APPENDIX C
Symposium on the Future of Personal Transport Vehicles in China

Friday, January 12, 2001

Speakers List

LIU Zhi, Senior transport economist with the World Bank. He is extensively involved in the Bank’s urban transport operations in China. He co-edited a Bank report on China’s urban transport development strategy. Before joining the Bank, he was a research associate with Harvard Institute for International Development (1993–95), and a faculty member of Nanjing University (1984–87). He received his Ph.D. from Harvard University.

SHAO Min, expert in Environmental Sciences. Professor of Center for Environmental Sciences. He received his Ph.D. from Center of Environmental Sciences, Beijing University. The projects he has completed includes: Studies on modern nuclear sciences and applications to environmental sciences (National natural Sciences Foundation Key Project); Acid deposition Characteristics and control strategies in Qingdao (The Eighth-Five-Years State project); Regional validation of methane emissions (National natural Sciences Foundation Project for Youth); Cost effectiveness analysis of vehicular NOx emission control in Guangzhou (UNDP project). He has published 20 papers in national and international journals.

QIU Yansheng, expert in Petroleum Processing, deputy chief engineer of the Research Institute of Petroleum Processing (RIPP). His academic backgrounds are petroleum products, petroleum additives and tribochemistry. In the past 30 years, he has completed a variety of researches, including metalworking lubricants, gear lubricating oils, rust inhibition oils, rest inhibitors, extreme pressure additives, tribochemistry studies, etc. He has studied tribochemistry as a visiting scholar in Swansea College, Wales University, U.K. from 1985 to 1987. He has published several papers in the domestic and foreign journals, possessed several patents, and got awards from SINOPEC administrations.

LU Ximing, expert in Transportation Planning, director of Shanghai City Comprehensive Transportation Planning Institute. He completed his MA Program in City transportation Planning in Shanghai Tongji University in 1989. He received his MA from Sydney University in Australia, majored in Transportation Planning and Management in 1993. He has presented dozen of papers in International Conferences, more than 300 papers in the various domestic magazines and several special books. The Majors are covered in all fields of transportation system, such as the transportation planning, transportation development policy, city planning, computer mathematics model and transportation economy, etc. He completed dozen of key research and study projects in the past two decades.

Martin Wachs is Director of the Institute of Transportation Studies at the University of California Berkeley, where he is also Professor of City and Regional Planning and Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering. Until 1996 he was Professor of Urban Planning at UCLA for 25 years, where he served three terms as Department Chair. He was the Chairman of the Transportation Research Board during the year 2000,



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 26
The Future of Personal Transport in China: Summary of a Symposium, January 12, 2001 APPENDIX C Symposium on the Future of Personal Transport Vehicles in China Friday, January 12, 2001 Speakers List LIU Zhi, Senior transport economist with the World Bank. He is extensively involved in the Bank’s urban transport operations in China. He co-edited a Bank report on China’s urban transport development strategy. Before joining the Bank, he was a research associate with Harvard Institute for International Development (1993–95), and a faculty member of Nanjing University (1984–87). He received his Ph.D. from Harvard University. SHAO Min, expert in Environmental Sciences. Professor of Center for Environmental Sciences. He received his Ph.D. from Center of Environmental Sciences, Beijing University. The projects he has completed includes: Studies on modern nuclear sciences and applications to environmental sciences (National natural Sciences Foundation Key Project); Acid deposition Characteristics and control strategies in Qingdao (The Eighth-Five-Years State project); Regional validation of methane emissions (National natural Sciences Foundation Project for Youth); Cost effectiveness analysis of vehicular NOx emission control in Guangzhou (UNDP project). He has published 20 papers in national and international journals. QIU Yansheng, expert in Petroleum Processing, deputy chief engineer of the Research Institute of Petroleum Processing (RIPP). His academic backgrounds are petroleum products, petroleum additives and tribochemistry. In the past 30 years, he has completed a variety of researches, including metalworking lubricants, gear lubricating oils, rust inhibition oils, rest inhibitors, extreme pressure additives, tribochemistry studies, etc. He has studied tribochemistry as a visiting scholar in Swansea College, Wales University, U.K. from 1985 to 1987. He has published several papers in the domestic and foreign journals, possessed several patents, and got awards from SINOPEC administrations. LU Ximing, expert in Transportation Planning, director of Shanghai City Comprehensive Transportation Planning Institute. He completed his MA Program in City transportation Planning in Shanghai Tongji University in 1989. He received his MA from Sydney University in Australia, majored in Transportation Planning and Management in 1993. He has presented dozen of papers in International Conferences, more than 300 papers in the various domestic magazines and several special books. The Majors are covered in all fields of transportation system, such as the transportation planning, transportation development policy, city planning, computer mathematics model and transportation economy, etc. He completed dozen of key research and study projects in the past two decades. Martin Wachs is Director of the Institute of Transportation Studies at the University of California Berkeley, where he is also Professor of City and Regional Planning and Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering. Until 1996 he was Professor of Urban Planning at UCLA for 25 years, where he served three terms as Department Chair. He was the Chairman of the Transportation Research Board during the year 2000,

