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Annex B:

Biographies of Contributors*

DAVID AUSTIN

David Austin is a fellow in Resources for the Future's (RFF) Quality of the Environment division. He joined RFF in 1993. Dr. Austin's research interests include the welfare effects of innovation; corporate environmental performance and public policy; technology and transportation modeling; and integrated assessment of environmental costs and benefits.

His recent work includes the development of a quality-adjusted cost index method for estimating future returns from innovation. The index permits estimation of private and public economic benefits of technology-driven services—in the renewable energy, information, and space exploration sectors—for which consumer demand is not directly observable. This work has implications for efficient R&D resource allocation, both in the public and private sectors.

Dr. Austin is also currently studying private incentives for firms to improve their environmental performance. His recent, co-authored econometric studies of state environmental liability policy indicate that states in the U.S. have tended to adopt strict liability policies in response to perceived problems with chemical spills and accidents, and that these policies have resulted in fewer spills. Currently he is examining firm-level data on environmental performance and profitability for thus-far elusive evidence of causality. This research addresses the belief by some in the environmental policy community that many firms have failed to recognize the profit potential in reducing their emissions.

* As of February 2001. Biographies were submitted for inclusion by the authors of the papers.



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Page 287 Annex B: Biographies of Contributors* DAVID AUSTIN David Austin is a fellow in Resources for the Future's (RFF) Quality of the Environment division. He joined RFF in 1993. Dr. Austin's research interests include the welfare effects of innovation; corporate environmental performance and public policy; technology and transportation modeling; and integrated assessment of environmental costs and benefits. His recent work includes the development of a quality-adjusted cost index method for estimating future returns from innovation. The index permits estimation of private and public economic benefits of technology-driven services—in the renewable energy, information, and space exploration sectors—for which consumer demand is not directly observable. This work has implications for efficient R&D resource allocation, both in the public and private sectors. Dr. Austin is also currently studying private incentives for firms to improve their environmental performance. His recent, co-authored econometric studies of state environmental liability policy indicate that states in the U.S. have tended to adopt strict liability policies in response to perceived problems with chemical spills and accidents, and that these policies have resulted in fewer spills. Currently he is examining firm-level data on environmental performance and profitability for thus-far elusive evidence of causality. This research addresses the belief by some in the environmental policy community that many firms have failed to recognize the profit potential in reducing their emissions. * As of February 2001. Biographies were submitted for inclusion by the authors of the papers.

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Page 288 His work in transportation economics centers on travel-demand forecasting as a vehicle for studying the potential of Intelligent Transportation Systems technologies, and congestion-pricing policies to reduce highway congestion and improve welfare. Austin has also recently helped initiate a study of the economic implications of potential policies toward utility-generated mercury emissions, including the posting of fish advisories. With this work, he again takes up the modeling of aquatic effects of atmospheric pollutant deposition, for which he developed a detailed, integrated-assessment model of Maryland's principal aquatic ecosystems. His work has been published in The American Economic Review, the Journal of Regulatory Economics, the Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, and Contemporary Economic Policy, among others. Dr. Austin is a member of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists. He received his Bachelor's degree in mathematics from Stanford University, his Master's degree in statistics from Yale University, and his Ph.D. in economics from the University of California at Berkeley. ALAN P. BALUTIS Alan Balutis is the Director of the Advanced Technology Program. He came to Washington in 1975 as a National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration (NASPAA) Fellow. He worked in a variety of budget, personnel, policy and legislation, and management analysis positions at the then-Department of Health, Education and Welfare (HEW) before coming to the Department of Commerce in 1979. At HEW, he was a member of a small staff assembled to implement major Departmental reorganization, involving several programs with a combined budget of over $52 billion and more than 10,000 employees. Prior to coming to Washington, he served as an Assistant Professor of Political Science at the State University of New York at Buffalo and worked with the New York State Legislature and the National Conference of State Legislatures. He is the author or co-author of four books, over 100 articles, and numerous conference papers on government reorganization, legislative reform, budgeting, and internship programs. In the Department of Commerce, he worked as Director, Office of Systems and Special Projects (1983-84), as Director, Office of Management and Organization (1984-87), as Director for Budget, Management, and Information (1987-98), and as Deputy Chief Information Officer (1998-2000), where he was responsible for Information Technology (IT) and oversight of total expenditures of $1.1 billion and created the first major systems oversight board in the government. In April 2000, he was appointed Director of the Advanced Technology Program at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. An active member of the newly established CIO Council, he headed their Strategic Planning Committee and the Outreach Committee. He currently co-chairs the Electronic Government Committee.

