APPENDIX D
Committee and Staff Biographies

COMMITTEE MEMBERS

Gene H.Porter is an independent consultant in matters relating to national security planning and weapon systems development. His current clients include the Center for Naval Analyses (CNA), for which he works on matters relating to Navy acquisition programs, and the Institute for Defense Analyses, for which he works on matters relating to the Quadrennial Defense Review. His expertise is in undersea systems R&D, operations and system analysis, and acquisition management. Prior to his retirement in 1999, Mr. Porter served as a senior fellow at CNA, where he provided analysis for the Interagency Task Force on the Roles and Missions of the U.S. Coast Guard in support of both national defense goals and the more traditional humanitarian, maritime law enforcement, and regulatory missions. During his tenure at CNA, Mr. Porter also served as an advisor to the Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Research, Development, and Acquisition on matters aimed at reducing the total ownership costs of naval systems through improved management processes and better cost visibility. Prior to joining CNA, he served as director of acquisition policy and program integration for the Office of the Undersecretary of Defense for Acquisition, where he directed long-range planning, programming, and budgeting matters on new military warfare systems. His earlier career included various staff and line management positions at Sanders Corporation (a Lockheed Martin Company) in the development and manufacture of military and commercial electronic systems, to include mine and undersea warfare systems. Mr. Porter is an honors graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy. He served 5 years in nuclear submarines and then was selected for assignment to the Office of the Secretary of Defense. Mr. Porter has served on numerous



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Naval Mine Warfare: Operational and Technical Challenges for Naval Forces APPENDIX D Committee and Staff Biographies COMMITTEE MEMBERS Gene H.Porter is an independent consultant in matters relating to national security planning and weapon systems development. His current clients include the Center for Naval Analyses (CNA), for which he works on matters relating to Navy acquisition programs, and the Institute for Defense Analyses, for which he works on matters relating to the Quadrennial Defense Review. His expertise is in undersea systems R&D, operations and system analysis, and acquisition management. Prior to his retirement in 1999, Mr. Porter served as a senior fellow at CNA, where he provided analysis for the Interagency Task Force on the Roles and Missions of the U.S. Coast Guard in support of both national defense goals and the more traditional humanitarian, maritime law enforcement, and regulatory missions. During his tenure at CNA, Mr. Porter also served as an advisor to the Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Research, Development, and Acquisition on matters aimed at reducing the total ownership costs of naval systems through improved management processes and better cost visibility. Prior to joining CNA, he served as director of acquisition policy and program integration for the Office of the Undersecretary of Defense for Acquisition, where he directed long-range planning, programming, and budgeting matters on new military warfare systems. His earlier career included various staff and line management positions at Sanders Corporation (a Lockheed Martin Company) in the development and manufacture of military and commercial electronic systems, to include mine and undersea warfare systems. Mr. Porter is an honors graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy. He served 5 years in nuclear submarines and then was selected for assignment to the Office of the Secretary of Defense. Mr. Porter has served on numerous

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Naval Mine Warfare: Operational and Technical Challenges for Naval Forces scientific and advisory groups, including service as the deputy executive director of the congressionally chartered Commission on the Roles and Missions of the Armed Forces. Seymour J.Deitchman is an independent consultant in matters relating to national security, R&D management, and systems evaluation. A mechanical and aeronautical engineer by training and earlier experience, Mr. Deitchman served as vice president for programs at the Institute for Defense Analyses. Mr. Deitchman once served as special assistant in the Office of the Secretary of Defense, where he established and oversaw the DOD program of R&D in support of U.S. military operations in Southeast Asia. He also served as director of overseas defense research at the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA), where he was responsible for planning and executing ARPA’s specific R&D program on counterinsurgency and related technical matters in the same area. He has been a member of numerous government and scientific advisory groups, an occasional lecturer at the National War College and Industrial College of the Armed Forces, and a U.S. delegate to the NATO Defense Research Group. Mr. Deitchman was recently honored by the Military Operations Research Society as its 2000 Wanner Award recipient. Mr. Deitchman is currently a member of the NSB. Albert J.Baciocco, Jr., retired from the U.S. Navy as a Vice Admiral in 1987 after 34 years of distinguished service, principally within the nuclear submarine force and directing the Navy Department research and technology development enterprise. He graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1953 with a B.S. degree in engineering. Upon retirement from the Navy, Admiral Baciocco formed the Baciocco Group, Inc., a technical and management consulting practice providing services to industry primarily in the areas of strategic planning, technology investment and application, and business planning and development. Admiral Baciocco is a director of American Superconductor Corporation and is associated with several new technology business enterprises. In addition, he serves on several boards and committees of government, industry, and academe, among them the board of trustees for the South Carolina Research Authority and on the board of directors for the University of South Carolina Research Institute and the Foundation for Research Development at the Medical University of South Carolina. In addition, he serves as chair of the Southeastern Universities Research Association’s Maritime Technical Advisory Committee to the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Laboratory in Newport News, Virginia. Admiral Baciocco is the recipient of Florida Atlantic University’s Honorary Doctorate in Ocean Engineering. Admiral Baciocco is currently a member of the NSB. Arthur B.Baggeroer is the Ford Professor of Engineering for Ocean Science in the Departments of Ocean and Electrical Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). A member of the NAE, Dr. Baggeroer’s research

