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Appendix B

Biographical Sketches ofCommittee Members

PETER B. LEDERMAN (Chair), retired executive director of the Hazardous Substances Management Research Center and executive director of the Office of Intellectual Property, is a research professor of chemical engineering and environmental policy at the New Jersey Institute of Technology. He received his Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the University of Michigan. Dr. Lederman has 47 years of experience in all facets of environmental management, control, and policy development; hazardous substance treatment and management; and process engineering; he has more than 18 years of experience as an educator. He is a registered professional engineer and a diplomate of the American Academy of Environmental Engineers. Dr. Lederman has worked on environmental policy at the federal and state levels and has served on several National Research Council committees, most recently the Committee on Decontamination and Decommissioning of Gaseous Diffusion Plants.

CHARLES I. MCGINNIS (Vice Chair) has an M.Engr. from Texas A&M University. After retiring from the U.S. Army as a major general and former director of civil works for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, he served in senior positions at the Construction Industry Institute in Austin, Texas. He was also director of engineering and construction for the Panama Canal Company and was subsequently vice president of the company and lieutenant governor of the Canal Zone. As director of civil works for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, he was responsible for a $3 billion per year budget for the planning, design, construction, operation, and maintenance of public works nationwide. He is a registered professional engineer in Texas and Missouri.

DAVID H. ARCHER, a member of the National Academy of Engineering, has a Ph.D. in chemical engineering and mathematics from the University of Delaware. He is a retired consulting engineer with the Westinghouse Electric Company and is currently adjunct professor at Carnegie Mellon University. Dr. Archer has worked in both industry (at Westinghouse as an engineer, supervising engineer, department manager, and consulting engineer) and academia (at the University of Delaware and Carnegie Mellon University for almost 10 years). He has considerable experience in research and management related to chemical engineering, as well as experience with combustion and plant management.

PIERO M. ARMENANTE has a Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the University of Virginia and is currently Distinguished Professor of Chemical Engineering at the New Jersey Institute of Technology and director of the Northeast Hazardous Substance Research Center, a seven-university center funded by the Environmental Protection Agency. Dr. Armenante's research interests include multiphase mixing in agitated systems, the biological treatment of hazardous waste, industrial sterilization processes, and biomedical engineering. He has an extensive list of peer-reviewed and other publications and has administered numerous grants, studies, and projects.



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Page 39 Appendix B Biographical Sketches ofCommittee Members PETER B. LEDERMAN (Chair), retired executive director of the Hazardous Substances Management Research Center and executive director of the Office of Intellectual Property, is a research professor of chemical engineering and environmental policy at the New Jersey Institute of Technology. He received his Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the University of Michigan. Dr. Lederman has 47 years of experience in all facets of environmental management, control, and policy development; hazardous substance treatment and management; and process engineering; he has more than 18 years of experience as an educator. He is a registered professional engineer and a diplomate of the American Academy of Environmental Engineers. Dr. Lederman has worked on environmental policy at the federal and state levels and has served on several National Research Council committees, most recently the Committee on Decontamination and Decommissioning of Gaseous Diffusion Plants. CHARLES I. MCGINNIS (Vice Chair) has an M.Engr. from Texas A&M University. After retiring from the U.S. Army as a major general and former director of civil works for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, he served in senior positions at the Construction Industry Institute in Austin, Texas. He was also director of engineering and construction for the Panama Canal Company and was subsequently vice president of the company and lieutenant governor of the Canal Zone. As director of civil works for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, he was responsible for a $3 billion per year budget for the planning, design, construction, operation, and maintenance of public works nationwide. He is a registered professional engineer in Texas and Missouri. DAVID H. ARCHER, a member of the National Academy of Engineering, has a Ph.D. in chemical engineering and mathematics from the University of Delaware. He is a retired consulting engineer with the Westinghouse Electric Company and is currently adjunct professor at Carnegie Mellon University. Dr. Archer has worked in both industry (at Westinghouse as an engineer, supervising engineer, department manager, and consulting engineer) and academia (at the University of Delaware and Carnegie Mellon University for almost 10 years). He has considerable experience in research and management related to chemical engineering, as well as experience with combustion and plant management. PIERO M. ARMENANTE has a Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the University of Virginia and is currently Distinguished Professor of Chemical Engineering at the New Jersey Institute of Technology and director of the Northeast Hazardous Substance Research Center, a seven-university center funded by the Environmental Protection Agency. Dr. Armenante's research interests include multiphase mixing in agitated systems, the biological treatment of hazardous waste, industrial sterilization processes, and biomedical engineering. He has an extensive list of peer-reviewed and other publications and has administered numerous grants, studies, and projects.

