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This biennial symposium promotes the technical exchange of naval research developments of common interest to all the countries of the world. The forum encourages both formal and informal discussion of presented papers, and the occasion provides an opportunity for direct communication between international peers. More than 140 participants, including students, from 25 countries attended the symposium. Sixty-three papers were presented in the ten topical areas covered by the symposium. Those topical areas are wave-induced motions and loads, hydrodynamics in ship design, propulsor hydrodynamics and hydroacoustics, CFD validation, viscous ship hydrodynamics, cavitation and bubbly flow, wave hydrodynamics, wake dynamics, shallow water hydrodynamics, and fluid dynamics in the naval context. These topical areas were chosen because they encompass recent scientific advances. For example, first-ever experimental results crucial for validating software for modeling unsteady turbulent flow were presented for a combatant in head waves. Another paper described the successful use of sophisticated large eddy simulation computations to predict the pressure recovery in a submarine launch way. A third discussed the use of experimentally validated large eddy simulations to understand the physics underlying nonstationary quantities for the hydrodynamic flow over a lifting surface. This brief list illustrates the quality and timeliness of the information presented in the symposium. Opening comments were delivered on the first morning by Ronald D.Taylor (Naval Studies Board), Admiral François Lefaudeux (Bassin d'Essais des Carènes), and RADM Jay M.Cohen, USN (Chief of Naval Research). The symposium featured invited lectures each morning. These lectures were presented by Robert Beck, Didier Frechou, Fred Stern, and Marshall Tulin and covered seakeeping computations, propulsor hydroacoustics, software verification and validation, and wave breaking. At mid-week, the Twenty-First Georg Weinblum Lecture was delivered by B.Molin, who spoke on the topic “Numerical and Physical Wavetanks: Making Them Fit” (not included in this proceedings). These lectures by prominent international experts set the pace for the technical sessions that followed throughout each day. The success of this symposium is the result of diligence on the part of many people. There was, of course, the Organizing and Paper Selection Committee consisting of myself and Dr. Patrick Purtell (Office of Naval Research), Mr. James Fein (Naval Sea Systems Command), Dr. Ronald Taylor (National Research Council), Dr. Stephane Cordier (Bassin d'Essais des Carènes), Dr. William Morgan (David Taylor Model Basin), Dr. Choung Lee (Pohang University of Science and Technology), and Prof. Robert Beck (Journal of Ship Research). The work of this committee was certainly the cornerstone for the success of the symposium. The administrative preparation and execution, and the production of this archival volume, were completed with the support of Susan Campbell and Mary Gordon of the Naval Studies Board, National Research Council. Special appreciation is extended to Jennifer McDonald and Diane McNeil, from my office, for handling the abstract collection and the preparation of the discussion sections. The staff of Bassin d'Essais des Carènes is to be congratulated for hosting this exemplary meeting. Their care for the well-being of the participants is greatly appreciated. Further appreciation is extended to Pulsar Developpment, which provided essential onsite administrative and organizational support. For this program officer, the symposium marked the end of a thirty-seven-year career in naval hydrodynamics. I am very proud of the reputation of this symposium series and of the associated proceedings, which are recognized internationally as the equivalent of a peer-reviewed journal and which for more than a half century have served as the document repository for leading-edge research in naval. hydrodynamics. I wish the best for the research community as it embraces the challenges of the 21st century. Edwin P.Rood Office of Naval Research the authoritative version for attribution.

