing Operating Procedures for Developing Acute Exposure Guideline Levels for Hazardous Chemicals CAS No. Chemical ATSDR DOD DOE SCAPA DOT ERG EPA CAA 112b EPA CAA 112r EPA Superfund OSHA PSM OSHA STEL NIOSH IDLH Seveso Annex III 540–59–0 1,2-Dichloroethylene T   X   X   540–73–8 1,2-Dimethylhydrazine   P X X+   X   X 584–84–9 Toluene 2,4-diisocyanate M   X X+ X   X X 594–42–3 Perchloromethyl-mercaptan   X+   X   X X 624–83–9 Methyl isocyanate   P X X+   X   X X 811–97–2 HFC 134A (1,1,1,2- Tetrafluoroethane)   N   814–68–6 Acrylyl chloride   X+   X   1330–20–7 Xylenes (mixed) X AIN   X   X   1717–00–6 HCFC 141b (1,1-Dichloro-1-fluoroethane)   N   4170–30–3 Crotonaldehyde cis & trans mixture   P   X+   X   6423–43–4 Propylene glycol dinitrate (Otto Fuel II) T Navy   7446–09–5 Sulfur dioxide   P   X+   X X X X 7446–11–9 Sulfur trioxide P   X+   X   X 7647–01–0 Hydrogen chloride P X X+ X X X X X 7647–01–0 Hydrochloric acid P X X+ X X X X   7664–39–3 Hydrogen fluoride M   P X X+   X X X X 7664–41–7 Ammonia MT   X+ X X   X X 7664–93–9 Sulfuric acid   P   + X   X   7697–37–2 Nitric acid   X P   X+   X X X  

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Standing Operating Procedures for Developing Acute Exposure Guideline Levels for Hazardous Chemicals 7719–12–2 Phosphorus trichloride   P   X+   X X X   7726–95–6 Bromine P X+ X X X X 7782–41–4 Fluorine P X+ X   X   7782–50–5 Chlorine M   P X X+ X X X X X 7783–06–4 Hydrogen sulfide M   X X+   X   7783–60–0 Sulfur tetrafluoride   P   X+   7783–81–5 Uranium hexafluoride   X   7784–34–1 Arsenous trichloride   P   X+   7784–42–1 Arsine M   X P X X+ X X   X X 7790–91–2 Chlorine trifluoride   X O   X   X   7803–51–2 Phosphine M   X P X X+   X X X X 8014–95–7 Oleum   P   X+ X   10025–87–3 Phosphorus oxychloride O X+ X 10049–04–4 Chlorine dioxide   X X X X   10102–43–9 Nitric oxide P X+ X   X   10102–44–0 Nitrogen dioxide   X X X X   10294–34–5 Boron trichloride   P X+ X 13463–39–3 Nickel carbonyl P X X+ X X   X 13463–40–6 Iron, pentacarbonyl- P   X+ X X   19287–45–7 Diborane   X P   X+ X   X   25323–89–1 Trichloroethane T AS X   X   X   70892–10–3 Jet fuels (JP-5 and JP-8)   N   163702–07–6 Methyl nonafluorobutyl ether (HFE 7100 component) N 163702–08–7 Methyl nonafluorobutyl ether (HFE 7100 component) N

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