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Biographical Information

SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, AND LAW PANEL

DONALD KENNEDY, Cochair, (NAS/IOM), Ph.D. (biology), Harvard, Bing Professor of Environmental Studies and co-director, Center for Environmental Science and Policy, Institute for International Studies, Stanford University. He is President Emeritus of Stanford University. He serves as Editor-in-Chief, Science. Previously, he served as Commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. He was a member of the NAS planning committee that initiated the 1997 Academy Symposium on Science, Technology, and Law.

RICHARD A. MERRILL, Cochair, (IOM), L.L.B., Columbia University School of Law, Daniel Caplin Professor of Law and Sullivan & Cromwell Research Professor of Law at the University of Virginia Law School. From 1975-1977 he served as Chief Counsel to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. He was Dean of the University of Virginia Law School from 1980 to 1988. Since 1991, he has been special counsel to Covington & Burling. He was a member of the NAS planning committee that initiated the 1997 Academy Symposium on Science, Technology, and Law.

FREDERICK R. ANDERSON, J.D., Harvard Law School, heads the Energy, Environment, and Natural Resources Practice Group at Cadwalader, Wickersham & Taft in Washington, D.C. He is a former Dean of the Washington College of Law at American University. He was a member of the



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Page 22 Biographical Information SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, AND LAW PANEL DONALD KENNEDY, Cochair, (NAS/IOM), Ph.D. (biology), Harvard, Bing Professor of Environmental Studies and co-director, Center for Environmental Science and Policy, Institute for International Studies, Stanford University. He is President Emeritus of Stanford University. He serves as Editor-in-Chief, Science. Previously, he served as Commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. He was a member of the NAS planning committee that initiated the 1997 Academy Symposium on Science, Technology, and Law. RICHARD A. MERRILL, Cochair, (IOM), L.L.B., Columbia University School of Law, Daniel Caplin Professor of Law and Sullivan & Cromwell Research Professor of Law at the University of Virginia Law School. From 1975-1977 he served as Chief Counsel to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. He was Dean of the University of Virginia Law School from 1980 to 1988. Since 1991, he has been special counsel to Covington & Burling. He was a member of the NAS planning committee that initiated the 1997 Academy Symposium on Science, Technology, and Law. FREDERICK R. ANDERSON, J.D., Harvard Law School, heads the Energy, Environment, and Natural Resources Practice Group at Cadwalader, Wickersham & Taft in Washington, D.C. He is a former Dean of the Washington College of Law at American University. He was a member of the

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Page 23 NAS planning committee that initiated the 1997 Academy Symposium on Science, Technology, and Law. Among his many publications is “Science Advocacy and Scientific Due Process,” Issues in Science and Technology, Summer 2000, pp. 71-76. MARGARET A. BERGER, J.D., Columbia University, Suzanne J. and Norman Miles Professor of Law at Brooklyn Law School in Brooklyn, New York. She has written extensively on science and law, and in particular on three key Supreme Court cases (Daubert, Joiner, Kumho) dealing with evidence. She is the co-author of Weinstein's Evidence. PAUL D. CARRINGTON, L.L.B., Harvard, Harry R. Chadwick Senior Professor at Duke University Law School. He is the former Dean of Duke's Law School and has taught and published extensively on civil procedures. He was Reporter to the Advisory Committee on Civil Rules of the Judicial Conference of the United States. He also established the Private Adjudication Center that developed a Registry of Independent Scientists to provide disinterested advice to lawyers and judges on scientific issues that are the subject of legal disputes. JOE S. CECIL, Ph.D., psychology, and J.D., Northwestern University, Project Director, Program on Scientific and Technical Evidence, Division of Research, Federal Judicial Center, Washington, D.C. He is responsible for judicial education and training in the area of scientific and technical evidence and the lead staff of the Federal Judicial Center's Scientific Evidence Manual, which is the primary source book on evidence for federal judges. JOEL E. COHEN, (NAS), Dr.P.H., population sciences and tropical public health, and Ph.D., applied mathematics, Harvard, Abby Rockefeller Mauze Professor and Head, Laboratory of Populations, The Rockefeller University and Professor of Populations, Columbia University, in New York City. From 1991-1995, Dr. Cohen served as a U.S. Federal Court-appointed neutral expert on projections of asbestos-related claims associated with the Manville Personal Injury Settlement Trust. In addition, he has served as a Special Master in silicone gel breast implant products liability. REBECCA S. EISENBERG, J.D., Professor of Law at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan. She teaches courses in intellectual property and torts and has taught on legal regulation of science and on legal issues associated with the Human Genome Project.

