Biographical Sketches

Christopher T. Cross (Chair) is president of the Council for Basic Education in Washington, DC. Previously he served as director of the Education Initiative for the Business Roundtable, as the president of the Maryland State Board of Education, and as the assistant secretary for educational research and improvement, U.S. Department of Education. He has served on the National Research Council’s Board of International Comparative Studies in Education and on the Committee on Program Evaluation in Education. He has published numerous articles on education policy and served on a variety of boards of education associations. He has an A.B. in political science from Whittier College and an M.A. in government from California State University at Los Angeles.

Carolyn M. Callahan is a professor in the Curry School of Education, University of Virginia, and also associate director of the National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented. She teaches courses in the area of education of the gifted and is executive director of the summer enrichment program. She has authored numerous articles, book chapters, and monographs on the topics of creativity, the identification of gifted students, program evaluation, and the issues faced by gifted females. She has received recognition as outstanding faculty member in the Commonwealth of Virginia and was awarded the distinguished scholar award from the National



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Minority Students in Special and Gifted Education Biographical Sketches Christopher T. Cross (Chair) is president of the Council for Basic Education in Washington, DC. Previously he served as director of the Education Initiative for the Business Roundtable, as the president of the Maryland State Board of Education, and as the assistant secretary for educational research and improvement, U.S. Department of Education. He has served on the National Research Council’s Board of International Comparative Studies in Education and on the Committee on Program Evaluation in Education. He has published numerous articles on education policy and served on a variety of boards of education associations. He has an A.B. in political science from Whittier College and an M.A. in government from California State University at Los Angeles. Carolyn M. Callahan is a professor in the Curry School of Education, University of Virginia, and also associate director of the National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented. She teaches courses in the area of education of the gifted and is executive director of the summer enrichment program. She has authored numerous articles, book chapters, and monographs on the topics of creativity, the identification of gifted students, program evaluation, and the issues faced by gifted females. She has received recognition as outstanding faculty member in the Commonwealth of Virginia and was awarded the distinguished scholar award from the National

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Minority Students in Special and Gifted Education Association for Gifted Children. She is a past president of the Association for the Gifted and the National Association for Gifted Children. She serves on the editorial boards of Gifted Child Quarterly, the Journal for the Education of the Gifted, and Roeper Review. M. Suzanne Donovan (Study Director) is a program officer at the National Research Council’s Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Her work focuses on education and public policy. She is currently associate director of the Strategic Education Research Partnership and study director of a project that will produce a volume for teachers titled How Students Learn: History, Math and Science in the Classroom. She was coeditor of two previous NRC reports: How People Learn: Bridging Research and Practice, and Eager to Learn: Educating Our Preschoolers. She has a Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley School of Public Policy and was previously on the faculty of Columbia University’s School of Public and International Affairs. Beth Harry is professor of special education in the Department of Teaching and Learning at the University of Miami. Formerly she was associate professor at the University of Maryland, College Park. Her research has focused on parent-professional relationships related to disabilities and on the issue of ethnic disproportionality in special education. Her studies of parental perspectives and experiences, funded by the Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP), focused on ethnic minority parents of children with disabilities, with a particular focus on black and Hispanic families. Her current research, also funded by OSEP, uses ethnographic research methods to examine the process by which minorities become overrepresented in special education programs. Her teaching reflects her combined interest in special education, multicultural education, family issues, and qualitative research methods. A native of Jamaica, she has bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Toronto, Canada, and a Ph.D. in special education from Syracuse University. Samuel R. Lucas is associate professor of sociology at the University of California, Berkeley. He currently serves on the technical review panel for the Education Longitudinal Study of 2002 and the sociology advisory panel of the National Science Foundation. He coauthored Inequality by Design: Cracking the Bell Curve Myth with five colleagues in the Sociology Department at Berkeley; the book received a Gustavus Myers Center award for the study of human rights in North America in 1997. His book on tracking, Tracking Inequality: Stratification and Mobility in American High Schools, received the Willard Waller award in 2000 for the most outstanding book

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Minority Students in Special and Gifted Education in the sociology of education for 1997, 1998, and 1999. He received a bachelor’s degree from Haverford College in 1986, was awarded a National Science Foundation Minority Graduate Fellowship in 1988, and completed a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison as a Ford Foundation minority doctoral dissertation fellow in 1994. Donald L. MacMillan is professor of education at the University of California, Riverside. He has conducted research on problems in measuring disproportion in the representation of minorities in special education programs and on mainstreaming minority children. He has published widely on special education issues for the past 30 years, particularly in the area of mental retardation. He has also conducted research on issues of identification and assessment of children with learning disabilities. Among his many awards, he received the career research scientist award from the Academy on Mental Retardation, the research award from the Council for Exceptional Children in 1998, the outstanding research award from the special education special interest group of the American Educational Research Association in 1998, the education award of the American Association on Mental Retardation in 1990, and the Edgar A. Doll award from Division 33 of the American Psychological Association in 1989. He has an Ed.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles. Margaret J. McLaughlin is associate director of the Institute for the Study of Exceptional Children and Youth at the University of Maryland at College Park, where she directs several national projects related to school reform and special education. Her recent research publications examine the extent to which students with disabilities and special education programs interact with school reform initiatives, including standard assessments and new accountability systems. She served as cochair of the National Research Council’s Committee on Goals 2000 and the Inclusion of Students with Disabilities. She has a Ph.D. in education from the University of Virginia. Diana Pullin is an attorney, professor, and former dean of the School of Education at Boston College. As a practicing attorney, she has represented school districts, teachers’ unions, parents, students, and educators in a broad range of matters concerning education law, civil rights, and employment, and she is best known for representing a class of students that successfully challenged Florida’s requirement that students pass a minimum-competency test in order to graduate. Her research and teaching focus on education law, particularly testing. She served as a member of the National Research Council’s Committee on Goals 2000 and the Inclusion of Students with Disabilities. She has a J.D. and a Ph.D., the latter in education, from the University of Iowa.