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Naval Mine Warfare: Operational and Technical Challenges for Naval Forces interests primarily relate to advanced signal processing methods applied to sonar, ocean acoustics, and geophysics. During his career at MIT, Dr. Baggeroer served as director of the MIT-Woods Hole Joint Program in Oceanography and Oceanographic Engineering. During sabbatical leaves, he served as a consultant to the Chief of Naval Research at the SACLANT Center in La Spezia, Italy, and as a Green Scholar at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. Dr. Baggeroer has served on numerous scientific and technical advisory groups and is currently a member of the NRC’s Ocean Studies Board and Naval Studies Board. He is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers and of the Acoustical Society of America. Ruzena K.Bajcsy is assistant director for the Computer and Information Science and Engineering Directorate at the National Science Foundation (NSF). A member of the NAE and IOM, Dr. Bajcsy obtained a Ph.D. from Slovak Technical University and a second Ph.D. from Stanford University. Prior to coming to NSF, she served as the chair for the Computer and Information Science Department at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Bajcsy’s research interests include machine perception, computer vision, characterizing and solving problems involving segmentation, and three-dimensional vision and other sensory modalities that function together with vision. She has served on numerous scientific and technical advisory groups, including the NRC’s Army Technical Assessment Board. She is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers and a founding fellow of the American Association of Artificial Intelligence. Ronald L.Beckwith retired as a Major General from the U.S. Marine Corps in 1991 after 34 years of service. General Beckwith’s military career includes senior leadership responsibilities in expeditionary warfare, including Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Expeditionary Force Programs. Upon his retirement in 1991, General Beckwith formed LeeCor, Inc., a professional management services company serving both industry and government. A naval aviator by training, General Beckwith is interested in shallow water mine countermeasures; C4ISR; sea-lift expeditionary force fire support; training, modeling and simulation; R&D in synchronization with current defense planning; and, more recently, the development of knowledge management software used in information system applications. John R.Benedict, Jr., is a member of the principal professional staff for the Joint Warfare Analysis Department at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. Mr. Benedict has an extensive background in naval operations analysis, primarily in the area of undersea warfare, with special emphasis on antisubmarine warfare and mine countermeasure systems. He has served as a study leader and principal investigator on a variety of tasks involving examination of performance trade-offs among platforms, sensors, and weapons. Recent

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Naval Mine Warfare: Operational and Technical Challenges for Naval Forces efforts have included an examination of the long-term mine reconnaissance system, the organic airborne and surface influence sweep system, the airborne mine neutralization system, and the rapid airborne mine clearance system. D.Richard Blidberg is the Director of the Autonomous Undersea Systems Institute (formerly the Marine Systems Engineering Laboratory (MSEL)). Mr. Blidberg has been involved in the development of autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) systems for more than 20 years. Prior to co-founding the MSEL, Mr. Blidberg managed the seabed survey operations at Ocean Research Equipment, Inc.; served with the U.S. Coast Guard; and worked at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute. His present interests are focused on the development of technologies related to autonomous submersible vehicles and include the investigation of architectures for intelligent guidance and control of multiple autonomous vehicles. He has over 60 publications related to AUV technology and served on numerous scientific and technical advisory groups. He is currently the associate editor of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers’ Journal of Ocean Engineering. L.Eric Cross is Evan Pugh Professor Emeritus of Electrical Engineering, a former director of the Materials Research Laboratory at Pennsylvania State University, and a member of the NAE. His research interests include ferroelectrics; ferroelastic and secondary ferroic phenomena; phase transitions; phenomenology of proper and improper ferroelectric, dielectric, piezoelectric, and pyroelectric crystals; ceramics and composites; electrostriction; measurement of electrostrictive strain; and processing and fabrication of multilayer ceramic structures for dielectric and piezoelectric applications. Dr. Cross has served on numerous scientific and technical advisory groups. He is a fellow of the American Ceramics Society, the American Institute of Physics, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, and the American Optical Society. Jose B.Cruz, Jr., is the Howard D.Winbigler Chair in Engineering and a professor of Electrical Engineering at Ohio State University (OSU). A member of the NAE, Dr. Cruz previously served as dean of the College of Engineering. His research interests include multiagent control of complex systems, leader-follower strategies in dynamic games, multiagent command and control in intelligent hostile environments, and application of multiagent incentive strategies in energy systems. Prior to joining OSU, he served as chair of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at the University of California, Irvine. Dr. Cruz has held a number of teaching positions throughout his professional career, including positions at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the University of Illinois. Dr. Cruz is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

