Appendix I
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

JOHN D. STOBO (Chair) is president of the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston. From 1976 to 1985, he served as head of the Section of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology at the University of California, San Francisco, where he was an investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. In 1985, he was appointed the William Osler professor of medicine, director of the Department of Medicine, and physician-in-chief of the Johns Hopkins University Hospital. In 1994, he became the chairman and chief executive officer of Johns Hopkins Health Care, L.L.C., an organization created to address challenges in managed care on behalf of Johns Hopkins Medicine. He has served as president of the American Association of Professors of Medicine, president of the American College of Rheumatology, and chairman of the American Board of Internal Medicine. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine and chaired its Board on Health Sciences Policy. Stobo has an AB from Dartmouth College and an MD from S.U.N.Y. at Buffalo.

MARLA E. SALMON (Vice Chair) is dean and chief executive officer of the Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing at Emory University. Formerly an associate dean and director of graduate studies at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, she also served as director of the Division of Nursing for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Throughout her career, her research interests have included health policy, administration, and health workforce development, with particular emphasis on the importance of public health nursing. She has received numerous awards, including the Presidential Meritorious Executive Award and the U.S. Public Health Special Service Award.



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 331
Confronting Chronic Neglect: The Education and Training of Health Professionals on Family Violence Appendix I Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff JOHN D. STOBO (Chair) is president of the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston. From 1976 to 1985, he served as head of the Section of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology at the University of California, San Francisco, where he was an investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. In 1985, he was appointed the William Osler professor of medicine, director of the Department of Medicine, and physician-in-chief of the Johns Hopkins University Hospital. In 1994, he became the chairman and chief executive officer of Johns Hopkins Health Care, L.L.C., an organization created to address challenges in managed care on behalf of Johns Hopkins Medicine. He has served as president of the American Association of Professors of Medicine, president of the American College of Rheumatology, and chairman of the American Board of Internal Medicine. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine and chaired its Board on Health Sciences Policy. Stobo has an AB from Dartmouth College and an MD from S.U.N.Y. at Buffalo. MARLA E. SALMON (Vice Chair) is dean and chief executive officer of the Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing at Emory University. Formerly an associate dean and director of graduate studies at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, she also served as director of the Division of Nursing for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Throughout her career, her research interests have included health policy, administration, and health workforce development, with particular emphasis on the importance of public health nursing. She has received numerous awards, including the Presidential Meritorious Executive Award and the U.S. Public Health Special Service Award.

OCR for page 331
Confronting Chronic Neglect: The Education and Training of Health Professionals on Family Violence She is a member of the Institute of Medicine and has been both nationally and internationally recognized for her contributions to health policies influencing health care delivery systems. She has a BS and a BSN from the University of Portland and an ScD from Johns Hopkins University. ELAINE J. ALPERT has been on the faculty of the Boston University School of Public Health since 1984 and is currently an associate professor of public health and medicine and the assistant dean for student affairs. She has been active for several years in health professional education and community outreach in the area of family violence. She spearheaded the development of a model curriculum on family violence for the Boston University School of Medicine and has created a comprehensive postgraduate curriculum on domestic violence in collaboration with the Massachusetts Medical Society. She is also a faculty trainer for the Family Violence Prevention Fund. She serves on numerous state and national advisory panels concerned with the health professions’ response to family violence and has spoken extensively to physicians, other health professions groups, and community organizations about the role of health care professionals in responding to and preventing family violence and abuse. Alpert has an MD from the University of Michigan School of Medicine and an MPH from the Boston University School of Public Health. JACQUELYN C. CAMPBELL is the associate dean of doctoral education programs and research and is jointly appointed to the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing and the School of Hygiene and Public Health Center for Injury Control. Her overall research focus is on women’s physical, emotional, and behavioral responses to battering in intimate relationships, including marital rape, resultant homicide, abuse during pregnancy, and violence in adolescent relationships. She is also interested in cultural influences on intimate partner violence in Africa and Latin America as well as in local communities. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine and served on its Board of International Health; she also served on the National Research Council’s Committee on Family Violence Intervention Evaluations. She is a member of the Department of Defense Task Force on Violence Against Women. She has provided consultation on intimate partner violence to the National Institute of Justice, the Ford and Robert Wood Johnson Foundations, the Milbank Fund, and the World Health Organization. Campbell has a BSN from the Duke University School of Nursing, an MSN from Wright State University, and a PhD from the University of Rochester School of Nursing. MICHAEL I. COHEN has been chairman of the Department of Pediatrics at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine/Montefiore Medical Center since 1980 and a member of the faculty there since 1967. A graduate of Columbia College, he has an MD from Columbia University, did his pediatric training at Babies Hospital in New York City, and held a National Institutes of Health postdoctoral