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Minority Students in Special and Gifted Education Craig Ramey is director of the Civitan International Research Center and professor of psychology, pediatrics, sociology, nursing, maternal and child health, and neurobiology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. He is also director of the university’s affiliated program for developmental disabilities. He has conducted extensive research on early interventions for young, high-risk, and disabled children, including work in the Carolina Abecedarian Project—a longitudinal and multidisciplinary approach to the prevention of developmental retardation. He has developed curricula for infant development and for early intervention with low-birthweight infants. He has also written books on parenting focused on building a child’s foundation for life in the early years. Among his many awards are the Chautauqua award for outstanding contribution to the field of developmental disabilities and the American Psychological Association’s award for exemplary prevention programs. He has a Ph.D. in life-span developmental psychology from West Virginia University. John B. Reid is executive director of the Oregon Social Learning Center and director of the Oregon Prevention Research Center. He has published widely on assessment methodology and the development of conduct problems and delinquency and has developed and evaluated several family- and school-based interventions for the prevention of delinquency, child abuse, and substance use. He has a Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Oregon. Daniel Reschly is professor of education and psychology at the George Peabody College, Vanderbilt University, where he chairs the Department of Special Education. He has conducted extensive research on assessments of disabilities in minority children and youth, school psychology professional practices, system reform, and legal issues in special education. From 1975 to 1998 he directed the Iowa State University School Psychology Program and achieved the rank of distinguished professor of psychology and education. Among his many awards are three National Association of School Psychologists distinguished awards and the Stroud award. He served on the National Research Council’s Committee on Goals 2000 and the Inclusion of Students with Disabilities, and he is chair of its Committee on Disability Determination in Mental Retardation. He has a Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Oregon. Robert Rueda is professor in the Division of Learning and Instruction in the School of Education at the University of Southern California. His research interests include the sociocultural basis of learning and instruction, with a focus on academic achievement (especially reading) in at-risk, language minority students and students with mild learning disabilities. He has also conducted research on children’s acquisition and uses of literacy and teach-

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Minority Students in Special and Gifted Education ing and learning issues related to the academic achievement of language minority students in public school settings. He has a Ph.D. in educational psychology and special education from the University of California, Los Angeles. Bennett A. Shaywitz is professor of pediatrics and neurology and director of pediatric neurology at the Yale University School of Medicine. His research uses functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to study children with dyslexia, and he currently leads a research group that is using this technology to investigate the neural basis of reading, dyslexia, and most recently mathematics disability. These ongoing studies have resulted in the first demonstration of sex differences in the functional organization of the brain for higher cognitive function. Recently he and his colleagues have used this technology to discover differences in brain organization and function in children and adults with dyslexia, and he now uses fMRI to study how the brain changes as children with dyslexia are taught to read. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine. With his wife, Sally Shaywitz, he was the recipient of the 2001 Leonard Apt lectureship of the American Academy of Pediatrics and the 2001 inaugural Samuel T. Orton and June Lyday Orton lectureship of the International Dyslexia Association. Margaret Beale Spencer is professor of education and psychology at the University of Pennsylvania. She also serves as director of the Center for Health, Achievement, Neighborhood, Growth, and Ethnic Studies (CHANGES) and the W.E.B. Du Bois Collective Research Institute at the university. She is the principal investigator for the center’s multiethnic longitudinal studies, including project PAC (Promotion of Academic Competence), a five-year longitudinal project that represents a sample of extremely impoverished, southern, inner-city, and mostly male adolescents. Her research interests include exploring the predictors of resiliency by examining the interface between physiological functioning, socioemotional development, and undergirding cognitive processes as linked to context character. She focuses on gender, race, and ethnic patterns in her program of developmental research, which has been published as edited volumes, as well as numerous articles and chapters. She serves on several editorial review boards and as a board member and trustee of the National 4-H Council and the Foundation for Child Development. She has a Ph.D. in child and developmental psychology from the University of Chicago. Edward Lee Vargas currently serves as superintendent for the Hacienda La Puente Unified School District in Los Angeles County, California. Formerly he was superintendent of the Ysleta Independent School District, the highest-achieving of all large urban districts in Texas, and has 25 years of

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Minority Students in Special and Gifted Education experience as a teacher, diagnostician, school psychologist, site administrator, and in various central office leadership positions in special education, including service as an assistant superintendent. He has provided leadership to school systems in Albuquerque, New Mexico, Santa Ana, California, and Texas. He was a member of the NRC Committee on Goals 2000 and the Inclusion of Students with Disabilities. He has bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of New Mexico and a doctorate in educational studies from the University of Washington. Sharon Vaughn is the Mollie V. Davis professor at the University of Texas, Austin. Her areas of research and professional expertise include reading for children with learning and behavioral problems, social development and self-concept of children with learning and behavior problems, and the development of inclusion programs that address academic success for all children in general education classrooms. She worked as a public school teacher from 1973 to 1980. She has a Ph.D. in education and child development from the University of Arizona.