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Appendix: Workshop Materials

WORKSHOP AGENDA

December 13, 2000

8:00 a.m. – 8:30 a.m.

Registration and Continental Breakfast

8:30 a.m. – 8:45 a.m.

Welcome, Introductions, and Purpose of the Workshop

Richard Thornburgh, Committee and Workshop Chair

8:45 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.

Nontechnical Strategies That Can Be Used To Protect Children on the Internet: What are the Roles of Policies, Parents, Schools, Libraries, and Communities

Linda Roberts, Director, Office of Educational Technology and Senior Adviser to the Secretary, U.S. Department of Education

Anne Thompson, Program Commissioner, National PTA

Q&A and General Discussion

  • How does one define nontechnical strategies for protecting kids from inappropriate material on the Internet?



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Page 85 Appendix: Workshop Materials WORKSHOP AGENDA December 13, 2000 8:00 a.m. – 8:30 a.m. Registration and Continental Breakfast 8:30 a.m. – 8:45 a.m. Welcome, Introductions, and Purpose of the Workshop Richard Thornburgh, Committee and Workshop Chair 8:45 a.m. – 9:30 a.m. Nontechnical Strategies That Can Be Used To Protect Children on the Internet: What are the Roles of Policies, Parents, Schools, Libraries, and Communities Linda Roberts, Director, Office of Educational Technology and Senior Adviser to the Secretary, U.S. Department of Education Anne Thompson, Program Commissioner, National PTA Q&A and General Discussion How does one define nontechnical strategies for protecting kids from inappropriate material on the Internet?

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Page 86 What nontechnical approaches are used in the home, classroom, and community settings? What is the role of parents in making nontechnical strategies effective, and what do parents need? How effective have current policies been in encouraging schools and communities to develop nontechnical strategies? 9:30 a.m. – 9:45 a.m. Short Break 9:45 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. An Extended Panel on Bringing Developmental Considerations to Bear on the Impact of Inappropriate Material on the Internet Moderator/Discussant: Sandra Calvert, Committee Member and Professor of Psychology, Georgetown University Format Note: Questions and open discussion will be held until after the second part of the panel. Part I: Effects of Exposure to Pornographic and Other Inappropriate Material on the Internet Jane Brown, Professor, School of Journalism and Mass Communications, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Joanne Cantor, Professor, University of Wisconsin-Madison Ed Donnerstein, Dean and Professor, Department of Communication, University of California-Santa Barbara What types of inappropriate material do young people encounter, and how do they come in contact with it? What is the potential impact on children of viewing sexually explicit and other forms of inappropriate material in the media? Is impact dependent only on the type of material or also on the source (e.g., static image on the Internet, picture from a magazine, active images from television)? What are the limits of this research, and to what extent can we make comparisons among the effects of viewing different types of inappropriate material (e.g., sexually explicit vs. violent vs. hate speech)?

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Page 87 Part II: Developmental Considerations for Determining Appropriate Internet Use Guidelines for Children and Adolescents Patricia Greenfield, Professor, Department of Psychology, University of California at Los Angeles James Youniss, Professor, Life Cycle Institute, Catholic University of America Dorothy Singer, Senior Research Scientist, Department of Psychology, Yale University, and Co-director, Yale University Family Television Research and Consultation Center How are emotional, cognitive, social, and moral development affected by the media landscape created by children's access and use of the Internet? What types of material may be harmful according to children's growth and developmental needs, and how may harmful effects change with age and developmental milestone? How do parents and educators balance giving young people the responsibility of exploring the Internet with protecting them from material that may be disturbing? How should developmental issues shape nontechnical strategies to protect kids from inappropriate material, and what nontechnical strategies will most benefit children's development? 12:00 p.m. – 12:45 p.m. Quick Lunch 12:45 p.m. – 1:45 p.m. Push and Pull on the Internet: Children's Use and Experiences Don Roberts, Thomas More Storke Professor, Department of Communications, Stanford University Sarah Keller, Assistant Professor, Health Communication, Department of Communication, Emerson College Moderator/Discussant: Janet Schofleld, Committee Member, Professor of Psychology and Senior Scientist at the Learning Research and Development Center, University of Pittsburgh

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Page 88 Q&A and General Discussion How are children using the Internet, in what settings are children logging on, and are there differential patterns of use according to age, gender, and ethnicity? What are children's experiences while online, both positive and negative? How are children pulled into material that they might not otherwise view, and what effect might this have? How are young people driving their experiences on the Internet, and how can young people be encouraged to stay in charge of their online experiences? 1:45 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. Short Break 2:00 p.m. – 3:45 p.m. Innovative Approaches and Existing Efforts to Use NonTechnological Strategies to Protect Children on the Internet Laurie Lipper, Director, The Children's Partnership Kathy Boguszewski, Instructional Technology Consultant, Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction Mary Dempsey, Commissioner, Chicago Public Library Nancy Willard, Director, Responsible Netizen Research, Center for Advanced Technology in Education, University of Oregon Eileen Faucette, Founder and Coordinator, PTA Live Online Moderator/Discussant: Winnie Wechsler, Committee Member Q&A and General Discussion What are some of the nontechnological strategies that might be used by educators, librarians, parents, and local communities to ensure children's safe and appropriate use of the Internet? What types of inappropriate material do these strategies address, and how do they protect against the potential harm this material might cause?

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Page 89 Who has been responsible for implementing and monitoring these approaches? How can these approaches be tailored to different venues (e.g., home, school, library)? 3:45 p.m. – 4:45 p.m. Bridging Research, Policy, and Practice Ellen Wartella, Dean and Professor, College of Communication, University of Texas-Austin Betty Chemers, Deputy Administrator, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Q&A and General Discussion What research is needed to develop new nontechnical strategies for protecting children from inappropriate material on the Internet? Are regulations needed to protect children on the Internet, and what policies might encourage children to use the Internet in safe and appropriate ways? How are and how should nonprofit organizations, educational institutions, government agencies, and parents work together to create a safe environment for kids to use the Internet? How should we be thinking about linking research, policy, and practice? 4:45 p.m. Concluding Remarks Richard Thornburgh, Committee and Workshop Chair 5:00 p.m. Adjourn

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Page 90 PRESENTERS Kathy Boguszewski, Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, Madison Jane Brown, School of Journalism and Mass Communication, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill Joanne Cantor, University of Wisconsin-Madison Betty Chemers, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, DC Mary Dempsey, Chicago Public Library Ed Donnerstein, Department of Communication, University of California-Santa Barbara Eileen Faucette, PTA Live Online, Augusta, GA Patricia Greenfield, Department of Psychology, University of CaliforniaLos Angeles Sarah Keller, Department of Communication, Emerson College Laurie Lipper, The Children's Partnership, Washington, DC Donald Roberts, Department of Communication, Stanford University Linda Roberts, Office of Educational Technology, U.S. Department of Education, Washington, DC Dorothy Singer, Yale University Family Television Research and Consultation Center, Yale University Anne Thompson, National PTA, Miami, FL Ellen Wartella, College of Communication, University of Texas at Austin Nancy Willard, Center for Advanced Technology in Education, University of Oregon James Youniss, Life Cycle Institute, Catholic University