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Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

PHILIP R. CLARK (NAE) (Chair) is a 45-year veteran in the field of naval reactors and commercial nuclear power. From 1950 to his retirement in December 1995, he was with GPU Nuclear Corporation of which he was President and CEO from 1983-95. There he was responsible for cleanup of the damaged TMI-2 plant, restarting TMI-1, operating Oyster Creek, and decommissioning Saxton. As a manager he has been responsible for research, development, design, construction, operation, maintenance, training, quality assurance, budget, and decommissioning cleanup. Mr. Clark is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a fellow of the American Nuclear Society. During his government service, he was associate director of reactors in the Naval Reactor Division of the U.S. Department of Energy and chief of the Reactor Engineering Division, Nuclear Power Directorate, Naval Sea Systems Command. While in these positions he directed a major element of the U.S. Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program and received the Navy Distinguished Civilian Service Award and the U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration Special Achievement Award. Mr. Clark earned a B.S. degree in civil engineering in 1951 from Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn, where he has also done graduate study. Mr. Clark has served on several NRC committees, including the Committee on Improving Project Management, the Committee on Decontamination and Decommissioning of Uranium Enrichment Facilities, and the NAE Membership Task Group.

ANTHONY CAMPILLO is the head of the Optical Physics Branch at the Naval Research Laboratory, where he directs research in the areas of laser development, optical diagnostic and sensor development, photonics, and nanotechnology. He is an active researcher who currently publishes in the areas of laser chemical analysis, photonic bandgap structures, and microcavity effects. He has also done research in laser



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Page 97 B Biographical Sketches of Committee Members PHILIP R. CLARK (NAE) (Chair) is a 45-year veteran in the field of naval reactors and commercial nuclear power. From 1950 to his retirement in December 1995, he was with GPU Nuclear Corporation of which he was President and CEO from 1983-95. There he was responsible for cleanup of the damaged TMI-2 plant, restarting TMI-1, operating Oyster Creek, and decommissioning Saxton. As a manager he has been responsible for research, development, design, construction, operation, maintenance, training, quality assurance, budget, and decommissioning cleanup. Mr. Clark is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a fellow of the American Nuclear Society. During his government service, he was associate director of reactors in the Naval Reactor Division of the U.S. Department of Energy and chief of the Reactor Engineering Division, Nuclear Power Directorate, Naval Sea Systems Command. While in these positions he directed a major element of the U.S. Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program and received the Navy Distinguished Civilian Service Award and the U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration Special Achievement Award. Mr. Clark earned a B.S. degree in civil engineering in 1951 from Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn, where he has also done graduate study. Mr. Clark has served on several NRC committees, including the Committee on Improving Project Management, the Committee on Decontamination and Decommissioning of Uranium Enrichment Facilities, and the NAE Membership Task Group. ANTHONY CAMPILLO is the head of the Optical Physics Branch at the Naval Research Laboratory, where he directs research in the areas of laser development, optical diagnostic and sensor development, photonics, and nanotechnology. He is an active researcher who currently publishes in the areas of laser chemical analysis, photonic bandgap structures, and microcavity effects. He has also done research in laser

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Page 98shock generation, quantum dot optics, nanofabrication, optical limiters for eye and sensor protection, and bio-aerosol detection and characterization. Dr. Campillo has authored over 100 refereed journal articles and 1 book, presented 150 talks at professional society meetings and has 8 patents issued or pending. He has been a member of the technical staffs of General Telephone & Electronics Laboratory, Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory and Brookhaven National Laboratory. Dr. Campillo is a fellow of the Optical Society of America and the American Physical Society and is active in the Laser Electro-optics Society of the IEEE and the American Association of Aerosol Research. He is the associate editor of the journal Optics Letters. Dr. Campillo's formal training is in electrical engineering with a B.S. degree from New Jersey Institute of Technology, an M.S. degree from Princeton University, and a Ph.D. degree from Cornell University. FRANK CRIMI is a retired vice president of Lockheed Martin Advanced Environmental Systems Company. He joined Lockheed after completing 34 years with the General Electric Company. Mr. Crimi has over 43 years of experience in the design, operations, and maintenance of nuclear power plants with emphasis on the decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities. His experience includes management of large, complex programs in the nuclear industry and construction, operation, and maintenance of naval nuclear power plants. He managed General Electric's Decommissioning Services and was the General Electric program manager for the decontamination and decommissioning of the Shippingport Atomic Power Station. Mr. Crimi has served as a member of several National Research Council committees reviewing the cost to decommission DOE's Uranium Enrichment Facilities, DOE's decontamination and decommissioning technology development program, DOE's peer review process, and DOE's policies and practices to design, procure, and manage major construction projects. Currently he is serving as a member of the committee reviewing and evaluating the Army's Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program. Mr. Crimi holds a B.S. degree in mechanical engineering from Ohio University and has done graduate work in mechanical engineering at Union College, Schenectady, New York. He is a member of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and American Nuclear Society and has written and presented several papers on the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. KEN CZERWINSKI is an assistant professor in the Department of Nuclear Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a consultant for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. His expertise is in actinide thermodynamics, environmental