OCR for page 331
Confronting Chronic Neglect: The Education and Training of Health Professionals on Family Violence fellowship at Einstein before beginning his career in exploring the issues of adolescent development. He established one of the first programs in the nation in adolescent medicine at Montefiore in 1967, which has served as a prototype for similar programs throughout the United States. He is the former president and chief executive officer of the Montefiore Medical Center in New York and was elected a member of the Institute of Medicine in 1990. He served on the Council on Adolescent Development of the Carnegie Corporation of New York and was the vice chair of an advisory committee on adolescent health to the Office of Technology Assessment for the U.S. Congress. He is a trustee of the Foundation for Child Development. FELICIA COHN (Study Director) is a program officer with the Board on Children, Youth, and Families of the Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. Previously, she was the director of the program in bioethics in the Department of Health Care Sciences and a senior scientist with the Center to Improve Care of the Dying of the George Washington University Medical Center. She teaches health professional students and serves on the Ethics Committee at George Washington Hospital. Cohn has written extensively on end-of-life care and ethics education and consults regularly on a number of ethical issues. She has an MA and a PhD in religious ethics (bioethics) from the University of Virginia. DEBORAH EPSTEIN is an associate professor at the Georgetown University Law Center and has spent more than 15 years working as an advocate for victims of domestic violence. Since 1993, she has directed the Law Center’s Domestic Violence Clinic, where she supervises students representing battered women in civil protection order cases. She is co-director of the D.C. Superior Court’s Domestic Violence Intake Center and served as co-chair of the recent effort to create a specialized Domestic Violence Court in the District of Columbia. She has served on numerous local, national, and international advisory panels on the role of the justice system in responding to family violence. She has served as director and as a board member for various advocacy organizations in the domestic violence field. Epstein has a BA from Brown and a JD from New York University. SHERYL HERON is an assistant residency director and an assistant professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine at the Emory University School of Medicine. She is a board-certified emergency medicine physician and was the 1996-97 injury control fellow for the Center for Injury Control at Emory. She was a member of the Georgia Commission on Family Violence Medical Protocols Committee that was charged with writing the medical protocol on domestic violence for the state of Georgia. Her primary research interest is the prevention of violence against women; other interests include resident education, international emergency medicine, and diversity. She has a BS from Tufts University, an MPH from Hunter College, and an MD from Howard University.

OCR for page 331
Confronting Chronic Neglect: The Education and Training of Health Professionals on Family Violence SUSAN R. JOHNSON is the associate dean for faculty affairs of the University of Iowa College of Medicine, professor of obstetrics and gynecology in that college, and professor of epidemiology in the College of Public Health. She is an examiner for the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology, a member of the National Board of Medical Examiners, and a member of the Iowa Board of Medical Examiners. Her clinical and research interests are in the areas of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and menopausal health issues, particularly the use of hormones and other drugs in postmenopausal women. She directs both the PMS Clinic and the Menopause Clinic at the Women’s Health Center of the University of Iowa Hospital and Clinics and serves as the medical director of the Family Planning Council of Iowa. She is an investigator with the Women’s Health Initiative sponsored by the National Institutes of Health and is active at the national level in this trial. She also serves on the data, safety, and monitoring boards of several other multicenter clinical trials of various postmenopausal preventive drugs and has written numerous articles and chapters regarding these issues. Johnson has a BS, an MS, and an MD from the University of Iowa. RICHARD D. KRUGMAN is professor of pediatrics and dean of the University of Colorado School of Medicine. His career has included a two-year appointment with the Public Health Service at the National Institutes of Health and the Food and Drug Administration, as well as a Robert Wood Johnson Health Policy Fellowship in the office of U.S. Senator Durenberger of Minnesota. He served as director of the C. Henry Kempe National Center for the Prevention and Treatment of Child Abuse and Neglect from 1981 to 1992. From 1988 to 1991, he headed the U.S. Advisory Board of Child Abuse and Neglect, which issued a landmark national report in 1990. He has chaired the American Academy of Pediatrics Child Abuse Committee and more recently worked with the Association of American Medical Colleges on family violence issues and the American Professional Society on the Abuse of Children Legislative Advisory Committee. He is editor-in-chief of Child Abuse and Neglect: The International Journal and is a past president of the International Society for the Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect. Krugman has an MD from New York University School of Medicine and did a residency in pediatrics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. MARK S. LACHS is the director of geriatrics for the New York Presbyterian Health System and an associate professor of medicine and co-chief of the Division of Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology at the Weill Medical College of Cornell University. A graduate of the New York University School of Medicine, he completed his residency in internal medicine at the hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and is board certified in internal medicine with a certificate of added qualification in geriatric medicine. He was a Robert Wood Johnson clinical scholar at Yale University, where he also earned a master’s degree in public

