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Appendixes

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Appendix A Biographical Information on the Committee on Vehicle Emission I Inspection and Maintenance Programs Ralph J. Cicerone (Chair) is the chancellor of the University of California at Irvine and the Daniel G. Aldrich Professor in the DeparDnent of Earth System Science and the Department of Chemistry. He is also a member of the National Academy of Sciences. His areas of research include the study of atmospheric and human processes important in stratospheric ozone depletion and global climate change. Dr. Cicerone received his B.S. from the Massa- chusetts Institute of Technology and his M. S. and Ph.D. from the University of Illinois. David T. Allen (Vice-Chair) is the Reese Professor in Chemical Engineering and the Director ofthe Center for Energy and Environmental Resources at the University of Texas at Austin. He conducts research in atmospheric chemis- try, emissions inventory development, and air-quality modeling. Dr. Allen received his B.S. from Cornell University and his M.S. and Ph.D. from the California Institute of Technology. Matthew J. Barth is an associate professor at the Center for Environmental Research and Technology of the College of Engineering at the University of California et Riverside. He is the manager ofkansportation systems research and is currently principal investigator on several transportation and emissions modeling programs, including the development of a comprehensive emissions 229

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230 Evaluating Vehicle Emissions I/M Programs model. He received his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical and computer engineering from the University of California at Santa Barbara. Hugh Ellis is chair ofthe Department of Geography and Environmental Eng~- neeringatThe Johns Hopkins Universityin Baltimore end holds ajointappoint- ment in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences. His research interests focus on the development of uncertainty and risk-based approaches for environmental management, including the use of such techniques for as- sessing emissions-controlpolicies. He received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in civil engineering from The University of Waterloo in Ontario, Can- ada. Gerald Gallagher is president of ~ Gallagher and Associates. Previously, he served as manager ofthe Mobile Sources Program for the Air Pollution Con- tro! Division ofthe Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment. His responsibilities included the operation of a metrowide inspection and main- tenance program, consisting of approximately ~ . ~ million inspections per year for gasoline and diesel vehicles. In addition, he was an assistant professor at Colorado State University, where he assisted in the formation ofthe National Center for Vehicle Emissions Control and Safety. Dr. Gallagher received his B. S. from Northern TIlinois University, his M.E. from Colorado State Univer- sity, and his Ph.D. from the University of Colorado. Deborah Gordon is a transportation consultant. Previously, she was the director of the Project on Transportation and the Environment at the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies in the university's Center for Transportation and the Environment, which provides technical and policy ex- pertise on transportation policy to corporations, state agencies, nonprofit orga- nizations, end the news media. She also served as the director oftransporta- tion and energy programs with the Union of Concerned Scientists, where she developed transportation policies such as the clean-car incentive program. She earned a B . S . in chemical engineering from the University of Colorado and an M.P.P. from the University of California at Berkeley. Robert A. Harley is an associate professor in the Civil and Environmental Engineenug Department ofthe University of California at Berkeley. He stud- ies the sources, atmospheric transport, and photochemical reactions associated

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Appendix A 231 with air pollution with a special interest in the role of mobile sources (especially gasoline- and diesel-powered vehicles) in these issues. Dr. Harley directs research on air quality modeling, motor vehicle emissions characteristics, and the impact of reformulated gasolines on emissions. He received his Ph.D. in environmental engineering science from the California Institute of Technology. Harold Haskew is president of Harold Haskew and Associates. Prior to that, Mr. Haskew spent 42 years at General Motors Corporation where he directed many automotive emissions testing programs end was involved with regulatory issues. His work et General Motors included comprehensive studies on vehicle emissions controls, the durability of control systems in actual use, and the ability of short-duration tests to identify problems in condom systems. He holds a B.M.E. from the General Motors Institute. Douglas R. Lawson is a principal scientist at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) where he heads the Environmental Science and Health Effects Program. Before joining NREL, Dr. Lawson was the technical project manager for the Northern Front Range Study at Colorado State University, a program designed to identify the sources of urban air pollutants in the Denver metropolitan area. He has also been involved in programs to assess motor vehicle inspection and maintenance programs as well as those to identify and repair high-emitting vehicles. Dr. Lawson received his Ph.D. in chemical oceanography from Florida State University. Virginia McConnell is a senior fellow in the Quality of the Environment Division of Resources for the Future (RFF). She is also a professor of eco- nomics et the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. Her recent work has centered on the evaluation of policies to reduce motor vehicle pollution, includ- ing the analysis of inspection and maintenance programs, old-car scrap pro- grams, end emissions taxes. She has also analyzed the impactofenvironmen- talregulations on industry productivity and on facility-Iocation decisions. She received her B.S. in economics from Smith College and her Ph.D. in econom- ics from the University of Maryland. Alison K. PoBack is a principal at ENVIRON Corporation, an environmental consulting firm. Her work is in the analysis of mobile source emissions data, the evaluation of mobile source control programs, and the development and

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232 Eval?'ati7~g Vehicle Emissions I/M Programs evaluation of on-road and off-road mobile source emissions models. Ms. PolIack received her B. S . and M. S. degrees from Princeton University and the University of Wisconsin-Madison, respectively. Robert SIott is a visiting engineer at Energy Laboratory ofthe Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Prior to that, Mr. SIott spent 34 years at Shell Oil Company. He retired as its technology planning director in ~ 997. His research interests include measuring the effectiveness of vehicle emissions-control strategies, including the assessment of inspection and maintenance programs. He earnedhis B.S., M.S., and Sc.D. in chemical engineering from the Massa- chusetts Institute of Technology.