Page 51

Appendix Workshop Agenda

School Completion in Standards-Based Reform: Facts and Strategies

July 17-18, 2000

Washington, DC

Monday, July 17

8:00

Continental breakfast

8:30

Welcome and Overview of Workshop Goals

Ulric Neisser, Cornell University

William Trent, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

(Committee Cochairs)

8:45

Historical Perspective

Brief review of trends in graduation during the century and public policy history of dropping out as a visible concern for policymakers and practitioners.

Sherman Dorn, University of South Florida

Respondent: Jay Heubert, Teachers College, Columbia University

Questions and Discussion



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 51
Page 51 Appendix Workshop Agenda School Completion in Standards-Based Reform: Facts and Strategies July 17-18, 2000 Washington, DC Monday, July 17 8:00 Continental breakfast 8:30 Welcome and Overview of Workshop Goals Ulric Neisser, Cornell University William Trent, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign (Committee Cochairs) 8:45 Historical Perspective Brief review of trends in graduation during the century and public policy history of dropping out as a visible concern for policymakers and practitioners. Sherman Dorn, University of South Florida Respondent: Jay Heubert, Teachers College, Columbia University Questions and Discussion

OCR for page 51
Page 52 10:00 Difficulties in Calculating Dropout Rates Various ways of calculating the rates can yield results that appear different, even contradictory. Both clarification of current data and guidance in understanding these complexities for the interested nonstatistician are needed. • What data are collected and how are they presented? • What are the proper interpretations of dropout rates as currently reported in different jurisdictions? • Why are differing data reported for the same cohorts and locales? • What are the most accurate and useful representations of dropout statistics? Phillip Kaufman, Director, Statistical Analysis and Data Design, MPR Associates Respondent: Robert Hauser, University of Wisconsin, Madison Questions and Discussion 11:00 Break 11:15 Who is Dropping Out and Why? Which factors seem to account for the greatest variation, and what is known about how these factors influence the decision to drop out? A look at variations by cultural background and ethnicity and other factors. Russell Rumberger, University of California, Santa Barbara Respondent: Herbert Walberg, University of Illinois Questions and Discussion 12:30 Lunch

OCR for page 51
Page 53 1:00 One State's Experience: Texas A Look at Reforms and Statistics in Texas Anne Smisko, Texas Education Agency Respondent: Diana Lam, Providence School Department Legislated School Reform Via High-Stakes Testing: The Case of Pending Anti-Social Promotion Legislation in Texas and Its Likely Adverse Impact on Racial/Ethnic Minority Students Richard Valencia, University of Texas Respondent: William Trent 2:15 Stakes for Students: Impacts on Schooling, Learning, and Earning A look at the effects of acquisition of a high-school diploma or GED certification on future schooling, employment opportunities, and earning power. Ferran Mañe, Rovira I Virgili University Respondent: Henry Levin, Teachers College, Columbia University Questions and Discussion 3:30 Break 3:45 Tracking Students' Progress Through School What kinds of indicators of students' progress through school might be tracked as a way of monitoring the effects of high-stakes tests on school completion? A look at value-added measures as a means of identifying schools and students that are struggling.

OCR for page 51
Page 54 Robert Meyer, University of Chicago Respondent: Ulric Neisser Questions and Discussion 5:00 Adjourn Tuesday, July 18 8:30 What's Being Done to Prevent Students From Dropping Out? A look at examples of successful efforts to target the needs of students at high risk for dropping out. Mark Dynarski, Mathematica Policy Research Respondent: Judith Johnson, Department of Education 9:30 Discussion of Preliminary Questions Discussants' responses to questions and workshop presentations David Grissmer, RAND Robert Hauser, University of Wisconsin, Madison Aaron Pallas, Michigan State University 10:30 Break 10:45 General Discussion Moderators: Ulric Neisser, William Trent 11:45 Concluding Remarks 12:00 Adjourn