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Page 40 JERRY L.R. CHANDLER has a Ph.D. in biochemistry from Oklahoma State University and has done extensive postgraduate study in mathematics. He is currently a research professor at the Krasnow Institute for Advanced Study at George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia. Earlier in his long career, Dr. Chandler served with the U.S. Public Health Service, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), the Food and Drug Administration, and the National Cancer Institute Epidemiology Program. More recently, he was a neuropharmacologist in the Epilepsy Branch of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke of the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Chandler is a founding member and president of the Washington Evolutionary Systems Society and has published extensively on using mathematical category theory to understand the origins of disease. He previously served as a NIOSH observer with the National Academy of Sciences/National Research Council Panel on Risk Assessment. JOHN J. COSTOLNICK graduated from Northwestern University with an M.S. in chemical engineering and is a registered professional engineer. He retired as vice president of engineering at Exxon Chemical Company, where he worked for more than 35 years in positions of increasing responsibility, from manufacturing manager and plant manager to vice president for agricultural chemicals and vice president for basic chemical technology. Mr. Costolnick's areas of expertise are chemical operations and manufacturing. FRANK P. CRIMI is a part-time consultant and retired vice president of Lockheed Martin Advanced Environmental Systems Company. He has a B.S. in mechanical engineering from Ohio University and has done graduate studies in mechanical engineering at Union College in Schenectady, New York. Mr. Crimi was appointed to the National Research Council Committee on Decontamination and Decommissioning of Uranium Enrichment Facilities and has firsthand knowledge and experience with radioactive and hazardous-waste treatment and disposal technologies. J. ROBERT GIBSON is the assistant director of the Haskell Laboratory, E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company, and an adjunct associate professor of marine studies at the University of Delaware. Since receiving his Ph.D. in physiology from Mississippi State University, Dr. Gibson has specialized in toxicology. He is certified by the American Board of Toxicology and has written numerous publications. MICHAEL R. GREENBERG is a professor in the Department of Urban Studies and Community Health at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, and an adjunct professor of environmental and community medicine at the Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. His principal research and teaching interests include urbanization, industrialization, and environmental health policy. Dr. Greenberg holds a B.A. in mathematics and history, an M.A. in urban geography, and a Ph.D. in environmental and medical geography. DEBORAH L. GRUBBE graduated from Purdue University with a B.S. in chemical engineering and received a Winston Churchill Fellowship to attend Cambridge University in England, where she received a Certificate of Postgraduate Study in chemical engineering. She is a registered professional engineer and engineer of record for DuPont, where she is currently corporate director for safety and health. Previously, she was operations and engineering director for DuPont Nonwovens, where she was responsible for manufacturing, engineering, safety, environmental systems, and information systems. She is a board member of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers Engineering and Construction Contracting Division and has led several committees of the Construction Industry Institute. Her areas of expertise are safety, chemical manufacturing technology, and project management and execution. DAVID A. HOECKE, who graduated from Cooper Union with a B.S.M.E., is currently president and chief executive officer of Enercon Systems, Inc. His expertise is in the fields of waste combustion, pyrolysis, heat transfer, and gas cleaning. In 1960, he began working for Midland-Ross Corporation as a project engineer, becoming its chief engineer for incineration by 1972. At that time, he founded his own company, where he has been responsible for the design and construction of numerous combustion systems, including solid waste incinerators, thermal oxidizers, heat recovery systems, and gas-to-air heat exchangers. DAVID H. JOHNSON graduated from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology with an Sc.D. in nuclear engineering. Currently senior vice president and chief scientist of EQE International, Inc., Dr. Johnson has

