Appendix B
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Robert R.Everett (Chair), a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE), is retired president and chief executive officer (CEO) of the MITRE Corporation; he is currently an honorary trustee and a member of MITRE’s board of directors. In 1989, Mr. Everett, a pioneer in the development of digital computers, was awarded the National Medal of Technology by President Bush for his work in real-time computer technologies and applications. Mr. Everett received a B.S. from Duke University and an M.S. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He was a member of the Defense Science Board (DSB) from 1987 to 1993 and chair of the DSB from 1988 to 1989. He has served as a senior scientist of the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board and as chairman of the Federal Aviation Administration’s Research, Engineering, and Development Committee. He is also a member of the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization’s Advisory Committee.

Gordon R.England (Vice Chair, September 1999 to May 2001) resigned from his position as vice chair of the study in May 2001 due to his nomination and eventual acceptance as Secretary of the Navy. At that time he was executive vice president of General Dynamics Corporation. Mr. England began his 38-year career as an engineer with Honeywell, where he worked on the Gemini space program. He was also a program manager on the E-2C program with Litton Industries. Mr. England first joined General Dynamics in October 1966 as an avionics design engineer with the company’s airplane division in Fort Worth, Texas. After holding various engineering and management positions with the Fort Worth division, he became president and an executive vice president of the corporation in January 1991. When the Fort Worth division was sold to Lockheed in March 1993, he became the president of Lockheed Fort Worth. He retired in 1995 and directed his own consulting business, GRE Consulting Inc., which deals primarily with mergers and acquisitions. He returned to General Dynamics in 1997. Mr. England has a B.S. in electrical engineering from the University of Maryland and an M.B.A. from Texas Christian University.

Kyle T.Alfriend, a member of the NAE, has had a varied career in academia, government, and industry. Currently a professor and head of the Aerospace Engineering Department at Texas A&M University, Dr. Alfriend has previously worked at Lockheed Missiles and Space, GRC International, the Central Intelligent Agency, the Naval Research Laboratory, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Cornell University, and the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey as a visiting professor. He has been an editor of many magazines and is currently a member of the Aerospace Industries Association, American Astronautical Society, American Society for Engineering Education, and National Space Society and a fellow of the Society for Engineering Science. His areas of interest include formation-flying satellites, characterization of orbit uncertainty, cataloging of space debris, and autonomous rendezvous and docking.

Oliver C.Boileau, Jr., a member of NAE, was president and CEO of the Grumman Corporation, a subsidiary of Northrop-Grumman. He retired in 1995. During Mr. Boileau’s career, he held numerous high-level positions, such as president of Boeing Aerospace and president of General Dynamics. He is currently a private consultant to industry and a member of numerous societies and honorary organizations. He has served on the DSB and many other government boards. Mr. Boileau has a BSEE and MSEE from the University of Pennsylvania and an M.S. in industrial management from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

Michael P.C.Carns, General, U.S. Air Force (Ret), was vice chief of staff of the Air Force prior to his retirement. During his career, General Carns served in a variety of operational and management positions and is well versed in the problems facing the defense industry in retaining talented



