Appendix B
Policy Statements of Health Professional Organizations



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Confronting Chronic Neglect: The Education and Training of Health Professionals on Family Violence Appendix B Policy Statements of Health Professional Organizations

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Confronting Chronic Neglect: The Education and Training of Health Professionals on Family Violence Organization Name Policy Name, Source, and Date Established Key Points Related to Education and Training American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) AAFP Paper on Family Violence Among projects for the AAFP to consider are the following: * An ongoing education program for members on the recognition and treatment of violence, including distribution of the American Medical Association’s (AMA) guidelines for history taking around issues of violence and abuse. * Offering a series of continuing medical education courses for members to increase their skills in discussing this issue with patients. From “AAFP Paper on Family Violence” Developed by the 1994 Commission on Special Issues and Clinical Interests American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) The Role of the Pediatrician in Recognizing and Intervening on Behalf of Abused Women (RE9748) The AAP recognizes that family and intimate partner violence is harmful to children. The AAP recommends that: From web site * Residency training programs and continuing medical education (CME) program leaders incorporate education on family and intimate partner violence and its implications for child health into the curricula of pediatricians and pediatric emergency department physicians. June 1998 Oral and Dental Aspects of Child Abuse and Neglect (RE9920) Pediatric dentists and oral and maxillofacial surgeons, whose advanced education programs include a mandated child abuse curriculum, can provide valuable information and assistance to physicians about oral and dental aspects of child abuse and neglect. Pulled from web site (www.aap.org/policy/) August 1999   American Academy of Physician Assistants (AAPA) AAPA Policies The AAPA shall support the development of educational programs concerning early prevention, recognition, reporting, and treatment of child abuse.

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Confronting Chronic Neglect: The Education and Training of Health Professionals on Family Violence   PA programs are encouraged to include in their curricula techniques of violence prevention, assessment, and intervention that promote safety and protection for battered individuals.   Physician assistants are encouraged to be familiar with multidisciplinary educational resources and public health and safety efforts directed at pediatric and adolescent violence prevention. The AAPAbelieves that access and availability of reliable information in these areas can enhance the efforts of PAs to address the problem of violence as it relates to the pediatric and adolescent population. American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) Position Statement: Violence as a Public Health Problem AACN recommends that: * Faculty in schools of nursing should acknowledge their own assumptions about domestic violence and stay current in their knowledgeon the concomitant health problems. * Content relative to domestic violence across the lifespan and across settings should be included in all baccalaureate and higher degree programs in nursing. * If content is integrated or threaded throughout the curriculum, it is recommended that the faculty adopt a curriculum plan that specifies the location violence-related content along of with a plan for periodically tracking the implementation of this plan. * Students should have opportunities to practice in clinical settings where they have experiences related to screening, assessing, and/or caring for victims of violence. *High-quality materials related to domestic violence should be available for professional continuing education in formats compatible with nontraditional learners at times and places convenient to the practicing professional. From AACN Position Statement “Violence as a Public Health Problem” March 1999 Available at www.aacn.nche.edu/publications/positions/position.htm

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Confronting Chronic Neglect: The Education and Training of Health Professionals on Family Violence Organization Name Policy Name, Source, and Date Established Key Points Related to Education and Training American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) Domestic Violence: The Role of EMS Personnel * ACEP believes that training in the evaluation and management of victims of domestic violence should be incorporated into the initial and continuing education of emergency medical services personnel. This training should include the recognition of victims and their injuries, an understanding of the patterns of abuse and how this affects care, scene safety, preservation of evidence, and documentation requirements. From ACEP online (www.acep.org/policy/) Approved by the ACEP Board of Directors April 1995 Policy number 400279 Approved by the ACEP Board of Directors January 2000 ACEP recommends that: Emergency medical services, medical school, and emergency medicine residency curricula include training in recognition, assessment, and interventions in child abuse. American College of Surgeons (ACOS) {ST-32} Statement on Domestic Violence N/A From web site (www.facs:80/fellows_info/statements/) October 1999 Meeting American Dental Association (ADA) American Dental Association Policies Resolved, that the ADA expand existing efforts to educate dental professionals to recognize abuse and neglect beyond that of children alone, to include women, elders, people with developmental disabilities, the physically challenged, and any other person who might be the object of abuse or neglect and encourage training programs on how to report such abuse and neglect tot the proper authorities as required by state law, and be it further Resolved, that the ADA initiate a dialogue with other professional organizations, such as the American Medical Association Excerpt from the Principles of Ethics and Code of Professional Conduct Policy Statement—Expansion of ADA Efforts to Educate Dental Professionals in Recognizing and Reporting Abuse and Neglect (1996:683)