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Page 99chemistry of the actinide elements, development of actinide-transactinide separations, and synthesis of inorganic complexation agents. Dr. Czerwinski has been an associate research scientist for the Institut für RadiochemieTechnische Universität München and a postdoctoral fellow of the Glenn T. Seaborg Institute for Transactinium Science at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. He has been accorded the Department of Energy's Defense Programs Early Career Scientist and Engineer Award and the Carl Richard Soderberg Professorship in Power Engineering. He is currently chair of the Norman C. Rasmussen Career Development and a consultant for the INEEL's migration of plutonium from transuranic waste areas project. Dr. Czerwinski earned his B.A. degrees in chemistry and the Russian language from Knox College in Galesburg, Illinois, and his Ph.D. in nuclear chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley. RACHEL DETWILER is principal engineer of materials research and consulting for Construction Technology Laboratories, Inc., in Skokie, Illinois. Her area of expertise is in the durability of concrete and cementbased materials used for storage of radioactive wastes. Dr. Detwiler has been involved in designing and testing a grout for the stabilization of radioactive and hazardous waste in underground storage tanks at the Savannah River Site and has participated in a range of tests on the durability of concrete. She has served as an assistant professor at the University of Toronto; postdoctoral research fellow at Norges Tekniske Hogskole, Trondheim, Norway; and design and materials engineer with ABAM Engineers, Inc. She is a member of the American Society for Testing and Materials and the American Concrete Institute where she has served as chair of Committee 227 on Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management and as a member of Committee 234 on Silica Fume in Concrete. She has received a Norges Teknisk-Naturvitenskapelige Forskningrad Fellowship and the Carlson-Polivka Fellowship and has written over 30 technical papers related to concrete microscopy, durability, and testing. Dr. Detwiler earned a B.S. degree in civil engineering, an M.S. degree in structural engineering, and her Ph.D. in civil engineering materials, all from the University of California, Berkeley. HARRY HARMON is a senior program manager for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. His expertise is in waste management, nuclear processing, separations chemistry and engineering, and implementing environmental programs and developing technology in these and related areas. His experience includes managing NUKEM's waste management and environmental remediation activities; leading tank waste programs as the vice-president of tank waste programs at M4 Environmental Management, Inc.; serving as technical director for all high-level