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The brochure for this twenty-third symposium invites us to “a week of exchange, debates, and sharing of experiences in the field of Naval hydrodynamics”—a worthy and necessary goal indeed! My personal experience started thirty-six years ago, when as a boy of seventeen I left home and entered the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis. I joined the Navy to see the world (places and people), to drive submarines at sea, and to design future ships when ashore. I did not realize at the time how fulfilling and challenging my choices would be. At Annapolis I studied naval architecture. I was enamored with the idea of placing a blank sheet of paper on a drafting table, using flexible plastic batons and lead-weighted ducks to hold the baton down in place while I used a pencil to draw a new hull form on the paper. What personal freedom of design and power: it was science, engineering, and art all in one. Computers of the day available to me couldn't compete with my mind, eye, and hand. The Naval Academy tow tank was small, simple, and reliable, and free to use if I helped the technical assistant with his chores. Models were pulled at consistent force by a cable and a weight that fell down a shaft equal to the length of the tank. Gravity was constant. The weights and models varied. None of my line drawings became actual ships and I didn't make any hydrodynamic breakthroughs as a result of my tow tank work, but I learned about ships, propulsion, seakeeping, and experimentation—and it was fun! Science should be fun. As a midshipman I spent two summers at sea. Once as a junior midshipman performing all the menial chores of a deck hand, cook, and engineer on the Coast Guard sail-training barque Eagle, I sailed from Connecticut, through the Panama Canal, and ended up after two weeks in Seattle. What an experience to run before a storm with all twenty-two sails straining and the lee sail awash as the Eagle moved smoothly through the water at her maximum hull speed. My second cruise was on a World War II vintage diesel electric submarine out of San Diego. The captain of that ship was experienced, confident, and a great officer and mariner. He allowed the five young midshipmen on board to drive his boat, learn by making or nearly making mistakes, and then learn some more. That submarine was my first experience with electric ship propulsion, but a far cry from the all-electric ships the United States Navy is designing today. Some of you know that submarine's commanding officer, then a lieutenant commander—he is Rear Admiral Brad Mooney, a retired former Chief of Naval Research. I would not be here if it were not for his inspiration. For those wondering when the “expressive” portion of this talk will end and begin to focus more on the specifics and challenges of hydrodynamics, just one more sea story. After two years at sea on a diesel submarine as an ensign in the Navy, I attended MIT and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. I studied naval architecture, marine engineering, and ocean engineering. It was 1970, and computers were just beginning to be used for seakeeping and computational fluid dynamics. Most of my textbooks were mimeographed copies of professors' class notes—professors, I might add, who came from all around the world, like the participants in this symposium. MIT has a sophisticated medium-sized tow tank that I used for my thesis work, the recovery of submersibles through the air-sea interface in a seaway. While computers were being used even then, tank testing remained essential for accurate validation of full-scale ship characteristics before ship production. One of the dangers of inviting an old naval officer to speak is that he has many more sea stories than a junior officer. I won't bore you any longer. It is most appropriate that this symposium is being held in France. Both the United States and the French Republic were born of revolution. Today we are experiencing a revolution in ship design, construction, and operation. And your efforts have made it possible, with enormous gains still ahead. Computers of incredible sophistication, power, and speed, available at affordable prices, have made into a worldwide reality what were previously only imagined hull forms, propulsors, materials, navigational accuracy, maintenance and performance monitoring and prediction, and sophisticated damage control in minimally manned, highly automated ships. I may be nostalgic for hand-drawn ship plans and sailing ships, but the reality and future possi-bilities are far more exciting and challenging. the authoritative version for attribution. We must rise to that challenge! There is still much to learn. People still program the computers, and despite our best efforts to model complex hydrodynamic effects such as turbulence, boundary-layer

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About this PDF file: This new digital representation of the original work has been recomposed from XML files created from the original paper book, not from the original typesetting files. Page breaks are true to the original; line lengths, word breaks, heading styles, and other typesetting-specific formatting, however, cannot be retained, and some typographic errors may have been accidentally inserted. Please use the print version of this publication as TECHNICAL SESSIONS xiii Instability of Partial Cavitation: A Numerical/Experimental Approach R.Arndt,1 C.Song,1 M.Kjeldsen,2 J.He,1 A.Keller3 (1University of Minnesota, USA, 2Norwegian Uni- versity of Science and Technology, Norway, 3Technical University of Munich, Germany) An Unsteady 3-D Euler Solver Coupled with a Cavitating Propeller Analysis Method J.-K.Choi, S.Kinnas (University of Texas at Austin, USA) On the Flow Structure, Tip Leakage Cavitation Inception and Associated Noise S.Gopalan,1 H.Liu,2 J.Katz1 (1Johns Hopkins University, 2Naval Surface Warfare Center, USA) An Experimental Investigation of Cavitation Inception and Development of Partial Sheet Cavities on Two- Dimensional Hydrofoils J.Astolfi, P.Dorange, J.-B.Leroux, J.-Y.Billard (Institut de Recherche de l'Ecole Navale, France) Modeling 3D Unsteady Sheet Cavities Using a Coupled UnRANS-BEM Code G.Chahine, C.-T.Hsiao (Dynaflow, Inc., USA) Wake Dynamics Ship Wake Detectability in the Ocean Turbulent Environment A.Benilov, G.Bang (Stevens Institute of Technology, USA) A.Safray, I.Tkachenko (Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia) An Experimental and Computational Study of the Effects of Propulsion on the Free-Surface Flow Astern of Model 5415 T.Ratcliffe (Naval Surface Warfare Center, Carderock Division, USA) Wave Hydrodynamics Keynote: Breaking Waves in the Ocean and Around Ships M.Tulin (University of California at Santa Barbara, USA) M.Landrini (Istituto Nazionale per Studi ed Esperienze di Architettura Navale, Italy) Numerical and Experimental Study of the Wave Breaking Generated by a Submerged Hydrofoil A.Iafrati, A.Olivieri, F.Pistani, E.Campana (Istituto Nazionale per Studi ed Esperienze di Architettura Navale Italy) The Numerical Simulation of Ship Waves Using Cartesian Grid Methods M.Sussman (Flordia State University, USA) D.Dommermuth (Science Applications International Cor- poration, USA) Radiation Loads on a Cylinder Oscillating in Pycnocline E.Ermanyuk, N.Gavrilov, I.Sturova (Lavrentyev Institute of Hydrodynamics, Russia) Wave Resistance Computations—A Comparison of Different Approaches S.Gatchell, D.Hafermann, G.Jensen, J.Marzi, M.Vogt (Hamburgische Schiffbau Versuchsanstalt GmbH, Germany) Computation of Nonlinear Turbulent Free Surface Flows Using the Parallel Uncle Code M.Beddhu, R.Pankajakshan, M.-Y.Jiang, M.Remotigue, C.Sheng, L.Taylor, W.Briley, D.Whitfield (Mississippi State University, USA) Fluid Dynamics in the Naval Context the authoritative version for attribution.