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Confronting Chronic Neglect: The Education and Training of Health Professionals on Family Violence   to ensure that all health care professionals are working toward the same goals, and be it further Resolved, that these actions will not diminish any existing programs and that the ADA seek out existing programs in the dental community to try to coordinate them on a national level. American Medical Association (AMA) Update on the AMA’s National Campaign Against Family Violence The AMA should provide educational and training opportunities for physicians in diagnosing, treating, and referring cases of abuse constituting family violence. H-515.977 Policy Finders American Medical Women’s Association (AMWA) AMWA Domestic Violence AMWA is developing an online continuing medical education course for health care providers, in an attempt to increase awareness of domestic violence, improve the diagnosis and treatment of victims of domestic violence, and provide physicians and other health care professionals with knowledge and understanding of key aspects of domestic violence. From web site (www.amwa-doc.org/Education/) American Nurses Association (ANA) Position Statement: Physical Violence Against Women The American Nurses Association supports: * Routine education of all nurses and health care providers in the skills necessary to prevent violence against women. * Inclusion of the topic of violence against women in all undergraduate nursing curricula. From web site (www.nursingworld.org/readroom/position/) Effective September 6, 1991. Originated by Council of Community Health Nurses, Congress of Nursing Practice. Adopted by ANA Board of Directors  

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Confronting Chronic Neglect: The Education and Training of Health Professionals on Family Violence Organization Name Policy Name, Source And Date Established Key Points Related to Education and Training American Psychological Association (APA) Public Interest Directorate • Front Matter for Including Information on Child Abuse and Neglect in the Undergraduate Curriculum • Front Matter for Including Information on Child Abuse and Neglect in the Graduate Curriculum The APA working group on Implications for Education and Training of Child Abuse and Neglect Issues encouraged the development for this guide. This publication is designed to facilitate the inclusion of child abuse and neglect material in existing classes and the development of courses that focus on child abuse and neglect. It consists of an outline of the topics that could be included in a comprehensive semester-long course on child abuse and neglect and a series of references to the literature and other educational materials for each topic. From web site (http://www.apa.org/pi/ugradfront.html) Written April 1996   Emergency Nurses Association (ENA) Position Statement ENA supports mandatory professional training, curriculum development, and continuing education for all health professionals on domestic violence. From web site (www.ena.org/services/posistate/data/domvio.html) Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) Standards Standard PE.1.8 • The hospital has objective criteria for identifying and assessing possible victims of abuse and neglect, and they are used throughout the organization. Staff are to be trained in the use of these criteria. • The criteria focus on observable evidence and not on allegation alone. They address at least the following situations: physical assault, rape or other sexual molestation, domestic abuse, and abuse or neglect of elders and children. JCAHO: Comprehensive Accreditation Manual for Hospitals, Update 3, 1997

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Confronting Chronic Neglect: The Education and Training of Health Professionals on Family Violence National Association of Orthopedic Nurses (NAON) Comments to the Institute of Medicine’s Committee on the Training Needs of Health Professionals to Respond to Family Violence Public Forum June 2000 NAON recommendations on education: Nurses must be educated to effectively deal with domestic violence victims including the elderly and disabled. • NAON recommends education on domestic violence as a requirement for license renewal for professional associations, such as state medical and state nurses associations. • NAON recommends health professional colleges develop curricula on domestic violence and elder abuse. • NAON recommends that a minimum 10-hour curriculum on domestic violence be developed for nursing schools nationwide. Policy Recommendations by the National Association of Orthopedic Nurses Regarding Health Professionals’ Screening, Detection, and Referral of Domestic Violence Victims National Association of Social Workers (NASW) Policy Statement for Family Violence * NASW encourages schools of social work to develop and implement curricula to prepare students adequately to meet the demands of mandated witnesses and work in the field of family violence. * NASW encourages the development of field experiences that reflect different approaches to assessment, treatment, and prevention in this field. * NASW promotes the development of in-service training and continuing education on all forms of family violence to increase the awareness and intervention strategies of social work practitioners. * NASW promotes the creation of interdisciplinary training, education, and comprehensive services to link and coordinate programs with health and protective services, the courts, schools, law enforcement agencies, the military, places of worship, workplace service providers, and social service systems for the effective treatment and prevention of family violence From “Social Work Speaks” Policy Statement approved by the NASW Delegate Assembly, Nov. 1987, and reconfirmed by the Delegate Assembly, Aug. 1993. The 1999 Delegate Assembly voted to refer this policy statement to the 2002 Delegate Assembly for revision.

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Confronting Chronic Neglect: The Education and Training of Health Professionals on Family Violence Organization Name Policy Name, Source And Date Established Key Points Related to Education and Training The American College of Nurse-Midwives (ACNM) Violence Against Women N/A From “Violence Against Women” (Ad Hoc Committee) Approved by the ACNM BOD in Nov. 1995, revised Aug. 1997