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Page 100waste technology development at the Westinghouse Savannah River Company; serving as Vice President of Tank Waste Remediation System Division of Westinghouse Hanford Company—the overall system required to safely manage the waste tanks and process the waste for disposal; and managing process and equipment research and development at the Savannah River Laboratory. He is a member of the American Chemical Society and Sigma Xi. He has also written or co-written a collection of articles and publications. Dr. Harmon earned a B.S. degree in chemistry from Carson-Newman College, Jefferson City, Tennessee and a Ph.D. in inorganic and nuclear chemistry from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. VINCENT MASSAUT is a project manager at the National Research Center (SCK-CEN) in Mol, Belgium, and a lecturer at the University of Liège. His expertise is in decommissioning nuclear installations. Since 1989 he has been involved in research for the pilot BR-3 reactor decommissioning project, first as an assistant to the project leader, then as project manager. He developed the first decommissioning plan for a pressurized water reactor in Belgium. He is a member of European Commission's (EC's) group of experts on D&D and waste management issues for the EC's Joint Research Centres, a member of the EC dismantling working group, and a member of the cooperative agreement on decommissioning of the OECD/NEA. Previously, Mr. Massaut was coordinator of decommissioning projects for the third and fourth 5-year programs of the EC and a member of the Decommissioning Steering Group aimed at helping the EC in defining its future policy related to R&D in decommissioning. He was selected as an IAEA expert to advise on dismantling problems, decontamination, and site restoration in Lithuania and Poland. He earned a M.S. degree in engineering with a specialization in nuclear science from the University of Liège. ALAN PENSE (NAE) is professor emeritus at the ATLSS Engineering Research Center of Lehigh University in Pennsylvania. As a specialist in physical and mechanical metallurgy he has taught undergraduate and graduate courses in general metallurgy, heat treatment, fracture, failure analysis, and failure prevention. Dr. Pense has conducted sponsored research on the properties and welding of materials for the American Iron and Steel Institute, the National Science Foundation, the Welding Research Council, the National Cooperative Highway Research Board, the U.S. Department of Transportation, and the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation. His expertise focuses on the practical application of steel metallurgy and welding technology to large structures and structural systems, including pressure vessels, bridges, buildings, nuclear components, and ships. This research has resulted in a volume

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Page 101of published work, and three of his papers have won awards from the American Welding Society. Dr. Pense consults for private industry and government agencies, including the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, major steel companies, state departments of transportation, and design and construction firms. He has received the Robinson Award from Lehigh University, the Student Council Teaching Award, the Stabler Teaching Award, the American Society for Engineering Education Western Electric Teach ing Award, and the William Hobart Medal and has been elected to the National Academy of Engineering. He has authored or co-authored some 100 articles and book chapters. Dr. Pense earned his B.S. degree in metallurgical engineering from Cornell University and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Lehigh University. GARY S. SAYLER is a professor of microbiology and ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of Tennessee. He received his Ph.D. in bacteriology and biochemistry from the University of Idaho, where he conducted research on heterotrophic turnover of organic matter in freshwater environments. This was followed by postdoctoral training in marine microbiology and biodegradation at the University of Maryland. He is the founding director of the Center for Environmental Biotechnology and director of the State Center of Excellence, the Waste Management Research and Education Institute. He has edited five books and contributed to 215 publications in broad areas of environmental microbiology, biodegradation, and biotechnology and holds patents on environmental gene probing, genetic engineering for bioremediation, and bioelectronic sensor technology. His work has included molecular and environmental aspects of PCB, PAH, BTEX, and TCE biodegradation. He has served on numerous panels and chaired advisory review committees of ORNL, NIH, DOE, EPA, and others. During his career, he has received the American Society for Microbiology Procter and Gamble Award for Environmental Microbiology, the Distinguished Alumni Award of the University of Idaho, and the Dow Chemical Foundation SPERE Award. He has been elected to the American Academy of Microbiology. He has served in an editorial capacity for six journals and is currently an editor for Environmental Science and Technology. Professional memberships include American Association for the Advancement of Science, American Chemical Society, and a few others. Dr. Sayler is a member of the Water Environment Research Foundation, Research Council. DELBERT TESAR holds the Carol Cockrell Curran Chair in Engineering and is professor of mechanical engineering at the University of Texas at Austin and is director of the Robotics Research Group there. His expertise is in robotics, intelligent mechanical systems, and the interactive

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Page 102design of such systems. He has pursued research in the machine systems field for 40 years and has graduated 45 Ph.D.'s and 125 M.Sc.s with theses. Recent work has concentrated on a full architecture for intelligent actuators, which as standard building blocks can be assembled on demand into an open architecture system (from 10 to 40 degrees of freedom), all operated by one universal software system. He has been a member of the Air Force Review Committee for the MANTECH Program, the Air Force Science Advisory Board, three national review panels on robotics for National Institute of Science and Technology and NASA, and served on a standing review committee of the National Research Council on the space station. Dr. Tesar earned both his B.S. degree in mechanical engineering and his M.S. degree in engineering mechanics from the University of Nebraska and his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology.