Appendix E Air Force Evolutionary Concepts and Associated Information Systems Technologies

The evolutionary concepts of the Air Force are being driven by the demand for information. Indeed, information is becoming the “force multiplier” for the Air Force of the future. The increased emphasis on information and associated evolutionary trends can be found in many current and recent Air Force warfighting concepts; the time-critical targets (TCTs) problem; and modeling, simulation, and collaboration (MS&C). These warfighting concepts include:

  1. dynamic aerospace command

  2. joint battlespace infosphere

  3. information operations

  4. integrated aerospace operations

  5. expeditionary aerospace force

  6. effects-based operations

Very brief descriptions of these concepts, the TCT problem, MS&C, and their associated information systems technology drivers follow (DSTAG, 2000):

  1. Dynamic aerospace command (distributed, configurable centers to support variable missions with joint, combined, and coalition forces)

    • capability to build and maintain dynamic air execution order

    • distributed, configurable centers, adaptable to mission, resources, guidance, and command style

    • minimal forward-deployed footprint

    • high-bandwidth, secure communications among units

  1. Joint battlespace infosphere (integrated, current, consistent, globally accessible information)

    • core services of publish, subscribe, query, and control

    • development of information-centric client applications

    • exploitation of relevant commercial technologies

  1. Information operations (comprehensive capability that incorporates both offensive and defensive information warfare)

    • integration of defensive and offensive information warfare

    • computer and network attack protection, detection, and response

    • secure, survivable networks for sensitive and classified traffic for joint/coalition operations

    • information assurance for embedded systems

  1. Integrated aerospace operations (integrated planning and execution of air and space operations)

    • integration of C2 information systems that are fundamental enablers of an integrated aerospace force

    • control and integration of unmanned aerial vehicles and of uninhabited combat air vehicle, air, and space systems

    • aerospace experimentation

    • aerospace systems interoperability

    • global information services with assured availability and quality



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Review of the U.S. Department of Defence Air, Space, and Supporting Information Systems Science and Technology Program Appendix E Air Force Evolutionary Concepts and Associated Information Systems Technologies The evolutionary concepts of the Air Force are being driven by the demand for information. Indeed, information is becoming the “force multiplier” for the Air Force of the future. The increased emphasis on information and associated evolutionary trends can be found in many current and recent Air Force warfighting concepts; the time-critical targets (TCTs) problem; and modeling, simulation, and collaboration (MS&C). These warfighting concepts include: dynamic aerospace command joint battlespace infosphere information operations integrated aerospace operations expeditionary aerospace force effects-based operations Very brief descriptions of these concepts, the TCT problem, MS&C, and their associated information systems technology drivers follow (DSTAG, 2000): Dynamic aerospace command (distributed, configurable centers to support variable missions with joint, combined, and coalition forces) capability to build and maintain dynamic air execution order distributed, configurable centers, adaptable to mission, resources, guidance, and command style minimal forward-deployed footprint high-bandwidth, secure communications among units Joint battlespace infosphere (integrated, current, consistent, globally accessible information) core services of publish, subscribe, query, and control development of information-centric client applications exploitation of relevant commercial technologies Information operations (comprehensive capability that incorporates both offensive and defensive information warfare) integration of defensive and offensive information warfare computer and network attack protection, detection, and response secure, survivable networks for sensitive and classified traffic for joint/coalition operations information assurance for embedded systems Integrated aerospace operations (integrated planning and execution of air and space operations) integration of C2 information systems that are fundamental enablers of an integrated aerospace force control and integration of unmanned aerial vehicles and of uninhabited combat air vehicle, air, and space systems aerospace experimentation aerospace systems interoperability global information services with assured availability and quality

OCR for page 63
Review of the U.S. Department of Defence Air, Space, and Supporting Information Systems Science and Technology Program Expeditionary aerospace force (rapid deployment of forces, small deployed footprint, connectivity to other deployed and in-garrison forces) “reach-around” to distributed centers coalition interoperability information management, access, and distribution in-transit visibility affordable integration of military and commercial satellite communications (SATCOM) antijam and differential Global Positioning System improved chemical and biological detection Effects-based operations (the right effect, on the right target, at the right time) right information+right force+right timing=right effect determining what effects best achieve commander in chief’s goals linking and integrating effects into theater-wide scheme of execution directing execution through dynamic, real-time C2 creating effects concurrently at all levels of war and throughout the entire battlefield Time-critical targets (dynamic battle control and dynamic targeting) seamless near-real-time operations between sensors, decision makers, shooters, and weapons exploitation of moving-target indicator data to find, fix, track, and engage mobile targets in “hide” mode and in motion “no move” zones versus “no fly” zones information architectures for real-time information into and out of the cockpit robust terminal guidance Modeling, simulation, and collaboration (“train like we fight,” realistic mission rehearsal, and simulation-based acquisition) distributed, interactive, C2 simulations and visualizations to enable expeditionary forces to plan and rehearse missions; making the synthetic battlespace part of the operational battlespace courses of action assessment; real-time simulation generation for decision making collaborative enterprises, not only for battlespace support, but also for training, analysis, and acquisition The above concepts and their drivers indicate the strong dependency of future Air Force capabilities on information systems, and support the need for a rigorous information systems technology science and technology investment strategy. REFERENCE DSTAG (Defense Science and Technology Advisory Group). 2000. U.S. Air Force Vision, Information Systems Technology (IST) Technology Area Review and Assessment (TARA). Defense Science and Technology Advisory Group, Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Science and Technology (DUSD (S&T)), Air Force Research Laboratory, Rome, New York, March 13–17, 2000.