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Naval Mine Warfare: Operational and Technical Challenges for Naval Forces Sabrina R.Edlow is the research team leader for the Mine Warfare Systems Team at the Center for Naval Analyses. Ms. Edlow recently led the Mine Countermeasures Force-21 study, which quantitatively balances the Navy’s programming plans and strategies for evolving organic mine countermeasures systems against future warfighting requirements and capabilities. She also recently assessed war plans and executed operations for Desert Thunder and Desert Fox. Her research interests encompass a wide range of areas, including naval force structure planning, mine warfare, overhead systems, and underwater acoustic systems. A nuclear engineer by training, Ms. Edlow began her career as a design engineer at Duke Power Company, where she coordinated the nuclear fuel supply for seven nuclear reactors. Robert A.Frosch is an associate and a senior research fellow in the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs of the John F.Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. He is a member of the NAE, and his interests include theoretical physics, acoustical oceanography, seismology, marine physics, R&D management, industrial research, and ecology. Dr. Frosch has served in a number of key senior leadership positions in both industry and government, among them director of Hudson Laboratories, deputy director of the Advanced Research Projects Agency, Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Research and Development, assistant executive director of the United Nations’ Environment Programme, administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and vice president of research at General Motors. Dr. Frosch served on the Fusion Science Assessment Committee, is currently serving on the NRC Committee on Grand Challenges in the Environmental Sciences, and is vice chair of the NRC’s Report Review Committee. Lee M.Hunt, an independent consultant, is the former director of the NRC’s Naval Studies Board. Mr. Hunt’s long-time experience with sea and land mine warfare, as well as explosive ordnance disposal, covers sea and land mine countermeasures in World War II, explosive ordnance disposal in the Korean conflict, and some 70 technical reports on land and sea mines and countermeasures during his 35 years with the NRC. In addition, since 1964 he has been a proponent of measures to reduce the global accumulation of unexploded ordnance. Since his retirement in 1995 he has authored several papers on the above subjects and has participated in several mine warfare studies, and he continues to be heavily involved in all of the above areas as vice president for academic affairs with the Mine Warfare Association. Mr. Hunt served on the NRC Committee on Alternative Technologies to Replace Antipersonnel Landmines. William J.Hurley has been on the research staff at the Institute for Defense Analyses (IDA) since 1985 and is currently a member of IDA’s Joint Advanced Warfighting Program, which helps DOD to develop new joint warfighting con-

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Naval Mine Warfare: Operational and Technical Challenges for Naval Forces cepts and capabilities, design experiments to explore those concepts, and facilitate their effective implementation. From 1975 to 1985 Dr. Hurley was with the Center for Naval Analyses. His research has addressed a range of defense issues, with special emphasis on joint forces, naval forces, and undersea warfare. He has directed or co-authored more than 30 studies sponsored principally by the Office of the Secretary of Defense and the Navy. In addition, from 1991 to 1998 Dr. Hurley was the associate program director and then program director of the Defense Science Study Group, a DARPA-sponsored program of education and study that introduces outstanding young professors of science and engineering to military systems and organizations and current issues of national security. In 1993 Dr. Hurley received the Andrew J.Goodpaster Award for Excellence in Research from IDA. Dr. Hurley received a B.S. in physics from Boston College (1965) and a Ph.D. in physics from the University of Rochester (1971), and he held research positions at Syracuse University (1970–1972) and at the University of Texas (1972–1975). Harry W.Jenkins, MajGen, U.S. Marine Corps (retired), is the director of business development and a congressional liaison at ITT Industries-Defense, where he is responsible for activities in support of tactical communications systems and airborne electronic warfare between the Navy, Marine Corps, National Guard, and appropriate committees in Congress. General Jenkins’ operational background is in expeditionary warfare and the use of C4I systems. During Desert Storm, General Jenkins served as the Commanding General of the Fourth Marine Expeditionary Brigade, directing operational planning, training and employment of the ground units, aviation assets, and command and control systems in the 17,000 man amphibious force. In his last position before retirement from the U.S. Marine Corps, General Jenkins, as the director of expeditionary warfare for the Chief of Naval Operations, initiated a detailed program for C4I systems improvements for large-deck amphibious ships and reorganized the Navy’s unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) efforts for operations from aircraft carriers and amphibious ships. He is a member of numerous professional societies, including the Navy League and the Aerospace Industries Association. Irwin Mendelson is a retired president for the Engineering Division at Pratt and Whitney, where he oversaw a total staff of 8,000 and an annual budget of $900 million and was responsible for the design, development, and installation of aircraft engine systems. A mechanical engineer by training, he specialized primarily in commercial and military aircraft engine design. During his career, Mr. Mendelson was directly responsible for the design and development of turbofan engines, jet engine fuel controls, pyrophoric ignition systems, and thrust vector controls for rockets.