OCR for page 331
Confronting Chronic Neglect: The Education and Training of Health Professionals on Family Violence health. He has published widely on issues in aging, including elder abuse and neglect, adult protective services, the measurement of functional status, ethics, and the financing of health care. GARY B. MELTON is director of the Institute on Family and Neighborhood Life, professor of psychology, and an adjunct professor of family and youth development at Clemson University. A fellow of the American Psychological Association (APA) and eight of its divisions, he is a past president of the American Psychology-Law Society and the APA Division of Child, Youth, and Family Services. As director of the Consortium on Children, Families, and the Law, a national network of policy research centers, he organizes a regular congressional briefing series. His work has been cited by U.S. courts at all levels; he was the principal architect of the new national child protection strategy proposed by the U.S. Advisory Board on Child Abuse and Neglect. He also served as a member of the U.S. attorney general’s Expert Panel on Youth Violence. The author of approximately 300 publications, he is active in research on services for children and families in diverse contexts. He has been principal investigator on projects funded by the National Institute of Mental Health, the National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect, the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, and various state agencies and private organizations. Melton has a BA from the University of Virginia and an MA and a PhD in clinical-community psychology from Boston University. GREGORY J. PAVEZA is a professor in the School of Social Work at the University of South Florida. He has a BA in psychology from Lewis College in Illinois, an MSW from the School of Social Work at the University of Hawaii, and a PhD in public health sciences (psychiatric epidemiology) from the University of Illinois at Chicago. He has been a social work practitioner and an agency administrator. Since completing his doctorate in 1986, he has been a faculty member for the School of Public Health of the University of Illinois at Chicago; the director of the Center for Long Term Mental Health Evaluation, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs; and an associate professor for the University of South Florida. His research interests include issues related to the social consequences of caregiving and Alzheimer’s disease, including elder mistreatment in these families as well in the broader community. GEORGINE M. PION is a research associate professor of psychology in the Department of Psychology and Human Development at Vanderbilt University and a senior fellow in the Vanderbilt Institute for Public Policy Studies. She has a PhD from Claremont Graduate School and did postdoctoral research training in the Division of Methodology and Evaluation Research at Northwestern University. She has served on committees involved in the evaluation of training programs for the National Research Council, the National Science Foundation, and

OCR for page 331
Confronting Chronic Neglect: The Education and Training of Health Professionals on Family Violence the National Institute of Mental Health. Her interests include assessment of programs for at-risk populations, evaluation research and practitioner training, factors influencing career progression and outcomes in the biomedical and behavioral sciences, and evaluation and survey methodology. MICHAEL A. RODRIGUEZ is an assistant professor in residence in the Department of Family and Community Medicine and the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). He is also a faculty member at its Center for Aging in Diverse Communities. He is an undergraduate alumnus of the University of California, Berkeley, attended medical school at the University of California, Los Angeles, completed his residency training at UCSF, and has a public health degree from Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health. In addition, he was a Robert Wood Johnson clinical scholar and a Picker/Commonwealth scholar. He conducts research, collaborates with direct service and advocacy organizations, and is responsible for policy development on areas of concern to clinical practice, including violence prevention and minority health. His research includes a focus on improving the health care response to abused women from diverse backgrounds. He also teaches UCSF’s residents and medical students while maintaining a family medicine practice at San Francisco General Hospital. ROBERT S. THOMPSON is a clinical professor of pediatrics and health services research at the University of Washington and the director of the Department of Preventive Care at the Group Health Cooperative of Puget Sound. A member of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Task Force on Community Preventive Services since 1996, he has practiced pediatrics and worked as a clinical epidemiologist at the Group Health Cooperative since 1972. Since 1997, he has devoted professional time to the development, implementation, and evaluation of population-based clinical prevention services. His current funded research projects include adverse outcomes of immunizations, vaccine studies, domestic violence identification and management in primary care, HIV risk identification and management, “Healthy Steps”—a large-scale child development project—and translating knowledge on chlamydia screening into practice. He has a BA from Amherst College and an MD from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.