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Appendix B

Biographies of the Committee Members and NRC Staff

Kenneth H. Reckhow (chair) is a professor at Duke University with faculty appointments in the School of the Environment and the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. In addition, he is director of The University of North Carolina Water Resources Research Institute and an adjunct professor in the Department of Civil Engineering at North Carolina State University. He currently serves as president of the National Institutes for Water Resources and is chair of the North Carolina Sedimentation Control Commission. He has published two books and over 80 papers, principally on water quality modeling, monitoring, and pollutant loading analysis. In addition, Dr. Reckhow has taught several short courses on water quality modeling and monitoring design, and he has written eight technical guidance manuals on water quality modeling. He is currently serving, or has previously served, on the editorial boards of Water Resources Research, Water Resources Bulletin, Lake and Reservoir Management, Journal of Environmental Statistics, Urban Ecosystems, and Risk Analysis. He received a B.S. in engineering physics from Cornell University in 1971 and a Ph.D. from Harvard University in environmental systems analysis in 1977. Dr. Reckhow is currently a member of the NRC's Committee to Improve the USGS National Water Quality Assessment Program.

Anthony S. Donigian, Jr., is president and principal engineer for AQUA TERRA Consultants. His expertise is in watershed modeling; nonpoint pollution and water quality modeling; chemical fate, transport, and exposure assessment; and model validation and testing. Mr. Donigian has 30 years of a broad range of experience in the development, testing, and application of modern analytical techniques for the assessment of environmental contamination and water resources planning problems. He is an internationally recognized authority on modeling nonpoint pol-



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Page 105 Appendix B Biographies of the Committee Members and NRC Staff Kenneth H. Reckhow (chair) is a professor at Duke University with faculty appointments in the School of the Environment and the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. In addition, he is director of The University of North Carolina Water Resources Research Institute and an adjunct professor in the Department of Civil Engineering at North Carolina State University. He currently serves as president of the National Institutes for Water Resources and is chair of the North Carolina Sedimentation Control Commission. He has published two books and over 80 papers, principally on water quality modeling, monitoring, and pollutant loading analysis. In addition, Dr. Reckhow has taught several short courses on water quality modeling and monitoring design, and he has written eight technical guidance manuals on water quality modeling. He is currently serving, or has previously served, on the editorial boards of Water Resources Research, Water Resources Bulletin, Lake and Reservoir Management, Journal of Environmental Statistics, Urban Ecosystems, and Risk Analysis. He received a B.S. in engineering physics from Cornell University in 1971 and a Ph.D. from Harvard University in environmental systems analysis in 1977. Dr. Reckhow is currently a member of the NRC's Committee to Improve the USGS National Water Quality Assessment Program. Anthony S. Donigian, Jr., is president and principal engineer for AQUA TERRA Consultants. His expertise is in watershed modeling; nonpoint pollution and water quality modeling; chemical fate, transport, and exposure assessment; and model validation and testing. Mr. Donigian has 30 years of a broad range of experience in the development, testing, and application of modern analytical techniques for the assessment of environmental contamination and water resources planning problems. He is an internationally recognized authority on modeling nonpoint pol-

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Page 106 lution and chemical migration in the environment, primarily for water, soil, and groundwater systems. His recent research and applications studies have concentrated on regional and watershed-scale modeling of nutrients and impacts of management practices, movement of contaminants through the vadose zone, groundwater contamination by pesticides and hazardous wastes, model validation issues and procedures, and the evaluation of control alternatives such as best management practices, conservation tillage, and remedial actions at waste sites. Mr. Donigian received an A.B. in engineering sciences and a B.S. in engineering from Dartmouth College and an M.S. in civil engineering from Stanford University. James R. Karr is a professor of aquatic sciences and zoology and an adjunct professor of environmental engineering, environmental health, and public affairs at the University of Washington, Seattle. He was on the faculties of Purdue University, University of Illinois, and Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; he was also deputy director and acting director at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama. He has taught and done research in tropical forest ecology, ornithology, stream ecology, watershed management, landscape ecology, conservation biology, ecological health, and science and environmental policy. He is a fellow in the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Ornithologists' Union. Dr. Karr has served on the editorial boards of BioScience, Conservation Biology, Ecological Applications, Ecological Monographs, Ecology, Ecosystem Health, Freshwater Biology, Ecological Indicators, and Tropical Ecology. He developed the index of biotic integrity (IBI) to directly evaluate the effects of human actions on the health of living systems. Dr. Karr holds a B.S. in fish and wildlife biology from Iowa State University and an M.S. and Ph.D. in zoology from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Jan Mandrup-Poulsen is an environmental administrator with the Watershed Assessment Section of the Florida Department of Environmental Protection. He is responsible for evaluating surface water quality, surface water/groundwater interactions, and mixing zones, and for determining the Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) allowable to support designated uses. He has coauthored materials on nonpoint source regulation in Florida and permitting guidance documents for point source discharges in Florida with consideration of the TMDL program. He is a frequent speaker on the topics related to the Florida Department of Environmental Protection watershed management approach, TMDLs, and the

