Appendix A Biographies of Committee Members

David Patterson, Chair, is the E.H. and M.E.Pardee Chair of Computer Science at the University of California at Berkeley. He has taught computer architecture since joining the faculty in 1977 and has been chair of the Computer Science Division of the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department at Berkeley. He is well known for leading the design and implementation of RISC I, the first VLSI Reduced Instruction Set Computer, which became the foundation for the architecture currently used by Fujitsu, Sun Microsystems, and Xerox. He was also a leader of the Redundant Arrays of Inexpensive Disks (RAID) project, which led to high-performance storage systems from many companies, and the Network of Workstation (NOW) project, which led to cluster technology used by Internet companies such as Inktomi. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM). He served as chair of the Computing Research Association (CRA). His current research interests are in building novel microprocessors using Intelligent DRAM (IRAM) for use in portable multimedia devices and in creating Intelligent Storage (ISTORE) to provide available, maintainable, and evolvable servers for Internet services. He has consulted for many companies, including Digital, Hewlett-Packard, Intel, and Sun Microsystems, and he is the co-author of five books. Dr. Patterson served on the CSTB committees that produced Computing the Future and Making IT Better.

David D.Clark graduated from Swarthmore College in 1966 and received his Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1973. He has worked since then at the MIT Laboratory for Computer Science, where he is currently a senior research scientist in charge of the Advanced Network Architecture group. Dr. Clark’s research interests include networks, network protocols, operating systems, distributed systems, and computer and communications security. After receiving his Ph.D., he worked on the early stages of the ARPANET and on the development of token ring local area network technology. Since the mid-1970s, Dr. Clark has been involved in the development of the Internet. From 1981 to 1989, he acted as chief protocol architect for this development and chaired the Internet Activities Board. His current research area is protocols and architectures for very large and very high speed networks. Specific activities include extensions to the Internet to support real-time traffic, explicit allocation of service, pricing, and new network technologies. In the security area, Dr. Clark participated in the early development of the multilevel secure Multics operating system. He developed an information security model that stresses integrity of data rather than disclosure control. Dr. Clark is a fellow of the ACM and the IEEE and a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He received the ACM SIGCOMM award, the IEEE award in international communications, and the IEEE Hamming Award for his work on the Internet. He is a consultant to a number of companies and serves on a number of technical advisory boards. Dr. Clark is currently the chair of the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board. He chaired the committee that produced the CSTB report Computers at Risk: Safe Computing in the Information Age. He also served on the committees that produced the CSTB reports Toward a National Research Network, Realizing the Information Future: The Internet and Beyond, and The Unpredictable Certainty: Information Infrastructure Through 2000.

Anna Karlin is a professor in the Computer Science and Engineering Department at the University of Washington. After receiving her Ph.D. in computer science at Stanford University



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Looking Over the Fence at Networks: A Neighbor’s View of Networking Research Appendix A Biographies of Committee Members David Patterson, Chair, is the E.H. and M.E.Pardee Chair of Computer Science at the University of California at Berkeley. He has taught computer architecture since joining the faculty in 1977 and has been chair of the Computer Science Division of the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department at Berkeley. He is well known for leading the design and implementation of RISC I, the first VLSI Reduced Instruction Set Computer, which became the foundation for the architecture currently used by Fujitsu, Sun Microsystems, and Xerox. He was also a leader of the Redundant Arrays of Inexpensive Disks (RAID) project, which led to high-performance storage systems from many companies, and the Network of Workstation (NOW) project, which led to cluster technology used by Internet companies such as Inktomi. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM). He served as chair of the Computing Research Association (CRA). His current research interests are in building novel microprocessors using Intelligent DRAM (IRAM) for use in portable multimedia devices and in creating Intelligent Storage (ISTORE) to provide available, maintainable, and evolvable servers for Internet services. He has consulted for many companies, including Digital, Hewlett-Packard, Intel, and Sun Microsystems, and he is the co-author of five books. Dr. Patterson served on the CSTB committees that produced Computing the Future and Making IT Better. David D.Clark graduated from Swarthmore College in 1966 and received his Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1973. He has worked since then at the MIT Laboratory for Computer Science, where he is currently a senior research scientist in charge of the Advanced Network Architecture group. Dr. Clark’s research interests include networks, network protocols, operating systems, distributed systems, and computer and communications security. After receiving his Ph.D., he worked on the early stages of the ARPANET and on the development of token ring local area network technology. Since the mid-1970s, Dr. Clark has been involved in the development of the Internet. From 1981 to 1989, he acted as chief protocol architect for this development and chaired the Internet Activities Board. His current research area is protocols and architectures for very large and very high speed networks. Specific activities include extensions to the Internet to support real-time traffic, explicit allocation of service, pricing, and new network technologies. In the security area, Dr. Clark participated in the early development of the multilevel secure Multics operating system. He developed an information security model that stresses integrity of data rather than disclosure control. Dr. Clark is a fellow of the ACM and the IEEE and a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He received the ACM SIGCOMM award, the IEEE award in international communications, and the IEEE Hamming Award for his work on the Internet. He is a consultant to a number of companies and serves on a number of technical advisory boards. Dr. Clark is currently the chair of the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board. He chaired the committee that produced the CSTB report Computers at Risk: Safe Computing in the Information Age. He also served on the committees that produced the CSTB reports Toward a National Research Network, Realizing the Information Future: The Internet and Beyond, and The Unpredictable Certainty: Information Infrastructure Through 2000. Anna Karlin is a professor in the Computer Science and Engineering Department at the University of Washington. After receiving her Ph.D. in computer science at Stanford University

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Looking Over the Fence at Networks: A Neighbor’s View of Networking Research in 1987, she did postdoctoral work at Princeton University. She then joined Digital Equipment Corporation’s Systems Research Center in 1988 as a research scientist and worked there until she came to the University of Washington in 1994. Her research interests include competitive analysis of online algorithms, design and analysis of probabilistic algorithms, and the design and analysis of algorithms for problems in operating systems, architecture, and distributed systems. She is currently a member of the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board. Jim Kurose received a B.A. degree in physics from Wesleyan University in 1978 and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in computer science from Columbia University in 1980 and 1984, respectively. He is currently professor and chair of the Department of Computer Science at the University of Massachusetts, where he is also codirector of the Networking Research Laboratory and the Multimedia Systems Laboratory. Professor Kurose was a visiting scientist at IBM Research during the 1990–1991 academic year and at INRIA and EURECOM, both in Sophia Antipolis, France, during the 1997–1998 academic year. His research interests include real-time and multimedia communication, network and operating system support for servers, and modeling and performance evaluation. Dr. Kurose is the past editor in chief of the IEEE Transactions on Communications and of the IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking. He has been active in the program committees for IEEE Infocom, ACM SIGCOMM, and ACM SIGMETRICS conferences for a number of years. He is the six-time recipient of the Outstanding Teacher Award from the National Technological University (NTU), the recipient of the Outstanding Teacher Award from the College of Natural Science and Mathematics at the University of Massachusetts, and the recipient of the 1996 Outstanding Teaching Award of the Northeast Association of Graduate Schools. He has been the recipient of a General Electric fellowship, an IBM faculty development award, and a Lilly teaching fellowship. He is a fellow of the IEEE and a member of ACM, Phi Beta Kappa, Eta Kappa Nu, and Sigma Xi. With Keith Ross, he is the coauthor of the textbook Computer Networking, a Top Down Approach Featuring the Internet, published by Addison-Wesley Longman in 2000. Edward D.Lazowska is professor and chair of the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Washington. Lazowska received his B.A. from Brown University in 1972 and his Ph.D. from the University of Toronto in 1977. He has been at the University of Washington since that time. His research concerns the design and analysis of distributed and parallel computer systems. Dr. Lazowska is a member of the NSF Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering Advisory Committee, chair of the Computing Research Association, a member of DARPA ISAT, and a member of the Technical Advisory Board for Microsoft Research. Dr. Lazowska is currently a member of the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board. He served on the CSTB committee that produced the report Evolving the High Performance Computing and Communications Initiative to Support the Nation’s Information Infrastructure. He is a fellow of the ACM and of the IEEE. David Liddle is a general partner in the firm U.S. Venture Partners (USVP). It is a leading Silicon Valley venture capital firm that specializes in building companies from an early stage in digital communications/networking, e-commerce, semiconductors, technical software, and e-health. He retired in December 1999 after 8 years as CEO of Interval Research Corporation. During and after his education (B.S., E.E., University of Michigan; Ph.D., computer science, University of Toledo, Ohio), Dr. Liddle spent his professional career developing technologies for interaction and communication between people and computers, in activities spanning research, development, management, and entrepreneurship. First, he spent 10 years at the Xerox Palo Alto Research Center and the Xerox Information Products Group where he was responsible for the first commercial implementation of the Graphical User Interface and local area networking. He then founded Metaphor Computer Systems, whose technology was adopted by IBM and which was ultimately acquired by IBM in 1991. In 1992, Dr. Liddle cofounded Interval Research with

