Appendixes



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Embedded, Everywhere: A Research Agenda for Networked Systems of Embedded Computers Appendixes

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Embedded, Everywhere: A Research Agenda for Networked Systems of Embedded Computers This page intentionally left blank.

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Embedded, Everywhere: A Research Agenda for Networked Systems of Embedded Computers A Biographies of Committee Members DEBORAH L. ESTRIN, Chair, is a professor of computer science at the University of California at Los Angeles and a visiting scholar at the University of Southern California’s Information Sciences Institute. She is recognized for her research in computer networks and internetworking, protocol design, scalability, and multicast routing. Her current research focuses on the design of protocols for large-scale wireless sensor networks. Dr. Estrin served as chair of the 1998 DARPA Information Science and Technology study on simple systems, whose focus was networked embedded computers. She has participated in a number of CSTB studies, including those that produced the reports Evolving the High-Performance Computing and Communications Initiative to Support the Nation’s Information Infrastructure, The Changing Nature of Telecommunications Infrastructure, Academic Careers for Experimental Computer Scientists and Engineers, and The Internet’s Coming of Age. Dr. Estrin holds a B.S. in electrical engineering from the University of California at Berkeley and an M.S. in technology and policy and a Ph.D. in electrical engineering and computer science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She was selected as a Presidential Young Investigator (1987) and is a fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery (2000) and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (2001). GAETANO BORRIELLO is a professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Washington. He received his Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley in 1988 and was

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Embedded, Everywhere: A Research Agenda for Networked Systems of Embedded Computers employed at the Xerox Palo Alto Research Center in the early 1980s. His current research interests focus on the design, development, and deployment of embedded systems, with particular emphasis on mobile and ubiquitous devices and the applications they will support. He is also interested in system development environments, user interfaces, and networking. These interests are unified by their goal of making new computing and communication devices that simplify life by being as invisible as possible to their owners; being highly specialized and thus highly efficient for the task at hand; and being able to exploit their connections to each other and to the greater worldwide networks. Dr. Borriello is currently director of Intel’s Seattle Research Laboratory and is active on the program committees of several conferences and workshops on system-level design topics. In addition, he recently served as program chair and general chair of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)/Association of Computing Machinery (ACM)/ International Federation for Information Processing (IFIP) International Workshop of Hardware/Software Codesign (1998) and the UW/Microsoft Research Summer Institute on the Technologies of Invisible Computing (1999). He is a member of the IEEE Computer Society and the ACM Special Interest Group on Design Automation. ROBERT PAUL COLWELL led Intel’s architecture development effort for the P6 microarchitecture (the core of Intel’s Pentium II and Pentium III processors) and managed the Pentium 4 microarchitecture development. Dr. Colwell joined Intel in 1990 as a senior architect on the Pentium Pro project and became manager of the Architecture Group 2 years later. In 1996 he was elected an Intel fellow, the highest rung on Intel’s technical career ladder. From 1985 through 1990, Dr. Colwell was a CPU architect at VLIW pioneer Multiflow Computer. From 1980 to 1985 he worked part-time as a hardware design engineer at workstation vendor Perq Systems while attending graduate school at Carnegie Mellon University’s Electrical and Computer Engineering Department. He was a member of the technical staff at the Bell Telephone Labs from 1977 to 1980, working on the BellMac series of microprocessors. Dr. Colwell received his BSEE from the University of Pittsburgh in 1977, his MSEE from Carnegie Mellon University in 1978, and his Ph.D. from Carnegie Mellon University in 1985. He holds 44 patents. JERRY FIDDLER is founder and chairman of Wind River Systems, the world leader in embedded software and operating systems. Wind River’s software is widely used in applications from the very high tech (the operating system for the Mars Pathfinder) to the very high volume (Hewlett-Packard printers, General Motors engine controllers, Kodak digital cam-