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About this PDF file: This new digital representation of the original work has been recomposed from XML files created from the original paper book, not from the original typesetting files. Page breaks are true to the original; line lengths, word breaks, heading styles, and other typesetting-specific formatting, however, cannot be retained, and some typographic errors may have been accidentally inserted. Please use the print version of this publication as TECHNICAL SESSIONS xiv Submarine Maneuverability Assessment Using Computational Fluid Dynamic Tools D.Bellevre, A.Diaz de Tuesta, P.Perdon (Bassin d'Essais des Carènes, France) Simulation of UUV Recovery Hydrodynamics S.Huyer, J.Grant (Naval Undersea Warfare Center, USA) Reynolds-Averaged Modeling of High-Froude-Number Free-Surface Jets D.Walker (ERIM International, Inc., USA) Viscous Ship Hydrodynamics On Roll Hydrodynamics of Cylinders Fitted with Bilge Keels R.Yeung, D.Roddier, S.-W.Liao (University of California at Berkeley, USA) B.Alessandrini, L.Gentaz (Ecole Centrale de Nantes, France) Combining Accuracy and Efficiency with Robustness in Ship Stern Flow Computation A.van der Ploeg,1 L.Eça, 2 M.Hoekstra1 (1Maritime Research Institute, The Netherlands, Instituto Supe- rior Técnico, Portugal) An Unstructured Multielement Solution Algorithm for Complex Geometry Hydrodynamic Simulations D.Hyams, K.Sreenivas, C.Sheng, S.Nichols, L.Taylor, W.Briley, D.Marcum, D.Whitfield (Mississippi State University, USA) Ship Stern Flow Calculations on Overlapping Composite Grids B.Regnström,1 L.Broberg,1 L.Larsson1,2 (1FLOWTECH International AB, 2Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden) Study on the Prediction of Flow Characteristics Around a Ship Hull K.-S.Min, J.Choi, D.Yum, K.Chung, B.Chang, S.Chung, B.Han (Hyundai Heavy Industries, Korea) Shallow Water Hydrodynamics Analysis of Turbulence Free-Surface Flow Around Hulls in Shallow-water Channel by a Level-Set Method H.Chun, I.Park, S.Lee (Pusan National University, Korea) A Design Tool for High Speed Ferries Washes D.Aelbrecht (Laboratoire National d'Hydraulique et Environnement, France) J.-C.Dern (Oceanide BGO/First, France), Y.Doutreleau (Bassin d'Essais des Carènes, France) Flow Around Ships Sailing in Shallow Water—Experimental and Numerical Results X.-N.Chen, A.Gronarz, S.List (Versuchsanstalt für Binnenschiffbau e.V. Duisburg, Germany) N.Stuntz (Gerhard-Mercator-Universität Duisburg, Germany) Slup Stability Study in the Coastal Region: New Coastal Wave Model Coupled with a Dynamic Stability Model R.-Q.Lin, W.Thomas (Naval Surface Warfare Center, Carderock Division, USA) Waves and Forces Caused by Oscillation of a Floating Body Determined Through a Unified Nonlinear Shallow-Water Theory R.Henn, T.Jiang, S.Sharma (Mercator University, Germany) the authoritative version for attribution.

