FRANKLIN ASBURY LONG

July 27, 1910–February 8, 1999

BY FRED W. MCLAFFERTY, BARRY K. CARPENTER, AND JERROLD MEINWALD

Frank Long’s research made fundamental, unique contributions to a surprising variety of important scientific subjects. He applied his extensive background and deep intuition in physical chemistry, in combination with his creative instrumentation skills and keen awareness of new experimental techniques, to yield important discoveries in other research areas. These included basic reaction mechanisms of organic molecules in solution, unimolecular dissociation of gaseous ions, and diffusion of organic vapors through polymer films.

These broad interests and his outgoing personality also led him into leadership positions in academe, government, industry, and public affairs. The cause of international arms reduction was especially close to his heart. He made friends readily, took on unpopular causes willingly, and fulfilled commitments promptly and with apparent ease. He was department chair, vice-president, and trustee at Cornell, on the President’s Science Advisory Committee for Presidents Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Johnson, assistant director of the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, co-chair of the U.S. Pugwash Steering Committee, and a director of several large corporations. Probably his most publicized ap-



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