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Page 41 more than 20 years of experience in risk-based analysis for industry and government applications. His area of expertise is probabilistic risk assessments, including probabilistic modeling and investigation of the impacts of industrial projects. CHARLES E. KOLB is president and chief executive officer of Aerodyne Research, Inc. Since 1971, his principal research interests at Aerodyne have included atmospheric and environmental chemistry, combustion chemistry, materials chemistry, and the chemical physics of rocket and aircraft exhaust plumes. He has served on several National Aeronautics and Space Administration panels dealing with atmospheric chemistry and global change, as well as on five National Research Council committees and boards dealing with environmental issues. He served as vice chair of the Stockpile Committee from mid-1997 to mid-2000. From 1996 to 1999, he was atmospheric sciences editor for Geophysical Research Letters. In 1997, he received the Award for Creative Advances in Environmental Science and Technology from the American Chemical Society. GARY L. LAGE is the founding principal of ToxiLogics, Inc., where he is responsible for incorporating current data on the toxicology of chemicals and modern risk assessment into scientific decisions. For 20 years, he was an educator at the University of Kansas, the University of Wisconsin, and the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and Science, where he taught pharmacology and toxicology. Dr. Lage was project director, vice president, and practice leader for human health practice at the Roy F. Weston Company for four years and a principal in the human health practice area with ENVIRON Corporation. He is a diplomate of the American Board of Toxicology and has a Ph.D. in pharmacology from the University of Iowa. JAMES F. MATHIS, a member of the National Academy of Engineering, graduated from the University of Wisconsin with a Ph.D. in chemical engineering. Dr. Mathis was vice president of science and technology for Exxon Corporation, where he was responsible for worldwide research and development programs, and was chair of the New Jersey Commission on Science and Technology until his retirement in 1997. Dr. Mathis's expertise is in research and development and chemical engineering. FREDERICK G. POHLAND, a member of the National Academy of Engineering, graduated from Purdue University with a Ph.D. in environmental engineering and is currently professor and Edward R. Weidlein Chair of Environmental Engineering at the University of Pittsburgh, as well as director of the Engineering Center for Environment and Energy and codirector of the Groundwater Remediation Technologies Analysis Center. He is a registered professional engineer and a diplomate environmental engineer and has taught and written extensively on solid and hazardous waste management, environmental impact assessment, and innovative technologies for waste minimization, treatment, and environmental remediation. Dr. Pohland has expertise in minimizing the impacts of hazardous waste on workers, the public, and the environment. ROBERT B. PUYEAR graduated from Missouri School of Mines and Metallurgy with a B.S. in chemical engineering and from Purdue University with an M.S. in industrial administration. He is currently a consultant specializing in corrosion prevention and control, failure analysis, and materials selection. Mr. Puyear worked for Union Carbide for 16 years developing high-performance materials for chemical and aerospace applications and for Monsanto for 21 years as a corrosion specialist, where he managed the Mechanical and Materials Engineering Section. He is an expert in materials engineering and in the evaluation of materials of construction. CHARLES F. REINHARDT, who has an M.D. from Indiana University School of Medicine and an M.Sc. in occupational medicine from Ohio State University School of Medicine, retired after more than 30 years with the DuPont Company, where he was a physiologist, then chief of the physiology section, and then research manager for environmental sciences. In 1971 he became assistant director of the laboratory and in 1976 was named its director, a position he held until his retirement in 1996. Dr. Reinhardt has served on numerous National Research Council panels and committees, including the Committee on Toxicology. His areas of expertise are occupational medicine and toxicology. KENNETH F. REINSCHMIDT, a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a graduate of

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Page 42 the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) with a Ph.D. in engineering, is currently a consultant specializing in management of engineering, design, and construction projects; project and technology risk analysis; and project simulation and modeling. For 21 years he worked at Stone & Webster, Inc., from which he retired as senior vice president in 1996. He also taught civil engineering at MIT for 10 years. Dr. Reinschmidt's expertise is in project design, development, and construction. W. LEIGH SHORT earned his Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the University of Michigan. He recently retired as a principal and vice president of URS Greiner Woodward-Clyde, where he was responsible for management and business development associated with the company's hazardous waste services in Wayne, New Jersey. Dr. Short has expertise in air pollution, chemical process engineering, hazardous waste services, feasibility studies, site remediation, and project management. He has taught courses in control technologies, both to graduate students and as a part of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) national training programs. He has also served as chairman of the EPA's NOx Control Technology Review Panel. JEFFREY I. STEINFELD graduated from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology with a B.S. in chemistry and from Harvard University with a Ph.D. in physical chemistry and is currently a professor of chemistry at MIT, where he has taught for almost 35 years. Dr. Steinfeld's expertise is in high-sensitivity monitoring techniques, pollution prevention, and environmental research and education, as well as in bringing scientific knowledge into environmental decision making via stakeholder involvement. CHADWICK A. TOLMAN received his Ph.D. in physical chemistry from the University of California at Berkeley and is currently a program officer in the organic and macromolecular chemistry program in the Division of Chemistry of the National Science Foundation. He has extensive experience and expertise in chemistry and chemical process development. Dr. Tolman spent 31 years in Central Research at the DuPont Experimental Station. His work has spanned a broad range of subjects, from hydrocarbon oxidation and organometallic chemistry to the destruction of toxic organic compounds in wastewater. WILLIAM TUMAS graduated from Ithaca College with a B.A. in chemistry and earned his Ph.D. in organic chemistry from Stanford University. After conducting postdoctoral research in organometallic chemistry at the California Institute of Technology as a National Institutes of Health and Chaim Weizman Postdoctoral Fellow, he worked for six years at DuPont Central Research and Development. Since 1993, Dr. Tumas has been at Los Alamos National Laboratory, where he is currently group leader of the Actinide, Catalysis, and Separations Chemistry Group in the Chemistry Division. His experience with the National Research Council includes service as a member of the Panel on Review and Evaluation of Alternative Chemical Demilitarization Technologies (1995–1996). His research interests include catalysis, supercritical fluids, environmental chemistry, and waste treatment technology assessment.