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Page 24 DAVID L. GOODSTEIN, Ph.D., physics, University of Washington, Vice Provost and Professor of Physics and Applied Physics, and Frank J. Gilloon Distinguished Teaching and Service Professor at the California Institute of Technology. His book, States of Matter, helped launch a new discipline, condensed matter physics. In recent years, he has been particularly interested in societal issues that affect science as a profession. BARBARA S. HULKA, (IOM), M.D., Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons, Kenan Professor, Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Dr. Hulka's current research activities are in the field of cancer epidemiology—breast, uterine and prostate—and the application of biological markers. Dr. Hulka is working on the development of a process for incorporating scientific data into the judicial system. DANIEL J. KEVLES, Ph.D., history, Princeton, Koepfli Professor of Humanities and directs the Program in Science, Ethics, and Public Policy at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, California. He has written extensively on issues regarding science and society including genetics, patenting, and research misconduct. DAVID KORN, (IOM), M.D., Harvard, Senior Vice President for Biomedical and Health Sciences Research, Association of American Medical Colleges, Washington, D.C. Previously, he served as Dean, Stanford University School of Medicine. ERIC S. LANDER, (NAS/IOM), D.Phil., mathematics, Oxford University, Member, Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Professor of Biology, MIT, Director, Whitehead Institute/MIT Center for Genome Research, and Geneticist, Massachusetts General Hospital, Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He is a geneticist, molecular biologist and a mathematician, with research interests in human genetics, mouse genetics, population genetics, and computational and mathematical methods in biology. He has taught in the area of management and economics. Dr. Lander is a member of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences and has written about DNA fingerprinting and other issues of science and law. PATRICK A. MALONE, J.D., Yale Law School, partner, Stein, Mitchell & Mezines in Washington, D.C. Mr. Malone, a former medical journalist, represents plaintiffs in medical malpractice and product liability lawsuits. He is a member of the Association of Trial Lawyers of America and Trial Lawyers for Public Justice.

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Page 25 RICHARD A. MESERVE, Ph.D., applied physics, Stanford, J.D., Harvard, Chairman, Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Prior to his appointment he was a partner with the Washington, D.C. firm Covington and Burling, where he represented a number of corporate and non-profit organizations. He was a member of the NAS planning committee that initiated the 1997 Academy Symposium on Science, Technology, and Law. He wrote the amicus briefs on behalf of the National Academy of Engineering in the Kumho case and on behalf of the National Academy of Sciences in the Daubert case. These landmark cases established the basis for admitting expert testimony into court. ALAN B. MORRISON, L.L.B., Harvard Law School, Director, Public Citizen Litigation Group, Washington, D.C. Public Citizen, Inc., is a nonprofit citizen research, lobbying and litigation organization founded in 1971 by Ralph Nader. HARRY J. PEARCE, J.D., Northwestern University School of Law, is Chairman of Hughes Electronics Corporation, a subsidiary of General Motors Corporation in El Segundo, California. He previously served General Motors as Vice Chairman and prior to that as General Counsel. Mr. Pearce has been admitted to the U.S. Supreme Court, U.S. Court of Military Appeals, Eight Circuit Court of Appeals, various U.S. District Courts and State District Courts and the Michigan Supreme Court. HENRY PETROSKI, (NAE), Ph.D., University of Illinois, A.S. Vesic Professor of Civil Engineering and Professor of History, Duke University in Durham, North Carolina. He has written extensively on the nature of engineering and design, as well as on engineering and law issues. Most recently, he authored a chapter on engineering practice for the Federal Judicial Center's evidence project. CHANNING R. ROBERTSON, Ph.D., Chemical Engineering, Ruth G. and William K. Bowes Professor, School of Engineering, and Professor, Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University. Dr. Robertson conducted research on several products about which there was extensive litigation and in which he served as an expert witness. PAMELA ANN RYMER, L.L.B., Stanford, Circuit Judge, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, Pasadena, California. She was appointed in 1989 by President George Bush. Judge Rymer currently serves as the Chair of the AAAS Court-Appointed Scientific Experts Demonstration Project.

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Page 26 STAFF OF THE SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, AND LAW PROGRAM ANNE-MARIE MAZZA, Director. Dr. Mazza joined The National Academies in 1995. She served as Senior Program Officer with both the Committee on Science, Engineering and Public Policy and the Government-University-Industry Research Roundtable. From 1999-2000, she divided her time between the STL Program and the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, where she chaired an interagency working group on the government-university research partnership. She received a Ph.D. in Public Policy from The George Washington University. SUSIE BACHTEL, Staff Associate. Ms. Bachtel became a Staff Associate of The National Academies in 1998. She previously was Special Assistant to the Director, The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, and prior to that Executive Assistant to the Director of the U.S. Office of Technology Assessment. Ms. Bachtel received a B.A. in Social Sciences from The Ohio State University. MAARIKA LIIVAK served in the Science, Technology, and Law Program as a Christine Mizrayan Intern. After finishing her B.A. in biochemistry from Rutgers University, she undertook her graduate studies with the support of a National Science Foundation Pre-Doctoral Fellowship at Yale University, where she earned an M.S. in genetics. She will begin law school at Yale in the fall. She eventually would like to combine her training in genetics with a legal career. DUNCAN BROWN is a Washington, D.C.-based science writer and editorial consultant who works in fields related to energy, the environment, defense, national science and technology policy, and education. From 1977 to 1983 he served as Staff Officer, Commission on Engineering and Technical Systems, National Research Council. Before that he was a freelance writer. He holds a B.A. degree (1971) from St. John's College, Annapolis, Maryland.