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Review of the Future of the U.S. Aerospace Infrastructure and Aerospace Engineering Disciplines to Meet the Needs of the Air Force and the Department of Defense Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Robert R.Everett (Chair), a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE), is retired president and chief executive officer (CEO) of the MITRE Corporation; he is currently an honorary trustee and a member of MITRE’s board of directors. In 1989, Mr. Everett, a pioneer in the development of digital computers, was awarded the National Medal of Technology by President Bush for his work in real-time computer technologies and applications. Mr. Everett received a B.S. from Duke University and an M.S. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He was a member of the Defense Science Board (DSB) from 1987 to 1993 and chair of the DSB from 1988 to 1989. He has served as a senior scientist of the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board and as chairman of the Federal Aviation Administration’s Research, Engineering, and Development Committee. He is also a member of the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization’s Advisory Committee. Gordon R.England (Vice Chair, September 1999 to May 2001) resigned from his position as vice chair of the study in May 2001 due to his nomination and eventual acceptance as Secretary of the Navy. At that time he was executive vice president of General Dynamics Corporation. Mr. England began his 38-year career as an engineer with Honeywell, where he worked on the Gemini space program. He was also a program manager on the E-2C program with Litton Industries. Mr. England first joined General Dynamics in October 1966 as an avionics design engineer with the company’s airplane division in Fort Worth, Texas. After holding various engineering and management positions with the Fort Worth division, he became president and an executive vice president of the corporation in January 1991. When the Fort Worth division was sold to Lockheed in March 1993, he became the president of Lockheed Fort Worth. He retired in 1995 and directed his own consulting business, GRE Consulting Inc., which deals primarily with mergers and acquisitions. He returned to General Dynamics in 1997. Mr. England has a B.S. in electrical engineering from the University of Maryland and an M.B.A. from Texas Christian University. Kyle T.Alfriend, a member of the NAE, has had a varied career in academia, government, and industry. Currently a professor and head of the Aerospace Engineering Department at Texas A&M University, Dr. Alfriend has previously worked at Lockheed Missiles and Space, GRC International, the Central Intelligent Agency, the Naval Research Laboratory, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Cornell University, and the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey as a visiting professor. He has been an editor of many magazines and is currently a member of the Aerospace Industries Association, American Astronautical Society, American Society for Engineering Education, and National Space Society and a fellow of the Society for Engineering Science. His areas of interest include formation-flying satellites, characterization of orbit uncertainty, cataloging of space debris, and autonomous rendezvous and docking. Oliver C.Boileau, Jr., a member of NAE, was president and CEO of the Grumman Corporation, a subsidiary of Northrop-Grumman. He retired in 1995. During Mr. Boileau’s career, he held numerous high-level positions, such as president of Boeing Aerospace and president of General Dynamics. He is currently a private consultant to industry and a member of numerous societies and honorary organizations. He has served on the DSB and many other government boards. Mr. Boileau has a BSEE and MSEE from the University of Pennsylvania and an M.S. in industrial management from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Michael P.C.Carns, General, U.S. Air Force (Ret), was vice chief of staff of the Air Force prior to his retirement. During his career, General Carns served in a variety of operational and management positions and is well versed in the problems facing the defense industry in retaining talented