OCR for page 26
The Future of Personal Transport in China: Summary of a Symposium, January 12, 2001 and has written four books and 140 published articles about transportation and land use, the environmental impacts of transportation, and transportation finance. John B.Heywood is director, Sloan Automotive Laboratory and Sun Jae Professor of Mechanical Engineering Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Research Interests Transportation technology, and especially engines, is his primary area of engineering interest. Much of his research, writing and teaching have focused on understanding and explaining the processes which govern the operation and design of internal combustion engines (both spark-ignition and diesel engines), and their fuels requirements. Major research themes include engine combustion, pollutant formation processes and engine and vehicle emissions, factors affecting engine performance and efficiency, engine friction, lubrication and wear. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the NRC Committee to Review the Research Program of the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles. Trevor O.Jones, is chairman and founder of BIOMEC, Incorporated, a biomedical device company. He was formerly chairman of the board of Echlin, Incorporated, a supplier of automotive components primarily to the after-market. Mr. Jones is also chairman and CEO of International Development Corporation, a private management consulting company that advises automotive supplier companies on strategy and technology. He was chairman, president, and CEO (retired) of Libby-Owens-Ford Company, a major manufacturer of glass for automotive and construction applications. Previously, he was an officer of TRW, Incorporated, serving as vice president of engineering in the company’s Automotive Worldwide Sector and group vice president, Transportation Electronics Group. Prior to joining TRW, he was employed by General Motors (GM) in many aerospace and automotive executive positions, including director of GM Proving Grounds and director of GM Advanced Product Engineering Group. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) and a former commissioner of the National Research Council (NRC). Mr. Jones was chairman of the NRC Standing Committee on the Partnership for a New Generation Vehicle (PNGV) from 1993 to 2000. Mr. Jones has served on several other NRC study committees, including the Committee for a Strategic Transportation Research Study on Highway Safety, and chaired the NAE Steering Committee on the Impact of Products Liability Law on Innovation. Ralph Gakenheimer, Department of Urban Studies and Planning, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Ralph Gakenheimer is an urban planner interested in urban infrastructure and transportation in the developing countries and in the United States, with an emphasis on planning process, institutional development, and the relationship between methodologies and decision making. He has lived about seven years abroad, working on problems of urban planning in the developing world for public agencies, universities, foundations, international agencies and consultants. The countries include: Peru, Chile, Egypt, Indonesia, Saudi Arabia, Colombia, Lebanon, Honduras, Costa Rica, Bolivia, Venezuela, Argentina, Thailand, Mexico, Sri Lanka, China and El Salvador. He has headed an MIT faculty team on strategic planning for Bangkok. He is researcher in the MIT-based Cooperative Mobility Program in search of solutions attractive to all mobility stake-holders. He is currently a member of a research group examining alternative policies for the Pearl River

OCR for page 26
The Future of Personal Transport in China: Summary of a Symposium, January 12, 2001 Delta of China, and a research group examining options for future mobility and air quality improvements for the Mexico City Metropolitan Area. Dan Greenbaum joined the Health Effects Institute as its President and Chief Executive Officer on March 1, 1994. In that role, Greenbaum leads HEI’s efforts, supported jointly by US EPA and industry, to provide public and private decision makers with high quality, impartial, relevant and credible science about the health effects of air pollution. Greenbaum recently chaired the EPA Blue Ribbon Panel on Oxygenates in Gasoline which issued its report Achieving Clean Air and Clean Water in July, 1999. Greenbaum also serves on the National Research Council Committee for Research Priorities on Airborne Particulate Matter and the Clean Air Act Advisory Committee. Greenbaum has nearly three decades of governmental and non-governmental experience in environmental health. Just prior to coming to HEI, he served as Commissioner of the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection from 1988 to 1994, where he was responsible for the Commonwealth’s response to the Clean Air Act, as well as its efforts on water pollution and solid and hazardous waste. Greenbaum holds Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees from MIT in City Planning.