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Embedded, Everywhere: A Research Agenda for Networked Systems of Embedded Computers eras, and Nortel telephones). As chairman, Mr. Fiddler provides technical oversight and guidance, travels and communicates widely within the embedded community, and is a prominent industry expert and spokes-person. He is on the board of Crossbow Technology, a private company making MEMS-based sensors, and serves on other corporate boards as well. He is a fellow of the Lester Center for Entrepreneurship at the University of California at Berkeley. Mr. Fiddler holds an M.S. degree in computer science and a B.A. in music and photography from the University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana. He served as a senior computer scientist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory from 1978 to 1981, when he founded Wind River Systems. MARK HOROWITZ is director of the Computer Systems Laboratory at Stanford University and is the Yahoo Founder’s Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. Dr. Horowitz received his B.S. and M.S. in electrical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1978 and his Ph.D. from Stanford University in 1984. Since 1984, he has been a professor at Stanford in the area of digital system design. His work in this area is quite broad, ranging from circuit design to multiprocessor architecture. While at Stanford he has led a number of processor designs, including MIPS-X, one of the first processors to include an on-chip instruction cache; Torch, a statically scheduled, superscalar processor that supported speculation; and Flash, a flexible, distributed shared memory multiprocessor. He has also worked in a number of other chip design areas, including high-speed memory design, high-bandwidth interfaces, and fast floating point. In 1990 he took leave from Stanford to help start Rambus, Inc., a company designing high-bandwidth memory interface technology. His current research projects include work in high-speed IO, low-power VLSI design, VLSI computer architecture, and new graphics IO devices. WILLIAM J. KAISER is chief technology officer and vice president of research and development at Sensoria Corporation and professor in the Electrical Engineering Department of the University of California, Los Angeles. He and his team developed Wireless Integrated Network Sensors (WINS), the first distributed embedded computing technology for “Internetworking and the Physical World.” Sensoria, founded in 1998, is a rapidly growing company that provides end-to-end WINS solutions for wireless network access to distributed vehicles and embedded systems, sensors, and controls. His background includes distributed wireless sensing and computing, low-power analog and digital electronics, and low-power RF communication systems. Dr. Kaiser received a Ph.D. in solid-state physics from Wayne State University in 1984. His graduate research

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Embedded, Everywhere: A Research Agenda for Networked Systems of Embedded Computers at Ford Motor Company included the development of automotive sensor technology ranging from the development of measurement methods, through circuits, structures, and materials, to large-volume commercial sensor production. In 1986, Dr. Kaiser joined the staff of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), where he initiated the NASA Microinstrument Program. In 1994, he joined the faculty of the University of California at Los Angeles Electrical Engineering Department, where he served as chairman of the department from 1996 through 2000. His awards include the Allied Signal Faculty Research Award, the Peter Mark Award of the American Vacuum Society, the NASA Medal for Exceptional Scientific Achievement, and the Arch Colwell Best Paper Award of the Society of Automotive Engineers. Dr. Kaiser has over 100 publications, 100 invited presentations, and 21 patents. NANCY G. LEVESON is professor of aerospace software engineering in the Aeronautics and Astronautics Department and also professor of engineering systems at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Previously she was Boeing Professor of Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Washington. She has served as editor in chief of IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering and on the board of directors of the International Council on Systems Engineering. Dr. Leveson is a fellow of the ACM and is currently an elected member of the Board of Directors of the Computing Research Association, a member of the ACM Committee on Computers and Public Policy, and a member of the National Research Council’s Advisory Committee for the Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences. She received the 1995 AIAA Information Systems Award for “developing the field of software safety and for promoting responsible software and system engineering practices where life and property are at stake.” She is author of a book, Safeware: System Safety and Computers, published by Addison-Wesley. Dr. Leveson is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and was awarded the 1999 ACM Alan Newell Award. BARBARA H. LISKOV is the Ford Professor of Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Her research interests lie in the areas of programming methodology, programming languages, and programming systems, and she has done research on data abstraction, program specifications, object-oriented programming, concurrency control, fault tolerance, parallel and distributed programs, and algorithms for distributed systems. Her projects include the design and implementation of CLU, the first programming language to support data abstraction; the design and implementation of Argus, the first high-level language to support implementation of distributed programs; and the Thor object-oriented database