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Page 289 He was the first recipient of the Annual Commerce Award for Outstanding Management and received the Silver Medal (1983) and the Gold Medal (1986)— the Department's two highest honors. He also is a recipient of two Presidential rank awards (1988 and 1995) and has been named for four years in a row to the Federal 100 by Federal Computer Week as a major player in the IT community. In 1998, he was elected as a Fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration. TAYLER H. BINGHAM Tayler Bingham is Director of Research Triangle Institute's Center for Regulatory Economics and Policy Research, which conducts research related to environmental and natural resources, food, and new technologies. The Center employs microeconomic, financial, technical modeling using interdisciplinary frameworks; primary data collection and analysis; and benefit-cost, cost-effectiveness, and economic impact analyses to evaluate alternative public policies. Mr. Bingham has evaluated both traditional administrative regulations and innovative economic instruments such as fees and transferable permits designed to protect or improve the quality of the environment and promote the sustainable management of natural resources. He has also contributed to analyses of the potential of new technologies to contribute to economic welfare, modeling technology diffusion and valuing the social benefits and costs of the technologies employing micro-economic methods and applied welfare economics principles. Mr. Bingham is a member of the American Economic Association. He is also a member of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists and has served on its Board of Directors and participated in association activities. He authored a chapter on environmental benefits valuation and has published papers in the Journal of Environmental Economics and Management and Public Finance Quarterly. He has taught microeconomic theory and environmental economics at North Carolina State University and environmental economics at Duke University. JEFFREY H. DYER Jeffrey Dyer is Associate Professor and Donald Staheli Chair in International Strategy at Brigham Young University. He previously served on the faculty at the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School. His research interests include strategic alliances and international joint ventures; interorganizational learning and knowledge management; and interorganizational trust. Dr. Dyer is the author of a number of articles published in journals such as Harvard Business Review, Strategic Management Journal, Academy of Management Review, and California Management Review. He is the author of the book Collaborative Advantage, recently published by Oxford University Press. He has been awarded the McKinsey/Strategic Management Society Best Paper Prize,

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Page 290and the University-wide undergraduate Teaching Award and other MBA excellence in teaching awards at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Dyer holds a Ph.D. in management from the University of California, Los Angeles, and an MBA from Brigham Young University. Jeffrey Dyer's co-author, Benjamin C. Powell, is a Ph.D. candidate in the Management Department at the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania. He holds an M.A. from the University of Pennsylvania in Applied Economics and Managerial Science and an MBA from the Kenan-Flagler Business School, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Mr. Powell's six years of professional experience includes working for Milliken & Company's alliance with TRW to develop air bag fabrics and work as a consultant with Heiniburg Corporation setting up automotive joint ventures in Thailand. MARYANN P. FELDMAN Maryann P. Feldman is Research Scientist at the Institute for Policy Studies and Associate Professor of Economics at Johns Hopkins University. She received her B.A. from Ohio State University, and her Ph.D. from Carnegie Mellon University. She previously taught economics at Western Maryland College and Goucher College. Before coming to Hopkins, she was on the faculty at the H.J. Heinz School at Carnegie Mellon. Dr. Feldman is the author of over thirty academic articles that have been published in such journals as The American Economic Review, The Review of Economics and Statistics, and The Annals of the Association of American Geographers. Her Ph.D. dissertation, The Geography of Innovation, was published in 1994 by Kluwer Academic Publishers and is now in its second printing. She edited The Handbook of Economic Geography for Oxford University Press (with Gordon Clark and Meric Gertler), published in 2000. Forthcoming books include Innovation Policy for A Knowledge-Based Economy (with Al Link) and Institutions and Systems in the Geography of Innovation (with Nadine Massard). Dr. Feldman has also served as a consultant to private business, various federal, state and local agencies and non-profit organizations. She has received grants from the National Science Foundation, the Mellon Foundation, the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the German Marshall Fund, and the U.S. Small Business Administration, among others. She is an author of the 1998 monograph Biosciences in Maryland: A Closer Look as well as “Role of the Department of Defense in Building Biotech Expertise” in the 2000 National Research Council report, The Small Business Innovation Research Program: An Assessment of the Department of Defense Fast Track Initiative. MARYELLEN R. KELLEY Maryellen R. Kelley is the Principal Partner at Pamet Hill Associates, a con