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About this PDF file: This new digital representation of the original work has been recomposed from XML files created from the original paper book, not from the original typesetting files. Page breaks are true to the original; line lengths, word breaks, heading styles, and other typesetting-specific formatting, however, cannot be retained, and some typographic errors may have been accidentally inserted. Please use the print version of this publication as LIST OF ATTENDEES xv LIST OF ATTENDEES AUSTRALIA Lawrence J.Doctors Jinzhu Xia The University of New South Wales University of Western Australia AUSTRIA Vienna Model Basin Gerhard Strasser BELGIUM Von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics Phillipe Planquart CANADA Chi-Chao Hsiung National Research Council, Canada Dal Tech, Dalhousie University Wei Qui David C.Murdey Martec Limited CHINA Forng-Chen Chiu Yan-Hua Lin National Taiwan University, Taiwan National Taiwan University, Taiwan Shean-Kwang Chou Lian-Di Zhou United Ship Design and Development Center China Ship Scientific Research Center DENMARK Poul Andersen Technical University of Denmark Technical University of Denmark Jorgen V.Jensen Harry Bingham Technical University of Denmark FINLAND Harri Soininen Antonio Sánchez-Caja VTT Manufacturing Technology VTT Manufacturing Technology FRANCE Jacques-Andre Astolfi Lawrence Briancon-Marjollet Institut de Recherche de l'Ecole Navale Bassin d'Essais des Carènes Malik Ba Alain Cariou Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Méchanique et Aérotechnique Institut de Recherche de la Construction Navale David Bellevre Xia-Bo Chen Bassin d'Essais des Carènes Bureau Veritas, DTO Jean-Yves Billard Alain Clément Institut de Recherche de l'Ecole Navale Ecole National Superieure Mécanique Jean Philippe Boin Stephane Cordier the authoritative version for attribution. CEAT, Université de Poitiers Bassin d'Essais des Carènes Christophe Bouvier Jean-Claude Dern DCN Oceanide BGO/First

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About this PDF file: This new digital representation of the original work has been recomposed from XML files created from the original paper book, not from the original typesetting files. Page breaks are true to the original; line lengths, word breaks, heading styles, and other typesetting-specific formatting, however, cannot be retained, and some typographic errors may have been accidentally inserted. Please use the print version of this publication as LIST OF ATTENDEES xvii Italian Navy JAPAN University of Tokyo Mitsuhisa Ikehata Kuniharu Nakatake Yokohama National University Kyushu University Hiroshi Kagemoto Makoto Ohkusu University of Tokyo Kyushu University Masashi Kashiwagi Ryuchi Sato Kyushu University Japan Defense Agency Hiroharu Kato Yusuke Tahara University of Tokyo Osaka Prefecture University Takeshi Kinoshita Kinya Tamura University of Tokyo Nagasaki Institute of Applied Science Ohashi Kunihide Yoshitaka Ukon Kyushu University Ship Research Institute Ryuji Miyake Hironori Yasukawa University of Tokyo Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Hideaki Miyata KOREA Pusan National University Jung-Eun Choi Seung-Il Yang Hundai Maritime Research Institute Korea Research Institute of Ships and Ocean Engineering Ho Hwan Chun D.Yum Pusan National University Hundai Maritime Research Institute Il Ryong Park THE NETHERLANDS E.F.G.van Daalen Maritime Research Institute Maritime Research Institute Seng Gie Tan A.van der Ploeg Maritime Research Institute NORWAY Marilena Greco Bjornar Pettersen Norwegian University of Science and Technology Norwegian University of Science and Technology Jens Bloch Helmers Toenness Rune Det Norske Veritas Schlumberger Kazumori Masabayashi Rong Zhao Nordic Water Supply Marine Technology Center POLAND Zbigniew Karpinski Jan Dudziak Ship Design and Research Center the authoritative version for attribution.

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About this PDF file: This new digital representation of the original work has been recomposed from XML files created from the original paper book, not from the original typesetting files. Page breaks are true to the original; line lengths, word breaks, heading styles, and other typesetting-specific formatting, however, cannot be retained, and some typographic errors may have been accidentally inserted. Please use the print version of this publication as LIST OF ATTENDEES xix Naval Undersea Warfare Center, Newport L.Patrick Purtell Joseph Katz Office of Naval Research Johns Hopkins University Toby Ratcliffe Ki-han Kim Naval Surface Warfare Center, Carderock Naval Surface Warfare Center, Carderock Edwin P.Rood Spyros A.Kinnas Office of Naval Research University of Texas at Austin Charles C.Song In-Young Koh University of Minnesota Naval Surface Warfare Center, Carderock Frederick Stern Paul Lefebvre University of Iowa Naval Undersea Warfare Center, Newport Chao-Ho Sung Spiro Lekoudis Naval Surface Warfare Center, Carderock Office of Naval Research Mark Sussman Cheng-Wen Lin Florida State University Naval Surface Warfare Center, Carderock Ronald D.Taylor Ray-Qing Lin National Research Council Naval Surface Warfare Center, Carderock Chon-Yin Tsai Wen-Chin Lin Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company Naval Surface Warfare Center, Carderock Marshall Tulin Jules W.Lindau University of California at Santa Barbara Pennsylvania State University David T.Walker Peter Majumdar ERIM International, Inc. Office of Naval Research, London Chi Yang William B.Morgan George Mason University Naval Surface Warfare Center, Carderock Ronald W.Yeung Ramesh Pankajakshan University of California at Berkeley Mississippi State University the authoritative version for attribution.