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Review of the Future of the U.S. Aerospace Infrastructure and Aerospace Engineering Disciplines to Meet the Needs of the Air Force and the Department of Defense design personnel. He is a member of the DSB, which has recently studied similar issues. General Carns is a graduate of the Air Force Academy and received an M.B.A. from Harvard University. Raymond S.Colladay retired as president of Lockheed Martin Astronautics. Earlier positions included director of the Defense Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and associate administrator of NASA. Dr. Colladay has served on the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board of the National Research Council (NRC) and has demonstrated his abilities as chair of the Advanced Space Technology Committee. He has also been a member of the DSB and various other U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) and NASA boards. He is a fellow of AIAA and of the American Astronautical Society. He earned a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from Michigan State University and an M.B.A. from Harvard University. He is especially knowledgeable about how NASA deals with design infrastructure issues. John W.Douglass, Brigadier General, U.S. Air Force (Ret), had a distinguished military career in contracting, engineering, and test and evaluation. He also served as the special assistant to the UnderSecretary of Defense for Acquisition and in the White House as director of National Security Programs. After retiring from the Air Force, Mr. Douglass was appointed Assistant Secretary of the Navy for research, development, and acquisition. He is currently president and CEO of the Aerospace Industries Association (AIA). Mr. Douglass earned M.S. degrees from Fairleigh Dickinson University and Texas Technology University. Robert B.Ormsby, Jr., a member of the NAE, has held many important positions at Lockheed, including group president of Lockheed Aeronautical Systems Group and member of the Lockheed Board of Directors. Mr. Ormsby was chair of the NASA Aeronautics Advisory Committee and is a fellow of AIAA. He graduated from Georgia Institute of Technology with a B.S. in aeronautical engineering and completed the nine-month Sloan Executive Management program at Stanford University. Mr. Ormsby has a strong background in aeronautics and engineering design. George A.Paulikas is retired executive vice president of the Aerospace Corporation, where his chief responsibility was execution of the launch readiness verification process for boosters and spacecraft. Dr. Paulikas participated in more than 150 space launches and spacecraft operations and was intimately involved in the development and flight of a number of advanced space programs critical to national security. Dr. Paulikas has served as consultant to the NASA Office of Space Sciences and the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and the Institute for Defense Analysis. His expertise is in national security space systems. Thomas M.Perdue is currently senior vice president of the Signature Group, a systems integration firm specializing in architectural design and implementation of large-scale local and wide-area networks and the associated communications systems for enterprise-wide application. Prior to his position with the Signature Group, Mr. Perdue was Principal Assistant Deputy UnderSecretary of Defense (Advanced Technology) with responsibility for the development and oversight of advanced concept technology demonstrations (ACTDs), with particular emphasis on the transition of ACTDs into acquisition and operation use. Mr. Perdue’s expertise is in military procurement and contracting. Winfred M.Phillips is currently associate vice president for the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station, College of Engineering, University of Florida. He was previously a professor in the Department of Aerospace Engineering, at Pennsylvania State University. Dr. Phillips’ expertise is in the maintenance of an educated, trained, innovative force of engineering and science professionals who can support the national aerospace infrastructure. Herman M.Reininga has been vice president of operations for Rockwell Collins since 1996. He is responsible for manufacturing, material, quality, and facilities and manufacturing activities throughout Rockwell Collins. Mr. Reininga, a recognized leader in integrating commercial and defense manufacturing technology and manufacturing policies, issues, and processes for government and industry, has testified before the Senate Armed Services Committee on Defense Technology, Acquisition, and Industrial Base. From 1990 to 1992, Mr. Reininga was a member of the DSB. Mr. Reininga has an extensive knowledge in manufacturing and industrial engineering and management. Eli Reshotko, a member of the NAE, is currently Kent H. Smith Professor Emeritus of Engineering at Case Western Reserve University. He is a fellow of the AIAA, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, American Physical Society, and American Academy of Mechanics, of which he is also past president. He is coauthor of more than 100 publications and a member or chair of many task forces, committees, and governing boards. His areas of expertise are viscous effects in external and internal aerodynamics, two-dimensional and three-dimensional compressible boundary layers, heat transfer, stability and transition of viscous flows (both incompressible and compressible), and low-drag technology for aircraft and underwater vehicles. Michael D.Rich held many important positions at RAND, including vice president, National Security Research. Mr. Rich was the corporate officer in charge of the National Defense Research Institute, the Federally Funded Research and

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Review of the Future of the U.S. Aerospace Infrastructure and Aerospace Engineering Disciplines to Meet the Needs of the Air Force and the Department of Defense Development Center that performs research and policy analysis for the Office of the Secretary of Defense and defense agencies, such as the Defense Nuclear Agency and Defense Communications Agency. From 1987 to 1990, he directed two congressionally mandated studies for the undersecretary of defense for acquisition on the B-2 program acquisition strategy. From 1989 to 1992, Mr. Rich served on the Executive Committee of the Army STAR study conducted under the auspices of the NRC. Mr. Rich’s expertise is in the industrial base. Harold W.Sorenson has worked at General Dynamics/Astronautics in San Diego, California, and at AC Electronics Division of General Motors in El Segundo, California. After a year as a guest scientist at the Institute for Guidance and Control in Oberpfaffenhofen, West Germany, he joined the faculty at the University of California, San Diego, as professor of engineering sciences. He remained on the faculty until he became group vice president of the Air Force C3I Group at the Mitre Corporation in Bedford, Massachusetts. He later became corporate director for Air Force Systems and Bedford Operations and senior vice president and general manager for Air Force C3 Systems. He was also a member of the Defense Intelligence Agency Scientific Advisory Board. Mr. Sorenson’s expertise is in control and information systems.