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Naval Mine Warfare: Operational and Technical Challenges for Naval Forces John D.Pearson retired from the U.S. Navy as a Rear Admiral in 1996 after 35 years of service, principally within the surface warfare force. Admiral Pearson’s last position was as commander of the Mine Warfare Command, where he was responsible for the readiness of U.S. Navy mine warfare forces in conducting offensive and defensive mine warfare operations throughout the world. Today Admiral Pearson serves as the chair of mine warfare at the Naval Postgraduate School. He has served on numerous scientific and technical advisory groups and is currently president of the Mine Warfare Association. Ronald L.Woodfin recently retired as a staff member of the Sandia National Laboratories, where his research interests included mine countermeasures and demining, as well as the development of rigid polyurethane foam to form roadways over the barriers and/or minefields encountered in the beach and surf zone regions during an amphibious assault. Previously, he worked at the Naval Weapons Center, Naval Undersea Center, and Boeing Commercial Airplane Division. Dr. Woodfin has been an invited participant at several international demining conferences and was a member of an advisory task force on humanitarian demining for the General Board of Global Ministries of the United Methodist Church. He is on the faculty of Wayland Baptist University, Albuquerque, New Mexico, campus. Markus Zahn is a professor of electrical engineering in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He also directs the EECS VI-A Internship program, a cooperative work study program with industry and government. Dr. Zahn’s research interests include electro-optical field and charge mapping measurements; high-voltage charge transport and breakdown phenomena in dielectrics; flow electrification phenomena; and capacitive and inductive sensors for measuring dielectric, conduction, and magnetic properties of materials. He is the author of numerous publications on electromagnetic field theory. Dr. Zahn is a fellow of Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. Edward Zdankiewicz, an independent consultant, retired as engineering department manager of Northrop Grumman Oceanic Systems in 1998, where his responsibilities included departmental management of all R&D, as well as production efforts related to acoustic and mechanical undersea systems. Prior to joining Northrop, Mr. Zdankiewicz served as Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Mine and Undersea Warfare from 1993 to 1997, providing technical guidance to the Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Research, Development, and Acquisition on antisubmarine warfare and mine warfare issues. Mr. Zdankiewicz began his professional career as a design engineer at the Naval Ordnance Laboratory, progressing to key management responsibilities in the development of submarine

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Naval Mine Warfare: Operational and Technical Challenges for Naval Forces launched torpedoes and mines. He has served in a number of scientific and technical capacities, including as an undersea warfare specialist in the Office of the Secretary of Defense and as a military legislative assistant to Senator John Glenn. STAFF Charles F.Draper is a senior program officer at the National Research Council’s (NRC) Naval Studies Board. Prior to joining the NRC in 1997, Dr. Draper was the lead mechanical engineer at S.T. Research Corporation, where he provided technical and program management support for satellite earth station and small satellite design. He received his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from Vanderbilt University in 1995; his doctoral research was conducted at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), where he used an atomic force microscope to measure the nano-mechanical properties of thin film materials. In parallel with his graduate student duties, Dr. Draper was a mechanical engineer with Geo-Centers, Incorporated, working onsite at NRL on the development of an underwater x-ray back-scattering tomography system used for the nondestructive evaluation of U.S. Navy sonar domes on surface ships. Ronald D.Taylor has been the director of the Naval Studies Board of the National Research Council since 1995. He joined the National Research Council in 1990 as a program officer with the Board on Physics and Astronomy and in 1994 became associate director of the Naval Studies Board. During his tenure at the National Research Council Dr. Taylor has overseen the initiation and production of more than 40 studies focused on the application of science and technology to problems of national interest. Many of these studies address national security and national defense issues. From 1984 to 1990 Dr. Taylor was a research staff scientist with Berkeley Research Associates, working onsite at the Naval Research Laboratory on projects related to the development and application of charged particle beams. Prior to 1984 Dr. Taylor held both teaching and research positions in several academic institutions, including assistant professor of physics at Villanova University, research associate in chemistry at the University of Toronto, and instructor of physics at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. Dr. Taylor holds a Ph.D. and an M.S. in physics from the College of William and Mary and a B.A. in physics from Johns Hopkins University. In addition to science policy, Dr. Taylor’s scientific and technical expertise is in the areas of atomic and molecular collision theory, chemical dynamics, and atomic processes in plasmas. He has authored or co-authored nearly 30 professional scientific papers or technical reports and given more than two dozen contributed or invited papers at scientific meetings.