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Looking Over the Fence at Networks: A Neighbor’s View of Networking Research Paul Allen. Since 1996, the company formed six new companies and several joint ventures based on the research conducted at Interval. Dr. Liddle is a consulting professor of computer science at Stanford University. He has served as a director at Sybase, Broderbund Software, Metricom, Starwave, and Ticketmaster. He was honored as a distinguished alumnus from the University of Michigan and is a member of the national advisory committee at the College of Engineering of that university. He is also a member of the advisory committee of the school of Engineering at Stanford University. He has been elected a Senior Fellow of the Royal College of Art for his contributions to human-computer interaction. Dr. Liddle currently serves on the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board. Derek McAuley is director of Marconi Labs, Cambridge, England. He obtained his B.A. in mathematics from the University of Cambridge in 1982 and his Ph.D. addressing issues in interconnecting heterogeneous ATM networks in 1989. After 5 years at the University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory as a lecturer, he moved in 1995 to the University of Glasgow as chair of the Department of Computing Science. He returned to Cambridge in July 1997 to help found the Microsoft Research facility in Cambridge, a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. In January 2001 he was presented with a second once-in-a-lifetime opportunity as founder of Marconi Labs. His research interests include networking, distributed systems, and operating systems. Vern Paxson is a senior scientist with the AT&T Center for Internet Research at the International Computer Science Institute in Berkeley and a staff scientist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. His research focuses on Internet measurement and network intrusion detection. He serves on the editorial board of IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking and has been active in the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF), chairing working groups on performance metrics, TCP implementation, and end-point congestion management, as well as serving on the Internet Engineering Steering Group (IESG) as an area director for transport. He has participated in numerous program committees, including SIGCOMM, USENIX, USENIX Security, and RAID; co-chairs the 2002 SIGCOMM networking conference; and is a member of the steering committee for the SIGCOMM Internet Measurement Workshop, 2001. He received his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of California, Berkeley. Stefan Savage is an assistant professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at the University of California, San Diego. Prior to joining the faculty at UCSD in 2001, his doctoral work was at the University of Washington. Dr. Savage’s current research interests focus on wide-area networking, reliability, and security. Previously he has worked broadly in the field of experimental computer systems, including research on real-time scheduling, operating system construction, disk array design, concurrency control, and performance analysis. Ellen W.Zegura received the B.S. degrees in computer science and electrical engineering (1987), the M.S. degree in computer science (1990), and the D.Sc. degree in computer science (1993), all from Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri. She has been on the faculty at the College of Computing, Georgia Institute of Technology, since 1993. She is currently an associate professor and assistant dean of facilities planning. Her research interests include active networking, server selection, anycast and multicast routing, and modeling large-scale internetworks. Her work in topology modeling is widely recognized as providing the best current models to use in simulation-based studies of Internet problems. A software package implementing these models is in frequent use by other research groups and has been incorporated into one of the leading public domain software tools for Internet simulations. Her work in active (or programmable) networking is among the earliest in this relatively new field. Her focus on applications of active networking—and rigorous comparison of active solutions to traditional solutions—distinguishes her work from that of the many other groups who have focused on enabling technologies. Dr. Zegura is currently leading a DARPA working group on composable

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Looking Over the Fence at Networks: A Neighbor’s View of Networking Research services and applications and editing a document intended to serve as a foundation for research and development efforts in the DARPA community. Her work in the server selection area focuses on techniques for the effective use of replicas of servers distributed over the wide area. She has developed an architecture to support server selection on a wide range of performance and policy criteria, thus supporting diversity in the service or in client preferences. She has also explored the implications of server selection in the presence of emerging technologies, including multicast-capable servers and QoS-capable networks. Dr. Zegura has served on a variety of NSF award selection panels and numerous conference program committees, as well as three conference executive committees (as Publicity Chair for ICNP’97 Student Travel Grant, Chair for Sigcomm’97, and Tutorials Chair for Sigcomm’99). She was co-chair of the 2nd Workshop on Internet Server Performance, held in conjunction with ACM Sigmetrics. She also served on the selection committee for the CRA Distributed Mentor program. Dr. Zegura’s work has been funded by DARPA, the NSF, the CRA, and NASA. She has also received industrial grants from Hitachi Telecom, USA, and internal university grants from the Packaging Research Center and the Broadband Telecommunications Center.