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Embedded, Everywhere: A Research Agenda for Networked Systems of Embedded Computers system, which provides transactional access to highly available objects in a wide-scale, distributed environment. Professor Liskov is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and of the Association for Computing Machinery. She received the 1996 Achievement Award from the Society of Women Engineers. Professor Liskov has published more than 100 technical papers and is the author of several books, including Program Development in Java, which was recently published by Addison-Wesley. PETER LUCAS is chief executive officer of MAYA Design, which he cofounded in 1989. He has guided the growth of MAYA as a premier venue for interdisciplinary product design and research, serving both the private and public sectors. Dr. Lucas received his Ph.D. in 1981 from Cornell University, where he studied educational and cognitive psychology and psycholinguistics. He did postdoctoral research at the University of Wisconsin and was a Sloan postdoctoral fellow in cognitive science at Carnegie Mellon University. His research interests lie at the intersection of computer architecture and product design. He is currently focused on developing a distributed architecture for ubiquitous computing that is designed to scale to nearly unlimited size, depending primarily on market forces to maintain tractability and global coherence. He holds 13 patents and has coauthored a book on letter and word perception. He was founding chair of Three Rivers Connect, an initiative of business and civic leaders that promotes the development of “civic computing” in the Pittsburgh region. He sits on a number of boards in both the public and private sectors. He is adjunct associate professor in the Human-Computer Interaction Institute of Carnegie Mellon University. DAVID P. MAHER is chief technology officer of InterTrust. He previously served as head of the secure systems research department at AT&T Labs. He has a Ph.D. in mathematics from Lehigh University, and he has taught electrical engineering, mathematics, and computer science at several institutions. He joined Bell Labs in 1981, where he developed secure wide-band transmission systems, cryptographic key management systems, and secure voice, fax, and data devices. He was chief architect for AT&T’s STU-III secure voice, data, and video products, used by the President and DOD officials for top secret communications. Dr. Maher was made an AT&T fellow for his work in communications security. He has published papers in the fields of combinatorics, cryptography, number theory, signal processing, and electronic commerce. He has been a consultant for the National Science Foundation, the National Security Agency, the National Institute of Standards and Technology, and the congressional Office of Technology Assessment. Recently, Dr. Maher has been

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Embedded, Everywhere: A Research Agenda for Networked Systems of Embedded Computers doing research on electronic payment systems and the protection of intellectual property distributed over the Internet. PAUL M. MANKIEWICH is presently head of the Wireless Technology Research Department at Lucent Technologies. He is also Wireless Research Hardware and Architecture Director in the Wireless Network Group business unit and in that role is responsible for shepherding research technology into wireless products. His research department has responsibility for novel wireless system and radio architectures, adaptive antenna technologies, and radio and modem technologies for next-generation wireless data and voice networks. His group has been responsible for a diverse set of programs such as a steered-beam, next-generation, fixed wireless system, various issues regarding system improvements through baseband signal processing, algorithms for cellular network optimization, 3G wireless system architectures, and system-level issues regarding home networking and BlueTooth. He joined Bell Labs in 1981. He received his Ph.D. from Boston University in applied physics. He began working in wireless in 1988. Since then he has been involved in and responsible for all aspects of wireless system and radio design. RICHARD TAYLOR is a principal scientist at Hewlett-Packard Laboratories, where he leads research programs in the areas of embedded systems analysis and design, distributed media processing, systems architecture, and hardware-software codesign. Dr. Taylor graduated with a B.Sc. (honors) in computing and cybernetics from the University of Kent at Canterbury, England, and a Ph.D. in computer systems engineering from the University of Manchester. Following his Ph.D., he worked for the Christian Michelsen Institute (Bergen, Norway) as a computer scientist, combining research and consultancy in the area of high-performance distributed and parallel computing. He joined the electronic systems department of the University of York in 1989, founded and then led the computer systems engineering group, concentrating on the design and development of novel embedded and real-time systems. In 1993 he joined the departments of computer science and electrical engineering at the University of Western Michigan, again leading a team researching the design and application of high-performance embedded computing systems. He joined Hewlett-Packard in 1995. Dr. Taylor has published more than 50 papers and patents in the areas of embedded, parallel, and distributed computing. JIM WALDO is a Distinguished Engineer with Sun Microsystems, where he is the lead architect for Jini, a distributed programming system based on Java. Before that, he worked in JavaSoft and Sun Microsystems Labo-

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Embedded, Everywhere: A Research Agenda for Networked Systems of Embedded Computers ratories, where he did research in the areas of object-oriented programming and systems, distributed computing, and user environments. Before joining Sun, Dr. Waldo spent 8 years at Apollo Computer and Hewlett Packard working in distributed object systems, user interfaces, class libraries, text, and internationalization. While at HP, he led the design and development of the first Object Request Broker and was instrumental in getting that technology incorporated into the first OMG CORBA specification. He edited the book The Evolution of C++: Language Design in the Marketplace of Ideas (MIT Press) and was the author of the Java Advisor column in Unix Review’s Performance Computing magazine. Dr. Waldo is an adjunct faculty member of Harvard University, where he teaches distributed computing in the department of computer science. He received his Ph.D. in philosophy from the University of Massachusetts (Amherst). He also holds M.A. degrees in both linguistics and philosophy from the University of Utah. He is a member of the IEEE and ACM.