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Page 291suiting firm that provides business planning and program evaluation services to firms and to R&D programs of government agencies. She was Senior Economist in the Economic Assessment Office of the Advanced Technology Program (ATP) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology from 1997-2000. Prior to her service at the ATP, Dr. Kelley was on the faculty of Carnegie Mellon University. She also held faculty and research appointments at Harvard University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the University of Massachusetts. She received her B.A. from Brandeis University, a Masters degree from Harvard University in City and Regional Planning, and a Ph.D. in management from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She has published extensively on economic, management, and policy issues concerning technological change, in such journals as The American Sociological Review, Economic Development Quarterly, Management Science, Research Policy, and Science. BARBARA LAMBIS Barbara Lambis is the Senior Policy and Operations Advisor to the Director, Advanced Technology Program (ATP) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Ms. Lambis is the key focal point for providing policy and administrative guidance to the ATP and the general public. She is responsible for formulating policies and procedures, developing and implementing regulations, and providing operational guidance to the ATP. She serves as program liaison with the Office of General Counsel, Office of Inspector General, General Accounting Office, and the Office of Management and Budget. Ms. Lambis has worked at the Department of Commerce since 1969. Prior to coming to NIST in 1994, Ms. Lambis was the Director, Office of Federal Assistance, Department of Commerce (DoC). Ms. Lambis was responsible for grant and cooperative agreement-related policy development and implementation for the DoC and was a Grants Officer. She served as a senior consultant to top level staff of DoC operating units and the Office of the Secretary in grants administration matters. Ms. Lambis also worked at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, DoC, performing grants management activities. Ms. Lambis earned a B.A. degree in english from the University of Maryland. She has received numerous awards and citations at the Department of Commerce, including the Award for Outstanding Administrative Management and Employee of the Year Award (Management/Supervisory). ALBERT N. LINK Albert N. Link is Professor of Economics at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. He received his B.S. in mathematics from the University of Richmond in 1971 and his Ph.D. in economics from Tulane University in 1976. Prior to joining the faculty at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro in 1982,

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Page 292he was on the faculty at Auburn University and was scholar in residence at Syracuse University. Professor Link's research focuses broadly on the economics of science and technology policy. His publications encompass many dimensions of that field ranging from philosophy of science to the mathematical theory of productivity growth. More specifically, Professor Link has written extensively on methods for evaluating public sector and private sector research and development, technology policies to promote economic growth, and corporate strategies to increase competitiveness. Professor Link has served on data and evaluation advisory panels of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Science Foundation, the OECD, and other government agencies such as NASA and the National Institute of Standards and Technology. He has also consulted for numerous European Union and APEC governments on science policy and program evaluation. Among his most recent books are Public Accountability: Evaluating Technology-Based Institutions (with John T. Scott), A Generosity of Spirit: The Early History of Research Triangle Park, and Evaluating Public Sector Research and Development. His scholarly papers have appeared in such journals as the Journal of Political Economy, American Economic Review, Research Policy, STI Review, and the International Journal of Industrial Organization. Professor Link is also the editor of the international Journal of Technology Transfer. MOLLY MACAULEY Molly Macauley is a senior fellow in the Energy and Natural Resources division. She also directs RFF's academic programs, which includes the RFF Wednesday Seminar Series and a number of fellowship and internship programs. Her research interests include: space economics and policy; the economics of new technologies; recycling and solid waste management; urban transportation policy; and the use of economic incentives in environmental regulation. An economist at RFF since 1983 and a long-time analyst of the commercial use of space technology, Dr. Macauley offered her views to Congress in May 1997 on how government can foster burgeoning commercial ventures into satellite remote sensing. She has recently been nominated by the National Research Council to serve as a member of the Committee on an Assessment of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Space Solar Power Investment Strategy. One of her major research projects looks at the ongoing economic, privacy, security, and other implications of American companies selling images photographed by privately owned satellites in outer space. She was also appointed to a two-year term on a National Research Council Study of this topic. She has also been appointed to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Space Science

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Page 293Advisory Committee, and currently serves on the Board of Directors of Women in Aerospace. Dr. Macauley's other research projects are exploring the use of economic incentives to manage space debris; the allocation of scarce energy, water, utilities and telecommunications resources on the space station; the value of geostationary orbit; the value of information, particularly information derived from space-based remote sensing; and the estimation of returns to investing in R&D. Dr. Macauley was named by the National Space Society as one of the top 25 “rising stars” among people doing work related to the U.S. space program. She received her Ph.D. in economics from Johns Hopkins University. ROSALIE RUEGG Since May 2000, Rosalie Ruegg has headed Technology Impact Assessment (TIA) Consulting, a small company that provides economics and business consulting to government and business clients. Over the past decade, she guided the development of the Advanced Technology Program's impact evaluation, as director of the Office of Economic Assessment. Other positions she has held include Senior Staff Advisor to the Associate Director of the National Engineering Laboratory of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Research Economist in NIST's Applied Mathematics Laboratory; Financial Economist with the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System; and Course Designer and Instructor for universities, government agencies, and a private company. She is co-author of a textbook in economics and instructional videos on benefit-cost, life-cycle cost and risk analyses, the author of more than 60 reports, papers, and book chapters, and economics editor of a new energy encyclopedia. Ms. Ruegg graduated with honors from the University of North Carolina, where she was a member of Phi Beta Kappa. She received advanced degrees in economics and business from the University of Maryland, as a Woodrow Wilson Fellow, and from The American University (MBA, specialty in finance). A member of the Federal Senior Executive Service, she received Gold and Silver Medals for excellence from the U.S. Department of Commerce, the highest awards bestowed by the Department. Ms. Ruegg has extensive executive and leadership training.

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