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Page 107 Impaired Waters Rule. Mr. Mandrup-Poulsen received his B.S. in atmospheric and oceanic science from the University of Michigan and his M.S. in biological oceanography and M.B.A. from Florida State University. H. Stephen McDonald is a principal with Carollo Engineers. He has 22 years of experience in the areas of wastewater planning, watershed management, wastewater disinfection, biosolids treatment/reuse/ disposal, and chemical and biological wastewater treatment/reuse. He is currently project manager for the development of TMDLs for several watersheds, including the Truckee River from Lake Tahoe to Pyramid Lake and the Calleguas Watershed in California. For the Truckee River, he is developing the Coordinated Monitoring Program and an adaptive management watershed/water quality modeling and stakeholder process to establish TMDLs for nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus) and total dissolved solids (TDS). Mr. McDonald has developed master plans for water and wastewater treatment facilities in many western regions, including Sacramento County, the city of Fresno, CA; and the cities of Reno, Sparks, and Washoe County, NV. He holds a B.S. in biology from Portland State University and a B.S. in chemical engineering from Oregon State University. He has an MBA from California State University in Hayward and is a registered professional engineer in California. Vladimir Novotny is a professor of environmental and water resources engineering at Marquette University and director of the Institute for Urban Environmental Risk Management. He is also president of the consulting firm Aqua Nova International, Ltd. His research has included risk-based urban watershed management integrating water quality and flood-control objectives, development of an adaptive methodology for online computerized modeling and real-time control of wastewater treatment facilities, and development of algorithms for control of urban sewer systems. He developed nationwide manuals on attainment of water quality goals (use attainability analysis) and abatement of winter diffuse pollution by road deicing operations. He is a past chair of an international group of specialists dealing with diffuse pollution and watershed management with the International Water Association. Dr. Novotny received a diploma engineer degree in sanitary engineering and a candidate of science degree in sanitary and water resources from the Technical University of Brno, Czechoslovakia and a Ph.D. in environmental engineering from Vanderbilt University.

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Page 108 Richard A. Smith joined the Water Resources Division of the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) in 1975 and began working with a small research team on statistical methods in water quality and their applications to the extensive and diverse water quality monitoring records maintained by the USGS. Throughout the 1980s, his research dealt with patterns of change in the nation's water quality and with statistical analysis of data collected from the more than 400 stream and river monitoring stations in the Survey's NASQAN program. In the early 1990s he began to investigate the possibility of using the rapidly advancing technology of GIS to enable the use of monitoring data in making statistically based predictions of water quality in unmonitored waters. For more than a decade he has also been very interested in the question of the adequacy of the nation's monitoring programs. He recently served on a panel of scientists charged with making recommendations for a comprehensive monitoring plan for the drinking-water supply watersheds serving New York City. Dr. Smith received his B.S. and M.S. in biology from the University of Richmond and his Ph.D. in environmental engineering from Johns Hopkins University. Chris O. Yoder is manager of the Ecological Assessment Section of the State of Ohio Environmental Protection Agency. His current responsibilities include ecological evaluation of Ohio's surface water resources including streams, rivers, lakes, and wetlands; development of ambient biological, physical, and chemical assessment methods, indicators, and criteria for rivers, streams, inland lakes, wetlands, Lake Erie, and the Ohio River; reporting on the condition of Ohio surface water resources on a local, regional, and statewide scale; and development of environmental indicators for the surface water program. Previously he was a principal investigator of a cooperative agreement with the U.S. EPA Office of Water for developing approaches to implementing bioassessments and biological criteria within state and federal water quality management programs. Mr. Yoder received a B.S. in agriculture from Ohio State University and his M.A. in zoology from DePauw University. NRC Staff Leonard Shabman is a professor in the Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics at the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University and director of the Virginia Water Resources Research Center. He earned his Ph.D. in resource and environmental economics from

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Page 109 Cornell University. His research interests include water supply, water quality, and flood hazard management; fishery management; and the role of economists in public policy formulation. Dr. Shabman was a member of the NRC's Committee on Watershed Management, Committee on USGS Water Resources Research, Committee on Flood Control Alternatives in the American River Basin, and the Committee on Restoration of Aquatic Ecosystems: Science, Technology, and Public Policy. Laura J. Ehlers is a senior staff officer for the Water Science and Technology Board of the National Research Council. Since joining the NRC in 1997, she has served as study director for seven committees, including the Committee to Review the New York City Watershed Management Strategy, the Committee on Riparian Zone Functioning and Strategies for Management, and the Committee on Bioavailability of Contaminants in Soils and Sediment. She received her B.S. from the California Institute of Technology, majoring in biology and engineering and applied science. She earned both an M.S.E. and a Ph.D. in environmental engineering at the Johns Hopkins University. Her dissertation, entitled RP4 Plasmid Transfer Among Strains of Pseudomonas in a Biofilm, was awarded the 1998 Parsons Engineering/Association of Environmental Engineering Professors award for best doctoral thesis.